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Full text of "9th to 16th Annual Report of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. (1903-1910)"



4 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... .... No. 18. 



NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 



Lyman and Industrial 
Schools 



(Formerly known as Trustees of the State Primary and 
Reform Schools), 



Year ending September 30, 1903. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1904. 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication, 



TUx. 

ftoa -vo 

A 



CONTENTS 



PACK 

Trustees' Report on Lyman School, 5 

Trustees' Report on State Industrial School, . . . . . 18 

Report op Treasurer of Trust Funds, . 24 

Appendix A, Report of Officers of the Lyman School : — 

Report of Superintendent, . 33 

Report of Berlin Farmhouse, 36 

Report of Superintendent of Visitation of Probationers, 39 

Report of Physician, 47 

Statistics concerning Boys, 48 

Financial Statement, 59 

Farm Account, 64 

Valuation of Property, . . . ' 65 

List of Salaried Officers, .67 

Appendix B, Report of Officers of State Industrial School : — 

Report of Superintendent, 71 

Report of Physician, 75 

Statistics concerning Girls, 76 

Financial Statement, 93 

Farm Account, 96 

Valuation of Property, • . . . 97 

List of Salaried Officers, 99 



Commorttotatijj af Utassatjnisttts. 



LYMAN AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS. 



TRUSTEES. 
M. H. WALKER, Westboroug-h, Chairman. 
ELIZABETH G EVANS, Boston, Secretary. 
CHARLES G. WASHBURN, Worcester, Treasurer. 
ELIZABETH C. PUTNAM, Boston. 
EDMUND C. SANFORD, Worcester. 
GEORGE H. CARLETON, Haverhill. 
M. J. SULLIYAN, Chicopee. 

HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS. 
THEODORE F. CHAPIN, Superintendent of Lyman School. 
THOMAS H. AYERS, Visiting Physician of Lyman School. 
WALTER A. WHEELER, Superintendent of Lyman School Probationers. 
FANNIE F. MORSE, Superintendent of State Industrial School. 
CLARA P. FITZGERALD, Visiting Physician of State Industrial School. 
MARY W. DEWSON, Superintendent of Industrial School Probationers. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT 



LYMAN AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools respect- 
fully present the following report for the year ending Sept. 30, 
1903, for the two reform schools under their control. 

LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS AT WESTBOROUG-H. 

The Lyman School is a State institution which attempts the 
education and reformation of boys who are sentenced to its 
care by the courts. Although committed nominally for a 
variety of offences (see table on page 56), a scrutiny of the 
record shows that in over three-quarters of the cases some 
offence against property is alleged, while all the boys, it may 
be said, were running wild and needing some substitute for 
ineffective parental control. This applies equally to those 
committed on the technical offence of ' l stubbornness " — almost 
one-third of the whole number received — and to the half dozen 
or more who come as truants or school offenders, none of whom 
would otherwise be proper subjects for the Lyman School. 
The following are samples of the court records of boys com- 
mitted for stubbornness : — 

Often out late — sometimes all night. Will not work or attend 
school. Roams about with vicious associates, and will not obey his 
mother. She desires his commitment. 

Will not attend school. Stole S3 from a man living in the same 
house ; also a wheel last year, and father paid a fine for him. Step- 
mother cannot control him. 



6 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

For one or two years he has been troublesome and wilful. Will 
not obey and runs away. Has stayed away from home all night. 
Mother says she has exhausted all her powers to govern him and his 
step-father cannot control him at all. Mother thinks it best to place 
him where he will be governed. 

Has been extremely disobedient to his mother for over three years, 
using bad language and threatening to whip her. Stays away from 
home frequently. Was in court Jan. 17, 1903, and placed on proba- 
tion, but did not reform. Father drinks, is vulgar and profane be- 
fore his family. 

While only boys under fifteen are eligible for admission, the 
authority of the school continues during minority, the law 
thus recognizing that these young offenders need not be pun- 
ished, or even be educated for a year or two, but be wisely 
guided and restrained during the critical years preceding man- 
hood. Of the 933 boys who were under the care of the 
school at the close of the year (boys who -are out of the State, 
whereabouts unknown or in prison are not included in this 
figure), only 320 were within the institution, the rest being on 
probation, for the most part, either with their own people or in 
places which the school finds for them. This period of pro- 
bation, extending as it does until a boy reaches majority, is 
believed to be the most valuable feature of the reformatory 
treatment of the Lyman School. 

It is a difficult matter to decide just how long a term of 
detention is of advantage before one or another individual is 
ready for probation. The one clear principle is that im- 
portunity of friends or relatives should not be allowed to be a 
determining factor in the decision. The ideal way, of course, 
would be for some one person of sympathy and judgment to 
have such intimate knowledge of every boy as to deal with 
each case on its merits ; but this is impossible in a school of 
300, broken up into different groups under the government of 
cottage masters and matrons ; and as the best approximation to 
a uniform standard, a marking system has been adopted, which 
regulates the term of a boy's detention by his conduct in the 
school. 

The following statement is sent to the parents of each new- 
comer on his arrival : — 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 7 

Term of Commitment. 
Your son who was committed to the Lyman School for 

Boys at Westborough on the clay of , 190 , in accord- 

ance with the law of the Commonwealth under which all boys are 
committed, will remain in the care and subject to the control of the 
school until he is twenty-one years of age. 

Length of Detention in the School. 
The length of detention in the school depends upon conduct. A 
boy will be obliged to earn five thousand credits before the question 
of his release can be considered. It usually takes about fourteen 
months to earn the required number of credits, but by exceptionally 
good conduct a boy can earn the credits in a year, while by bad con- 
duct the term of his detention will be lengthened. 

Release on Probation. 

When a boy has made up five thousand credits his name will be 
submitted to the trustees for release on probation. If the home is a 
proper one, and it seems probable that his parents can control him, 
he will be released on probation. On the other hand, if on investi- 
gation it is found that his home is not a proper one, he will be placed 
in some other home which the school will select. In either case he will, 
under the law, re'main in the control of the school until he is twenty- 
one years of age, and until then he may at any time be recalled to 
the school. 

Visiting Day. 

Parents may visit their sons on the first Saturday of every month, 
but are requested not to bring presents of money, clothing, fruit or 
eatables of any kind. Books and reading matter approved by the 
superintendent are allowed. Parents wishing to see their sons at 
any other time will need to make previous arrangement by corre- 
spondence with the superintendent. No visits will be permitted on 
Sundays or holidays. 

Co-operation with the School. 
It is hoped that parents in visiting their sons and in their letters 
will encourage them in good conduct, and that in general they will 
work in harmony with the school in its efforts to so train the boys 
that they will grow up honest and self-respecting men. 

T. F. Chapin, Superintendent. 



8 TRUSTEES 5 REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

Under this system the average length of detention at West- 
borouoh is about eighteen months. This means that a lar<re 
number are detained only a year. It is believed that the time 
could not be shorter and allow a boy to benefit at all by the 
training which the school offers. 

The grounds at Westborough comprise some 169 acres of 
land on which are scattered nine family-houses planned for 30 
inmates each, a school-house, a work-shop, barns and various 
other buildings. From the outer aspect, no one would sus- 
pect that the boys who are seen about the open hillside at 
work or play are held under sentence of the law. Single 
boys are trusted about the grounds on errands, and to deliver 
milk in the mornings, long before dawn. On winter evenings 
groups of boys go unattended to and from the schoolhouse. 
As a reward for good conduct, what are called the "honor 
boys" — often 20 or 30 in number — go off on excursions, 
attended only by one master ; and recently when the excursion 
was a picnic at Whitehall Pond, the boys were free to roam 
the woods at will, and to go off fishing on the lake. One boy 
last winter who was allowed as a reward to go home on a visit 
kept faith so far as to present himself again at the school, 
although persuaded by his parents to overstay his leave of 
absence for a day. That freedom will be abused is to be 
expected, and running away from the Lyman School is a not 
infrequent occurrence, especially among the newcomers. When 
this happens no effort is spared to bring the culprit back and 
he is punished for his breach of discipline. In rare cases a 
persistent runaway must be put under forcible restraint ; and 
sometimes, when running away is coupled with other offences, 
a boy may be transferred to the reformatory at Concord, there 
to be held under bolts and bars. But as a rule even the most 
restless settle down after a few breaks ; and taking the school 
as a whole, and in the long run, the policy of freedom is amply 
justified. 

This past year, it must be conceded, has proved something 
of a test of what may be called the open-door policy ; for, 
partly because the school was disorganized for some months 
by a scarlet-fever epidemic, and partly it is hard to know why, 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 9 

the number of runaways has risen beyond all precedent. Out 
of the total of 549 boys on the grounds within the year, no 
less than 84 succeeded in running away, of whom 20 escaped 
twice, or, in some cases, three times, and one got away four 
times. About half of those who effected an escape were so 
promptly returned that they were never recorded as absent 
from the institution, and most of the remaining number were 
brought in after a comparatively short absence. Besides the 
successful escapes there were, of course, numbers of runaways 
planned but intercepted. Probably it would not be an over- 
statement to say that one-fifth of the boys who were on the 
grounds within the }^ear attempted to escape. This sounds 
appalling. But even this extreme figure has elements for en- 
couragement ; for, read the other way, it means that in the 
face of daily opportunity and in the face of a contagious 
example of their fellows, over 400 boys were faithful to their 
trust. 

Of course, in dealing with so large a number of boys of a 
peculiarly unruly age and disposition, much strict discipline 
is necessary, — discipline which is unnecessary in the Berlin 
farmhouse, where the little boys are cared for, and which, 
lacking much in the way of graded classes, music, sloyd and 
drill that Westborough offers, yet lacks also every touch of the 
formality and restraint which is so unescapable in a large institu- 
tion. The Berlin house mother has a wonderful gift with chil- 
dren, and she is ably seconded by her two genial assistants. 
These three together are in such close touch with their charges 
that the individual needs of each is the only accepted order, 
especially in the matter of deciding when the school has done 
its part, and the boy can be reinstated in the community. 
Some half dozen or more little fellows, at board with good 
people in Berlin and its neighborhood, come back to the school 
for occasional holidays and visiting days, and thus a larger 
group of children than the narrow quarters of the farmhouse 
will accommodate remain under its happy influences. 

Other little boys for whom homes cannot be found in the 
neighborhood of the school are boarded out in more distant 
localities, the total number :it board on September 30 being 



10 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

45. Those who prove refractory, whether at Berlin or in 
their places, are sent to Westborough, where they are entered 
for the more s} T stematic training of that branch of the school ; 
but, of the Berlin boys who are now over fourteen years of 
age, about one-half are re-established in their own homes or 
have gone out into the world to earn their way, having escaped 
acquaintance with the tougher element which is a well-recog- 
nized danger in every reform school. For a graphic picture 
of the way of life in this junior branch of the Lyman School 
readers are commended to Mrs. Warner's report, on page 36. 

There is a striking difference between the younger and the 
older boys in the avidity with which the former take to country 
life, while boys over fourteen are often impossible to transplant. 
This fact may be a controlling consideration in deciding whether 
a boy shall go back to his home when he goes out on probation, 
or whether he shall be placed with a farmer. A surprising 
number of the boys belong to people who, while they have 
had no proper control of their children, are yet respectable 
and we]l to do ; but even where this is otherwise, it is some- 
times useless to force a boy's inclination when the ties of blood 
are strong or his aversion to a farm is pronounced. Accord- 
ingly, of the 207 boys who went out on probation during the 
year, 105 went direct to their own homes, 64 were placed with 
farmers to earn their way and 38 of the little boys were boarded. 
Many of these placed and boarded boys are allowed to go home 
before very long, and all who are over eighteen are allowed to 
go home if they so elect. Accordingly, of the probationers 
directly in charge of the visiting department, 381 are with their 
own people, 58 are " for themselves," as the phrase goes, and 
only 174 are with farmers, the boarded children being included 
in this latter figure. A few of the placed-out boys strike root 
into the country community and become respected citizens, 
and quite a number who have chosen to return to the city go 
back to work on farms when city work is slack. Eighty-four 
probationers were returned within the year for a second or a 
third term in the school. Some of these, having satisfied 
themselves and their people that they cannot get on at home, 
will be content to make a fresh start upon a farm. 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 11 

The placing-out system has been so ardently extolled that 
it has sometimes seemed as if it were expected to solve all 
difficulties ; but experience shows that it is less universally 
applicable than was once assumed, and that it is open to dangers 
of its own which can only be averted by careful supervision. 
Both the Westborough and the Berlin boys, when they go out 
on probation, are under the care of the visiting department 
until they attain their majority. That this relation may be a 
pleasant one, and that many bo} r s hold the school in grateful 
recollection, is shown bv the following letters : — 

, Aug. 4, 1903. 

Dear Sir : — I have just received your letter of the 28th, and will 
gladly answer it. I spent the last few months in studying music to 
fit me for the place I am now in. On June 30, '03 I enlisted in the 
Army and like it very well. I cannot say just what I would like to. 
I can't seem to get what I want to say from a pen or pencil. If every 
boy who was at the school got the lesson that I got they are having a 
good time now. 

When I went to the school in 1898 I was put in the band and 
through the instruction of Mr. Wilcox I learned to play a cornet. 
Well, when I went to the school for my second time, I was put in 
the band again. Well, I will tell you Mr. Wheeler I now thank 
God that I was so unfortunate as to be sent to Lyman School. It 
done what I guess no other place could do. 

I used to get some good letters from Mrs. Wheelock when I was 
at home, but I have not got any since I have been out here, I know 
she will write as I think she has just the same kind words for me now 
that she did when I was at the school. The place out here is as good as 
a fellow could want to be in. Up to the day I was sent to Lyman 
School I used tobacco like a child uses candy. The last time 1 u>rd 
tobacco was June 12, 1898, the day before I was sent to Lyman 
School. If you ever want to hear from me, just say so and I will 
gladly answer it. If you see Mr. Wilcox just tell him where his old 
1st cornet player is and tell him that he is the cause of all my good 
luck. I like here and intend to stay and save a little pile and make 
a mark in the world. I am on the road to success and it will take 
more than an ordinary mishap to block my way. I am in the best of 
health and feeling like a king over my success. When I leave the 
baud I will be an all round 1st class musician. This band is con- 



12 TRUSTEES' EEPOKT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

sidered the best band in the Army. As I have nothing more to say 
just now I will have to close hoping it won't be long before I hear 
from you again. 

I remain as ever, 

Sincerely yours, 



-, Feb. 4, 1903. 



Dear Friend : — Your letter received and very glad to hear from 
you. I am very well and havn't had a sick day since I have been up 
in this country. 

I am at work every day and am not afraid of it. I have taken 
another job cutting logs of all kind for over a year and intend to 
make well on it 

I went to Boston last summer and made a little money but it didnt 
go very far, I didnt care much about the city, so came back I really 
enjoy life in the country. I have things very comfortable here I 
have all the good books I want to read besides the papers I get- 
I am now cutting logs and I can tell the difference between every 
native tree. I will mention what kinds of trees there are around here r 
there is, Beach, Birch and Mapple, Bass, Oak, Cherry and Ash, 
Hemlock, Spruce and Poplar and Chestnut. Of course there is two 
different kinds of maples, and cherry, three kinds of Birch and two 
of oak and I can tell the difference between all of them. We have 
a little hog walnut around, most of our axe handles are made of wal- 
nut. I have been choping cord wood a little lately I can average 
two cord a day. I like to chop first rate. Spring seems to be 
near up here, its awful pleasant up in Vermont in the springtime 
everything is green and fresh. I can't think of any more to write at 
present only asking you to excuse my writing sending my best wishes 

to you 

I remain yours sincerely, 



, July 30, 1903. 

Mr. Wheeler. 

Dear Sir : — I received your letter and was glad to hear from you. 
I am getting along fine. I have a good place to work it is for the 
United States Ship Builders Co. and I get 7 dollars a week. But 
just at present I am not working as I have been laid off for two 
weeks. 

Mr. Wheeler will you please see if you can send me the enterprize 
[the School Paper] as I am very interested in the school work.. 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 13 

Mr. Wheeler you don't know how much the school did for me and I 
thank all the teachers and officers that had anything to do with me 
I do not regret a day that I spent in school. 

Remember me to all the teachers and officers and tell the boys I 
am getting along fine. 

I remain yours truly, 



March 12, 1903. 

Dear Sir : — I received your letter a few days ago, and am very 
glad I'm not forgotten. As to my health I was never better, I take 
plenty of exercise to preserve it, my height is 5 ft 8 in and I weigh 
a hundred and thirty-two pounds. Since I left the Lyman School 
and that will be two years the 9th of next September I have been in 

the employ of , here in , a well-to-do manufacturer of 

Goodyear Welting, we make welts for shoes, a welt is that narrow 
strip of leather that goes all around the forward part of the shoe, and 
which is cemented to the upper and the sole. I like my work first 
rate although it is very hard, which of course with plenty of sleep 
and exercise makes a boy strong and keeps him in good health. For 
my work I receive $7 per week I have plenty of time to read in fact 
it is a part of my physical culture. I do not take books from the 
library because all of my friends read the same kind of books as I and 
we trade with each other, as we read them, I read nothing but what 
young people call love-stories, because I believe by so doing, it 
enables a young man to realize what true love is, and also help him 
to make a good choice when he marries. I now must finish trusting 
I have answered all your questions in the proper way, and that you 
will be pleased with them. 

Yours sincerely, 



Mr. Wheeler's report on page 39 gives many interesting par- 
ticulars about the boys on probation. Attention is also called 
to the statistical tables on page 50 which are believed to be 
unique in reformatory institutions. A practical advantage in 
such figures analyzing the careers of graduates during a term 
of years is that they turn attention toward the results of the 
school in fitting its boys for life, and thus neutralize the unreal 
standards which are apt to grow up in an institution. 

The table most eagerly scanned each year is that showing 
the conduct of the group, this year numbering 121, who are 



14 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

passing out of care on the attainment of their majority. Com- 
parative figures reaching back to a time before the present 
visiting system was developed affords- much ground for con- 
gratulation and some for disappointment. 





1893. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


1899. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


190 3. 




Per 

Cent. 


Per 

Cent. 


Per 
Cent. 


Per 

Cent. 


Per 
Cent. 


Per 
Cent. 


Per 
Cent. 


Per 

Cent. 


Per 

Cent. 


Doing well, . . 


.42 


.46 


.53 


.58 


.61 


.69 


.60 


.60 


.58 


Not doing well, 


- 


• 03| 


.02 


.03 


.02 


.02 


.02 


.01 


.02 


Have been in other penal 

institutions. 
Out of the State, 


.35 


.35 

.on 


.30 
.04 


.31 

.02 


.22 
.08 


.22 
.01 


.24 
.07 


.22 
.02 


.29 
.01 


Lost track of , . 


.23 


















Doing well at last ac- 
count. 

Not doing well at last 
account. 




.09) 

.14 
.05) 


.07; 
.04S 


^06 
.03|S 


•04| i 

>.07 
• 02|S 


.06 


- 


- 


.08* 

>.10 
.02S 



> Thirty-four of the 121 boys who came of -age within the 
year had been returned to the school during their probation 
for a second term, or, in a few cases, for transfer to Concord. 
Figures, to be interpreted aright, however, need to be sup- 
plemented by many explanatory statements, and the following 
table shows results which, until interpreted, are quite mis- 
leading : — 



V 


90 

eft 


80 

en 

90 


O 
O 
eft 

eft 

eft 

90 


9 

eft 

O 

O 

eft 


© 
eft 

* 


09 

O 

eft 

• 

e 



Transferred from the Lyman School to the Massachu- 
setts Reformatory at Concord 


11 


9 


7 


3 


2 


15 





These figures do not prove that boys were almost universally 
well behaved in 1901 and 1902 and became unaccountably 
depraved in 1903, but that" the experiment of running a sort 
of a prison at the Lyman School was found in many ways 
to be unsatisfactory, and a crop of bad boys who had been 
accumulating in the school, to its detriment, were finally 
shipped to Concord. 

The most notable occurrence within the year was a scarlet- 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 15 

fever epidemic, which proved the most serious affair of the 
kind in the history of the institution. The disease broke out 
early in January, and quarantine regulations were not sus- 
pended until the middle of May, during which time there had 
been 27 cases of pronounced scarlet-fever and many other 
cases where the disease was suspected. Two inmates and a 
bright little boy of 10, the child of an officer, died. Two other 
children of officers living outside the institution also died, one 
of these, however, having been clearly infected by clothing 
laundered in the town of Westborough, where the earliest 
recognized case of scarlet-fever occurred. While the disease 
prevailed, all classes which brought the boys together from 
different households were suspended, two cottages were vacated, 
one to be used as a hospital and the other for suspected cases, 
visits by parents and friends were forbidden, and no new boys 
were received, nor were inmates allowed to leave the institu- 
tion. During this trying time the officers of the school showed 
a most commendable spirit, and several boys who assisted in 
the hospital during their convalescence deserve great praise 
for their helpfulness. The school, however, has not yet re- 
covered from the demoralization caused by the long interrup- 
tion of its routine and the consequent idleness of its inmates. 
The epidemic cost the State over $2,000 for nurses, supply 
officers and disinfection of the buildings. 

As it is an ill wind that blows good to no one, so on this 
occasion the epidemic called attention to the lack of proper 
hospital accommodations in the school, and an appropriation of 
$10,000 which the Legislature has granted will provide better 
facilities for caring for miscellaneous cases of illness and will 
allow patients whose symptoms are suspicious to be isolated. 
The hospital, which is being built by the boys, is a one-story 
wooden structure, containing a general ward and an isolating 
wing with five private rooms. 

The advisory physicians, Dr. Orville F. Rogers, Dr. Richard 
C. Cabot and Dr. James S. Stone, were invaluable at several 
critical occasions during the epidemic, and were most helpful 
in the preparation of the hospital plans. Indeed, it was due 
to their urgent advice that the trustees made bold to ask for the 
hospital. The thanks of the trustees are here tendered to these 
gentlemen for their gratuitous service-. 



16 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

Besides the money for the hospital, $700 was appropriated 
for an addition to the office and $700 to provide porches for 
the school-house. The former of these is nearly completed 
and the latter will be done before winter. 

The new' sewer system connecting the school with the town 
sewage is working satisfactorily. The initial cost was $10,500, 
and an annual rental is paid to the town for the use of the 
beds. A surplus of $3,500 from the sewage appropriation was 
spent to renovate the plumbing of the institution, which is now 
in a very satisfactory condition. 

The overcrowding of the institution mentioned in last year's 
report is less serious than would have ensued had not the 
number of newcomers been reduced by the long quarantine ; 
but commitments, nevertheless, have run as high as 174, which 
figure has been only three times exceeded, and the number in 
the school has stood as high as 342. The need of a new cot- 
tage is thus very urgent, and it is hoped that it will not be 
denied. A small appropriation is also needed to replace the 
worn-out oven in the bakery. 

For some years it has been customary to hire an adjoining 
farm for $300, as otherwise there is not land enough to utilize 
the boys' labor in raising produce for the school consumption. 
It would certainly be good economy for the State to buy 
instead of hiring, and an appropriation will be asked for this 
purpose. 

The Lyman School opened the year with 317 inmates and 
closed with 320. The whole number in the school during the 
year was 549, while the average number was 327.37. The 
total number of boys whose names were upon the books on 
September 30 as under twenty-one years of age was 1,281 ; of 
these, 320 were in the school, 836 were in the care of the 
visiting department, 43* were runaways from the school, and 
81 others were discharged, returned to court, transferred to 
other institutions or dead. 

The appropriations for running the school the past year were : 
for salaries, $29,600 ; for current expenses, $47,601, — a total 
of $77,200 for running the institution. To be expended on 

* Eight of these are known to be in other institutions, and one to have enlisted in the 
navy. 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 17 

• behalf of probationers : for visitation, $8,000 ; for boarding, 
$5,000; for tuition fees to towns, $500. The expenditure in 
behalf of the institution from Oct. 1, 1900, to Sept. 30, 1901, 
was $79,876.50. The expenditures in behalf of probationers 
was $12,868.46. The per capita cost of the institution was 
|4.74, and $408.90 was turned into the State treasury, making 
a net per capita cost of $4. 7 2 . The per capita cost for the family 
at Berlin was $2.90, 1 the per capita cost of visitation was 17 
cents per week, and the per capita for the whole body of boys 
in the care of the school, whether as inmates or probationers, 
was approximately $1.39 per week. 

1 This figure takes account only of the outlay for the Berlin family, and does not 
charge to it any share of the central administration. 



18 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 



STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS AT LAN- 
CASTER. 

The two-fold question — whether there is a demand for such 
an institution as the State Industrial School ; whether, there 
being a demand, the results justify its cost to the State — will 
be here answered as honestly as facts and figures ^can be made 
to answer. 

As to the demand, the fact that 63 per cent., or more than 
half the commitments to this school, were this year made upon 
complaint of parent or guardian, shows that there was at least 
an honest desire on their part to secure for these young girls 
opportunity to recover from their folly and to make a fresh 
start. Threats, punishment, perhaps probation from the courts, 
having proved unavailing, this one more attempt is to be made 
in their behalf, rather than let them drift into that life of 
degradation from which the community will do well to rescue 
all young persons who are capable of some better career. 

But the girl who has been arrested and ' « sent away " against 
her will is not to be forced into humility and repentance. She 
knows full well that her companions in lawlessness go at large, 
unpunished ; that laws are enforced and penalties bear more 
heavily upon women than upon men ; and she comes to the 
school in no gentle mood. She must, therefore, be won, little 
by little, by busy work and by interesting occupations, to dis- 
cover that happiness can be found in innocent ways. 

The classification, so important where all have been in some 
degree offenders or in danger of becoming offenders against 
law and order, has been greatly helped by the Bolton branch of 
the school, which was opened last July, the family there being 
housed exactly as are those on the grounds at Lancaster, with 
the same simple, homely methods of heating, lighting, cooking 
and washing. On the other hand, the cottages where those 
who have had least experience of evil are placed are recognized 
by experts in public schools as hardly distinguishable from 
groups of average public school girls. Another step in classi- 
fication has been taken by placing in one house those who in a 
marked degree are below the average in intelligence. Eour 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 19 

of these girls had already been committed by court to the 
Massachusetts School for the Feeble-minded, but that institution 
has for months been too much overcrowded to receive them. 
There are others whom the physicians find to be suitable sub- 
jects for that school . When these are removed the girls who 
are simply backward can be suitably grouped together under a 
teacher who is zealous in adapting her training to such pupils. 

During the past year the school has received by commitment 
from the courts and by transfer by the State Board 89 girls, — 
some of them unusually unpromising; others somewhat more 
intelligent and capable than the average. 

A study of the domestic conditions of the girls (see Table 
XVIII. on page 86 of this report) all under seventeen years of 
age, this year committed, serves to explain in part their mis- 
conduct, only one-third having had homes where both parents 
were living, many coming from homes where intemperance or 
gross immorality was practised. Less than one-quarter had 
reached the seventh grade of the grammar school, while 10 had 
never known or had forgotten how to read or write. About 
one-third had worked in factories, half that number at house- 
work or in hotels, boarding-houses or restaurants. 

The main object of the school is to discover and develop in 
each girl the capacity for a better kind of home life than she 
has ever yet known, at the same time rousing her interest in 
study, music, out-of-door work and play. The course is so 
planned as in one year to fit a capable, docile girl for taking a 
place in a family where she can assist in housework, cooking, 
washing and ironing, the six months spent in the kitchen, 
laundry and dining-room work having tested her fidelity and 
power of self-control. In addition to these household arts, 
sewing and cutting are taught : also daily lessons, with music- 
reading by note and the Swedish system of manual training. 
" What a heavy bag ! " " Yes, but it has my Sloyd work in 
it, and father has tools and I'm going to keep on with it at 
home." This was the reply of an ambitious girl, whom her 
mother had been unable to control, but who had in twenty-one 
month- earned herrighl to go back to her good home on proba- 
tion, to re-enter the public school there. The gymnastics are 
very valuable, and doubtless as a result of gymnastic (raining 



20 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct, 

base ball is plaj^ed in matched games between the several fam- 
ily-houses with sustained interest. 

It is a great help to a girl going out from the school to have 
felt grateful appreciation of all the school has done for her ; it 
is a still more lasting benefit when, during the trying season 
of probation outside the school, her confidence can be secured 
and her very own will enlisted in loyalty to principles of rec- 
titude. One such voluntary act is worth more than many of 
enforced submission to rules under which she bitterly chafes. 
A girl who through her irascible temper had lost eight places, 
at last earned a recommendation from her employer for thor- 
oughly faithful care of the baby, and then, at some risk, was 
allowed to try the much coveted work by the day. When such 
a girl brings her friends to be presented to her visitor, talking 
freely of her own affairs and of matters of general interest, it 
is worth while to take some risk ; to relax the restraints which 
are absolutely necessary in case of a girl who is believed to be 
planning mischief or with brutish instincts and little else. 
The general characteristics of the Industrial School girls are 
willfulness, waywardness and excitability, and yet there are 
among them those who had long been oppressed by their sur- 
roundings, and under happier auspices prove to be steady and 
in no wise abnormal. Z, proud and independent, yet with a 
sturdy kind of conscientiousness, would find places without 
reporting, costing her visitor m&ny tramps. At last the girl 
discovered that the visitor really had confidence in her, and her 
reserve gave way so that at twenty-one these friendly relations 
will not be broken, while her own relatives have at last come 
to believe in her. 

The decision in each case, whether or how soon a girl may 
safely return to her home and to work by the day (for a meagre 
tenement is not likely to keep her busy ) , requires much care- 
ful study. As a general rule, a place among strangers gives a 
better starting point until habits of obedience acquired in the 
school can be confirmed and earnings put by on deposit. One 
girl, whose home had been miserable, has on deposit $120, and 
is now earning $5 per week, from which she pays her board. 
Now, over twenty years of age, she will be allowed to go 
home to look after her younger sister who is getting wild, 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 21 

"For you know I have had experience and I think I could 
help her." 

The most perplexing cases are of those who have not a 
decent home to return to, yet feel themselves capable of some 
of the various kinds of work which they believe essential to 
secure a better social position. For those who can earn only 
$3 and must pay at least $2.50 for board, the difficulties are 
great and their need of wise and sympathetic help imperative. 
The more capable, after learning how to stand firmly and to 
get along with others, become able to fill what are known as 
" positions." The Fay prizes, from a fund bequeathed by the 
father of Hon. Frank B. Fay, are, however, reserved for girls 
who have long and faithfully filled their places in families. 

J. K. had behaved well in the school and in her place until 
a visit of a week or two in her own home broke up her habits 
of obedience, and she became so troublesome that her employer 
was on the point of asking to have her returned to the school. 
The girl begged for another trial in her place, and when, in 
the summer, she went at her own request to the school on a 
visit, she told her school-mates that she had been out a whole 
year and advised them to do likewise. She then returned to 
her place full of gratitude to the superintendent and the rest 
who had been so kind to her, and has continued to express her 
gratitude by her good conduct. 

Among those who have cost much care is a young mother, 
who, had she not been encouraged to forget her disgrace in her 
mother love for her child, illegitimate, but so much the more 
dependent upon her, would have dropped her responsibilities, 
which, not being dropped, have proved to be her redemption 
from a life of selfish, reckless indulgence. This girl, bright 
and attractive, with almost uncontrollable animal instincts, 
mismanaged by her own people, stubborn and reckless, came 
out from the State hospital with her infant boy. In her first 
place she resented the impertinent addresses of a neighbor; in 
her second, all went well, but the family moved away ; in her 
third, the other hired helpers made trouble 'for her ; in the 
fourth she proved unsatisfactory ; in the fifth her boy safely 
came through whooping cough on the fine hill farm, but her 
hot temper lost her the place ; in the sixth all went well, but 



22 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

the family could not afford to keep her ; in the seventh her 
boy is in clover, and his mother is well liked. Some of the 
girls long past twenty-one come to revisit the school or those 
connected with it, or to ask of Mrs. Morse, Miss Beale or 
Miss Jacobs advice as to the bringing up of their own children. 

In the conduct table, page 82, will be found the final rec- 
ord of girls attaining majority (twenty-one years of age), or 
discharged sooner by vote of the trustees, as well as that of all 
still under age and in the school's care. It will be seen that 
while 15 per cent., an unusually large number, are known to 
have become backsliders, 74 per cent., a larger proportion than 
usual, by recent conscientious investigation are known to have 
become honestly self-supporting, or married and living respect- 
ably. The number not known about, 11 per cent., is smaller 
than ever before. 

The histories given above tend to show that beyond question 
there is a demand for the State Industrial School ; that girls 
who could not at the outset be placed directly from the courts 
can be prepared for family life after a year or two in the 
school ; but that to render the school work effective, the sub- 
sequent care and guidance must be carefully adapted to the 
needs of each individual, for it is individual work that counts 
most in the end. 

The hospital, for which $9,000 was last year appropriated, is 
well advanced, and will provide offices for the physician and 
dentist ; a receiving room and bathing room for all newcomers 
at the school and opportunity for any who are ailing to be 
visited by the physician before being placed with the rest. 
The large, sunny ward will receive ordinary cases, greatly 
relieving the family-houses and providing better ventilation 
than can be secured for an invalid in the very small separate 
rooms in the family-houses. 

Appropriations were also granted for a cattle barn, $5,400; 
for alterations and repairs in the superintendent's house and in 
the family houses, and additional water supply, $3,900 ; for 
sewage at Bolton, $3,000 ; and $503 for fees to engineer and 
lawyer. 

The Bolton establishment, which was occupied last July, 
cost $27,403, of which $2,900 was spent for the land, $18,500 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 23 

for building, $2,000 for furnishings, $500 for water supply, 
and $3,503, as stated above, for sewage and engineer and 
legal fees. The house affords accommodations for 30 girls, and 
there is room upon the grounds for other houses, to be added 
as occasion requires. 

Special appropriations will be asked this year to remedy the 
faulty sewage of the school at Lancaster, and to allow further 
repairs in the older family houses, in the farmhouse and the 
chapel, and to reclaim a piece of meadow land which will be 
valuable if brought under cultivation. 

The appropriation for carrying on the school was $43,647, 
of which $18,162 was for salaries and $25,485 for current ex- 
penses, and the appropriation for boarding out younger girls 
and for other expenses in behalf of probationers was $5,370, 
with $125 for tuition paid to towns. 

The expenditure for carrying on the school, exclusive of 
money spent on probationers, from Sept. 30, 1903, was 
$44,462.40, which makes a per capita cost of $4.21 gross, and 
$4.13 net. 

The school opened the year with 189 inmates, and closed 
with 207 ; average number, 203. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. H. WALKER. 
EDMUND C. SANFORD. 
ELIZABETH C. PUTNAM. 
GEORGE H. CARLETON. 
CHARLES G. WASHBURN. 
M. J. SULLIVAN. 
ELIZABETH G. EVANS. 



24 TREASURER'S REPORT TRUST FUNDS. [Oct. 



TEUST FUND OF LYMAN AND INDUS- 
TKIAL SCHOOLS. 



TREASURER'S REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPT. 30, 1903. 

Worcester, Mass., Oct. 14, 1903. 
To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

I herewith submit my annual report for the financial year 
ending Sept. 30, 1903. 

Lyman School, Lyman Fund. 

1902. Dr. 

Oct. 1. Balance brought forward, $1,575 46 

Nov. 4. First National Bank, dividend, . . . . >- 50 00 

20. Interest on deposit, 3 29 

26. Interest on deposit, 3 36 

26. National bank tax rebate, 150 00 

1903. 

Jan. 1. Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, . . . 321 75 

1. Interest Chicago, Burlington & Quincy joint 4's, . 40 00 

1. Dividend Fitchburg Railroad, . . . . 115 00 

20. Interest on deposit, . . . ,,. . . 2 12 

24. Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank, closing 3£ per 

cent, account, 1,616 43 

29. Springfield Institution for Savings, closing 3£ per 

cent, account, 410 64 

Feb. 3. Amherst Savings Bank, over deposit, ... 50 00 

18. Hampden Savings Bank, 1,616 41 

20. Interest on deposit, 2 05 

Mar. 17. Interest on deposit, 3 42 

April 1. Chicago Junction and Union Stock Yards, interest, 80 00 

1. Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, . . . 286 00 

1. Fitchburg Railroad, dividend, . . . . 115 00 

1. Citizens National Bank, dividend, .... 120 00 

1. Quinsigamond National Bank, dividend, . . 15 00 
6. Central National Bank, in liquidation, dividend 

No. 1, ... 1,000 00 

Amount carried forward, f 7,575 93 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



25 



Amount brought forward, $7,575 93 

May 1. Dividend First National Bank, .... 

25. Interest on deposit, 

July 1. Dividend Boston & Albany Railroad, 

1. Dividend Fitchburg Railroad, 

1. Interest Chicago, Burlington & Quincy joint 4's, . 

16. Interest on deposit, 

Aug. 21. Interest on deposit, 

Sept. 10. Central National Bank, in liquidation, dividend 

No. 2 

29. Interest on deposit, 

30. Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, 
30. Fitchburg Railroad, dividend, .... 
30. Citizens National Bank, dividend, .... 
30. Quinsigamond National Bank, dividend, 
30. Interest Chicago Junction Railways and Union 

Stock Yards, 

30. Interest on deposit, 

Total to balance, f 9,057 3a 



30 00 


3 64 


357 50 


115 00 


100 00 


3 22 


2 40 


250 00 


1 86 


286 00 


115 00 


120 00 


15 00 


80 00 


1 78 



1902. OR. 

Oct. 17. Gospel services, 

17. Redemption of token money, . 

17. Loan on greenhouse account, . 

17. Ethel Edgecomb, entertainment, 

25. Trombone, .... 

Nov. 13. C. L. Judkin, lecture, 

13. Banner, 

13. Alliston Green, extra salary, . 

13. A. S. Roe, lecture, . 

22. D. F. Lincoln, lecture, . 

Dec. 5. Redemption of token money, . 

8. $1,000 Chicago, Burlington & Quincy joint 
95-f and commission, . 

11. Alliston Green, extra salary, . 

11. Repairing music holders, 

15. Band book, .... 

27. Christmas fruit, 

27. Christmas boxes, 

27. Christmas confectionery, 

1903. 

Jan. 2. Christmas celebration, 

7. A. S. Roe, lectures, . 

7. Gospel services, 

7. Redemption of token money, . 

Amount carried forward, . 



4's, at 



$26 00 


100 00 


70 00 


10 14 


20 00 


10 00 


10 00 


16 67 


10 00 


10 00 


100 00 


958 75 


16 66 


75 


2 07 


13 00 


5 25 


33 50 


10 00 


30 00 


26 00 


100 00 



£1,578 79 



2Q TREASURER'S REPORT TRUST FUNDS. [Oct, 



Amount brought forward, 



Jan. 


7. 




26. 




29. 


Feb. 


3. 




13. 




19. 


Mar. 


4. 




11. 




30. 


Aprl 


7. 



9. 

16. 

24. 
May 11. 

26. 

26. 

26. 

26. 
July 10. 

13. 

13. 

13. 

13. 

13. 
Au2. 6. 



27. 
27. 
29. 



Sept. 



9. 
9. 
9. 
9. 
9. 
9. 
9. 
9. 
9. 
17. 



Lessons in basketry, 

$1,000 Chicago, Burlington & Quincy joint 4's, at 

94| and commission, . 
People's Savings Bank for deposit 

Books, 

Lessons in basketry, 

$2,000 Chicago, Burlington & Quincy joint 4's, at 

93| and interest, 

Lessons in basketry, 

Redemption of token money, .... 
Worcester Five Cents Savings Bank for deposit, 
Worcester Mechanics Savings Bank for deposit, 
Lessons in basketry, 
Books 



Gospel services, 

Books, 

State Safe Deposit Company, box rent, 
Redemption of token money, . 
Social Service Troop, entertainment,' 
Redemption of token money, . 

Books, 

Expenses, honor boys to Concord, 

Books, 

Books, 

Gospel services, 
Redemption of token money, . 
Fireworks, .... 
Music paper, .... 
Confectionery for July 4, 
A. S. Roe, lecture, . 
Musical instruments, 

Books, 

Redemption of token money, . 

Band instruction, 

Band instruments, . 

IVlr. & Mrs. C. A. Merrill, lost time. 

Mary F. Wilcox, lost time, 

Alliston Green, lost time, 

J. W. Mason, lost time, . 

Mrs. J. W. Mason, lost time, . 

Music books, .... 

Books, 

Educational Publishing Company. 

Musical instruments, 

Music, . . . . 



Amount carried forward, 



$1,578 79 


26 50 


943 75 


410 64 


8 00 


65 50 


1,893 38 


67 50 


100 00 


400 00 


1,000 00 


60 00 


1 45 


6 00 


76 44 


5 00 


100 00 


12 32 


100 00 


2 00 


10 00 


33 66 


3 43 


26 00 


100 00 


75 00 


1 20 


24 25 


10 00 


7 00 


v 4 47 


100 00 


50 00 


691 86 


89 91 


158 93 


111 11 


51 76 


12 50 


4 86 


14 64 


46 


3 15 


88 



$8,442 34 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 27 

Amount brought forward, $8,442 34 

Sept. 17. Musical instrument straps, 75 

17. Musical instruments, 1 90 

17. Band instruction, William J. Wilcox, ... 25 00 

17. Subscription to " International Studio," ... 3 25 

17. Books, 23 20 

23. Two rights First National Bank stock, ... 3 00 

30. Balance forward, 557 89 

Grand total, $9,057 33 

Lyman School, Mart Lamb Fund. 

1902. Dr. 

Oct 1. Balance forward $196 93 

1903. 

Jan. 1, Dividend Boston & Albany Railroad, ... 13 50 

April 1. Dividend Boston & Albany Railroad, ... 12 00 

July 1. Dividend Boston & Albany Railroad, ... 15 00 

Oct. 1. Dividend Boston & Albany Railroad, ... 12 00 



1903. CR. 

Jan. 29. Deposit People's Savings Bank, . 

Sept. 30. Balance forward, 

Industrial School, Mary Lamb Fund. 

1902. Dr. 

Oct. 1. Balance forward, 

Dec. 11. People's Savings Bank, deposit, . 

1903. 

Jan. 1. Interest American Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany 

2. Interest American Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany 

1902. CR. 

Nov. 26. Expenses Helen Stockman, 

Dec. 5. Sloyd apparatus, 

1903. 

Jan. 14. Christmas celebration, 

Sept. 30. Balance forward, 



$249 43 

$150 00 
99 43 

$249 43 



$77 93 


275 00 


20 00 


20 00 


$392 93 


$12 00 


310 00 


50 00 


30 93 



$392 93 



28 TREASURER'S REPORT TRUST FUNDS. [Oct. 



Industrial School, Fay Fund. 

1903. Dr. 

Feb. 9. Deposit Chelsea Savings Bank, 



$35 00 



1903. CR. 

Feb. 9. F. F. Morse, superintendent, . 



$35 00 



Inventory of Lyman School Investments, Sept. 30, 1903. 



Lyman Fund. 

Real estate in West borough, . 
143 shares Boston & Albany Railroad stock, . 
92 shares Fitchburg Railroad stock, 
10 shares Central National Bank stock (in 
liquidation, estimated dividend due 8 per 

cent), 

40 shares Citizens National Bank stock, 
10 shares First National Bank stock (in liqui- 
dation), 

5 shares Quinsigamond National Bank stock, 
$5,000 Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 

joint 4's, bonds, 

$4,000 Chicago Junction Railways and Union 

Stock Yards Company, bonds, . 
Amherst Savings Bank, .... 
Fall River Five Cent Savings Bank, 
Franklin Savings Institution, . 
Palmer Savings Bank, .... 
People's Savings Bank, .... 

Ware Savings Bank, 

Westborough Savings Bank, . 
Worcester County Institution for Savings, 
Worcester Five Cent Savings Bank, 
Worcester Mechanics Savings Bank, 
Worcester North Savings Institution, 
Mechanics National Bank, balance, . 



Par Value. 

$22,000 00 

14,300 00 

9,200 00 



80 00 
4,000 00 

1,000 00 
500 00 

5,000 00 

4,000 00 

1,603 32 

1,090 41 

1,360 78 

1,477 71 

1,472 94 

1,510 66 

1,318 40 

1,640 56 

947 20 

1,010 00 

1,360 78 

557 89 



Market Value. 

$22,000 00 
35,178 00 
12,374 00 



80 00 
5,600 00 

1,000 00 
700 00 

4,481 00 

4,170 00 
1,603 32 
1,090 41 
1,360 78 
1,477 71 
1,472 94 
1,510 66 
1,318 40 
1,640 56 

947 20 
1,010 00 
1,360 78 

557 89 



Totals, 



$75,430 65 $100,933 65 



Mary Lamb Fund. 

6 shares Boston & Albany Railroad, . . $600 00 $1,476 00 

People's Savings Bank, Worcester, . . . 1,464 49 1,464 49 

Mechanics National Bank, balance, ... 99 43 99 43 



Totals, 



$2,163 92 $3,039 92 






PUBLIC DOCOIEVT — >";. 1* 



I 



Inventory of Istjustriax School Imvkst* 

Mary Lamb Fund. 

f 1,000 American Telephone and Telegraph 

Companr ±' a : L :-9) S 

People's Savings Bank, 

Mechanics National Bank, balance, . 






:'. ri 



161 ; 



11,192 95 f 1,130 45 



Town of Reading note (custody of S:^:e Treas- 
urer), dated Nov. 27, 1899, due Nov. 27, IS _ : . 
3f per cent., 

Accumulated income, Sept. 30, 1903, 



118 29 118 29 



Totals $:.::s :> 



$:.::- ::- 



Fund. 
Worcester Mechanics Savings Bank, 



$:.::•: . : s p :;- m 



Examined and approved : Geo. H. Cabxiitox. 
E. C. Savtizz. 



> Auditing 



C. Ct. WASHBURN, 



Appendix A. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS 



WESTBOROUGH. 



1902-1903. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

The event of the year was the scarlet- fever epidemic. It broke out 
virulently near the beginning of January, and Dr. Ayer did not give 
a clean bill of health until the middle of the following May. While 
the cases were very numerous, the majority were mild, although a few 
were very severe and three fatal. Officers were not exempt, and of 
children of officers three died. 1 To separate the actual and suspected 
cases, as well as convalescents, required that two cottages be given 
up to that purpose. The crowding of ten family groups into eight 
houses, the suspension of school and lack of regular employment 
were very detrimental to the morale of the institution. The officers 
all stood bravely to their guns and were faithful and loyal, although 
it was a dreadful experience. But despite the interruption referred 
to, the work of the past year is something of which one need not be 
ashamed. 

The school is now organized so that the teachers can do much 
individual instruction, the number present with one teacher varying 
from 10 to 25. It is the aim to make the low-grade classes very 
small. There are nine grades and a high-school grade. Mr. Puffer 
has done efficient work in organization of the grades, and, assisted by 
a loyal and enthusiastic corps of teachers, the progress of pupils has 
been commendable. The number of boys advanced one grade during 
the year was 239, the number advanced two grades was 45, while 19 
failed to advance a grade. The school hours are from 9 a.m. to 12 m. 
and from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., most of the boys attending only one session. 
The manual training classes are also held during these hours. A boy 
receives three hours' instruction in the school of letters besides his 
manual training. Music is taught by a special teacher, with whom 
the grade teacher co-operates. Music is made much more than a 
pastime. As most of the pupils are at the adolescent period of life, 
little can be done in voice culture ; but they learn note reading, and 
there is excellent training in the mathematics of music, and they learn 
to sing and enjoy first-class music. 

1 Two of these lived outside the institution. 



34 SUPT.'S REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

Instruction in drawing, designing and color work, while occupying 
but an hour out of the weekly eighteen, is fruitful in imparting the 
principles which underlie all good art. To give the inspiration of 
good work from a master hand, fifty-three pictures, reproductions of 
some of the best art of the world, were framed under the direction 
of the art teacher and hung where they are accessible to the boys and 
teachers. A deep interest has been manifested in them. 

Physical culture is carried forward under the same efficient teacher 
as heretofore, and is a combination of the setting-up exercises of the 
United States army and the Swedish educational gymnastics. The 
aim is harmonious development of the whole body and a ready com- 
mand of it. Incidental to these it is a valuable training in precision, 
accuracy, prompt obedience and o'ther valuable moral attainments. 

Under the able teachers of manual training, that department, both 
the Sloyd and the advanced work, has gone forward, accomplishing 
most praiseworthy results. It is the aim to give the elementary or 
Sloyd to every boy, and approximately this is accomplished. About 
one-third get the benefit of the advanced manual training. 

Supplementary to this graded instruction in the use of tools is the 
class in carpentry, in which from 8 to 12 boys do practical work in 
cabinet making or house building throughout the year. In addition 
to his efficient teaching in this department, Mr. Wilcox instructs a 
band of 32 members, who with their fine new instruments are making 
excellent progress. 

The printing class, with its 16 members, is a helpful adjunct to the 
school work besides affording an excellent training. Several boys 
have been put by it in the way of earning their livelihood. 

A feature of the school work which deserves recognition rather from 
its promising beginning than its -results is the course in agriculture. 
Mr. Cockburn, our agriculturist, gave a course of simple practical 
talks last February followed as soon as the spring opened by work in 
a practice garden, wherein each boy had a plat and learned something 
about growing vegetables under instruction. The plats were rented 
to them, and each boy had the returns, and in each case there was a 
small return over the amount paid for rent, which profit the boy 
received. 

The farm has "done as well as the season would permit. Anew 
farm supervisor each year for three years has not been conducive to a 
systematic treatment of the land, but all things considered the returns 
have been good. 

The herd of cows has been depleted by removal of all diseased 
animals and unprofitable ones and the vacant stalls partly filled with 
new cows. , 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 35 

The beautifying of the ground has made considerable progress and 
in this work Mr. Hallier and his boys have been a potent factor. 
The greenhouse has been a source of pleasure and some profit. It is 
a valuable school adjunct. 

Mr. Wilcox and his class of 10 boys are building the new hospital, 
and making satisfactory progress in its erection. Everything is being 
done in a first-class manner and would be creditable to more experi- 
enced workmen. The well-laid cobble stone basement, granolithic 
steps, walks and a strip three feet wide next the underpinning around 
the entire building attest Mr. Mason's energy and skill with hoy labor. 
It is hoped to have the building enclosed before very cold weather. 

The addition to the superintendent's office room and the school 
porches is progressing satisfactorily. The completed sewer is a 
source of comfort, and relieves much anxiety about unhealthy con- 
ditions. 

The need of another cottage grows each year more urgent, as refer- 
ence to tables of population will show. The brick oven at the bakery 
should be rebuilt the coming year and ought to be enlarged to meet 
the increasing demands upon it. I therefore renew the recommenda- 
tion of last year for a pair of ovens, in which continuous heat can be 
maintained. It would be good economy to buy additional land. For 
five years we have been improving a hired farm, and the rent thus paid 
would cover the interest on the purchase price and in time the principal. 
It also seems desirable, for the health of cows, that there be pasture in 
which they may roam during the open season. 

Although the average school population has been greater the past 
year than heretofore, the weekly per capita cost is considerably higher 
than last year and a little higher than in any one of the nine years 
previous. One-half of this increase is accounted for by the extra 
expense of last winter for physicians, nurses, etc., in the epidemic, 
the remainder by high cost of fuel and the destruction of the herd of 
cows. 

My corps of helpers was never better as a whole. There is a good 
spirit throughout the school and earnest, sincere work is being done. 
The report of Mrs. Warner, the manager of the Berlin department, is 
appended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. F. CHAPIN, 

Sujjeri/dendent. 



36 FABMHOUSE EEPOET LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 



KBPORT OF THE BERLIN FARMHOUSE. 



To the Superintendent of the Lyman School for Boys. 

The management of the Berlin farm school has at times been criti- 
cised because the punishments were so light and life made so attrac- 
tive to the boys placed here. It was suggested that parents might be 
tempted to commit their children to the Lyman School in order that 
they might be cared for at the expense of the State. 

This criticism was brought to mind when, five months ago, a boy 
was sent here from a city to which two young brothers had been re- 
turned after a year's absence, a part of this time having been spent 
in a farmer's family. The newcomer glibly announced that he knew 

the boys. u Oh, yes," said he, "1 got in trouble with them 

when they was sent away, and my mother had to pay five dollars to 
get me off ; but this time she said I might go and see if it would do 
me as much good as it did them. Why, they don't run with the gang 
at all. After six o'clock they stay in the house and read books. In 
school they can do fractions better'n any one." 

Now Johnnie is following in the footsteps of his former companions, 
Joseph and Thomas, — making a reputation for good or evil in a 
farmer's family. Let us hope for good ; yet such bitter disappointments 
have been experienced of late that it is difficult at times to be as opti- 
mistic as one should be to be truly successful in this work. 

At the risk of provoking more criticism of the same kind I venture 
on a description of a summer or autumn visiting day at the farm. 
Bright and early in the morning every boy having regular work to do 
is alert and active. All Saturday work that could as well be done on 
Friday has been done, even at the sacrifice of play time. Tasks that 
generally seem irksome are completed with dispatch. Nothing, how- 
ever, is slighted to-day for there is a chance that mother or sister will 
inspect the work. By nine o'clock visitors begin to arrive. If it is 
known that a mother is coming with a little child to carry her boy is 
allowed to meet her at the train and help her with her bundles, for 
you must know that every one brings a lunch to be eaten, picnic 
style, on the lawn, in the orchard, near the pond, or, if so inclined, 
in the large hay barn. Here the wide doors at either end are thrown 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 37 

open, and the breeze that passes through is fragrant with the fresh 
hay, and the song of birds in the orchard mingles harmoniously with 
the merry chatter of old and young. 

On one side of the barn several trapeze swings are arranged over 
a ton or two of clean sweet hay, which makes a tumble now and then 
of no consequence. These swings are in constant use by the boys 
during the day, either to exhibit their skill as gymnasts, or to allow 
the visiting brothers and sisters to share in their fun. The number 
of visitors here is larger than might be expected, owing to the fact 
that the boys boarded in families in different parts of the town come 
here to meet their parents as though they were still members of the 
school. After dinner a tour of the boy's own little garden is made, 
and if any lunch box is taken home empty it is from choice, for the 
results of their labor are freely offered, and it is a proud boy that can 
contribute a pint of beans, a few ears of corn or a fine squash toward 
the Sunday dinner at home. 1 Not often will a mother admit that her 
boy was a bad boy ; but very often, after witnessing his cheerful obe- 
dience here, she will wonderingly inquire, " How do you get him to 
mind? I couldn't do it." Now, if not allowed to talk freely with 
her son alone she would doubtless go home confident that he was the 
victim of some severe punishment. Perhaps she would not believe 
that the boy who took raisins from an unlocked closet without per- 
mission was more severely punished by having his birthday cake set 
before him, minus the usual amount of raisins, than he would have 
been by a whipping ; but such was the fact. 

No apparent harm has ever resulted from unrestricted intercourse 
between parent and child, so they roam at will over the grounds, and 
the parent goes home content and satisfied with the situation. 

Our mail is carried to and from the post-office, a mile distant, by 
trusted boys, and never has our trust been seriously abused. In a 
few instances the messenger has stopped by the way to converse with 
other boys, but a withdrawal of confidence was his surest punishment. 

During the year, 36 new names have been entered on our books and 
4 boys have been returned to us for a few weeks' stay while satisfac- 
tory arrangements were being made for placing them out again. 
There have been no runaways for fifteen months and a general spirit 
of content seems to prevail. 

Only one of those sent to us has been returned to Westborough 
without a trial in a family. Of the 37 sent out, either to a family or 
to their own homes, 7 have drifted to Westborough, — 4 for serious 

1 One little foreign waif, who has had neither visit or letter from home since he came, 
has a little watermelon safely hidden away, to be kept for the lady trustee " who likes 
us little boys." 



38 FARMHOUSE REPORT LYMAJST SCHOOL. [Oct. 

misdemeanor and 3 to be again boarded out. The average time of 
detention in the school has been five and three- fourths months. This 
is greater than last year, owing, doubtless, to the two months scarlet- 
fever quarantine, when none were received or dismissed. Those 
going home from the school were detained nearly one year. 

Too much credit cannot be given to Mr. and Mrs. Dudley for the 
courage and fidelity shown in their management of the farm and 
school during my absence, including, as it did, the long time of quar- 
antine. To them is due the fact that the school in no way suffered 
from inefficient care and discipline. 

I am very grateful for the long rest granted me, which has renewed 
both strength and courage for the duties and opportunities await- 
ing me. 

This year as it passes to join the procession of its predecessors 
seems marked with unusual success, and to call for especial gratitude 
that health of body, content of mind and abundant crops form the 
basis of a good working capital for the coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EMILY L. WARNER. 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 39 



KEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OP 
LYMAN SCHOOL PROBATIONERS. 



lo the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools 

Herewith is respectfully presented a brief summary of the work of 
the department of visitation for the year 1902-1903, 

The total number of individuals on the visiting list of the department 
of visitation during the year ending Sept. 30, 19u3, was . . . 998 

Becoming of age during the year, 109 

Died, 5 

Returned to the school and not relocated : — 

For serious fault, 29 

Not serious, 19 

■ 48 

Total number passing out of our care during the year, . . 162 

Leaving on the visiting list, Oct. 1, 1903, 836 

This visiting list must not be confounded or compared with the total 
number of boys who have left the school and are not yet twenty-one years 
of age, given in Table 3 on page 49, which table includes those who have 
been discharged for one reason or another and are beyond our juris- 
diction, and whose" names, therefore, are not among those subject to 
visitation. Boys who have been transferred from the school to the 
Massachusetts Reformatory at Concord are not on the visiting list, the 
mittimus having been transferred with them, while the name* of those 
who are arrested and sentenced to the reformatory by the court are 
retained among the probationers. 

Classification of Visiting List. 
Of the foregoing 836 boys, 33 (not including those in the foreign 
service of the United States government) are classed as out of the 
State and employment unknown, 64 are on the unknown list. The 
occupations of the remaining 739 boys, with the number engaged in 
each employment, is shown in the following table : — 



40 VISITATION REPORT LXMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 



Army, United States, . 


23 


Farmers, 


Assisting parents, 


15 


Fireman, . ... 


Attending school, 


. 15 


Fisherman, . . . . 


At board and attending school, 


45 


Florist, 


Baker, .... 


. 3 


Gas works, . 


Barber, .... 


. 2 


Hat shop, 


Bell boy, .... 


2 


Heel factory, . 


Belt factory, 


. 2 


Hostler, . . . . . 


Bicycle shop, 


1 


Idle, ...... 


Blacksmith, 


1 


Insane, 


Bleachery, .... 


3 


Invalid, . . . . 


Book bindery, . 


1 


Iron works, . . . . 


Box factory, 


6 


Jeweller's shop, 


Bottling factory, 


2 


Laborer, 


Blacking factory, 


. 1 


Laundry, ...... 


Brass works, 


. 2 


Leather factory, 


Brick yard, . . . 


1 


Lime quarry, 


Button shop, 


. 2 


Lithographer, . 


Caretaker, .... 


. 1 


Machinist, 


Carpenter, .... 


11 


Mason, 


Carpet factory, . 


4 


Massachusetts Reformatory, 


Chair shop, 


1 


Market, 


Chain shop, 


1 


Mill (textile), . 


Cheese factory, . 


1 


Nail factory, . . . 


Cigar factory, . 


1 


Navy, United States, . 


Clerk, .... 


30 


Occupation unknown, 


Comb factory, . 


5 


Other public institutions, . 


Conductor, .... 


2 


Painter, 


Concreter, .... 


2 


Piano shop, . 


Cook, . . . . 


3 


Paper mill, . 


Cooper, .... 


1 


Pickle shop, . 


Cracker factory, 


2 


Pistol shop, . 


Detective, .... 


1 


Plumber, . . 


Electrician, 


6 


Printer, . . . . . 


Electric road, 


3 


Porter, 


Elevator boy, 


6 


Pump works, . 


Emery wheel factory, 


2 


Rattan factory, . 


Engraver, .... 


1 


Recently released, occupation 


Errand boy, 


8 


unknown, . . . . 


Express, . . . . . 


2 


Restaurant, . . .. . 


Eyelet factory, . 


1 


Rope walk, . . . . 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



41 



Rubber works, . 


4 


Suspender factory, 






1 


Sailor, .... 


5 


Teamster, . 






18 


Sandpaper factory, . 


2 


Theatre company, 






1 


Sash and blind factory, 


2 


Tinsmith, . 






2 


Ship builder, 


1 


Upholsterer, 






1 


Shoe shop, .... 


33 


Watch factory, . 






1 


Silver plating factory, 


1 


Wire mill, . 






4 


Stevedore, .... 


1 


Wood yard, 






1 


Stove maker, 


1 











Reduced to approximate percentages, this table will show : — 

Per Cent. 



In United States army and navy, about 








Q 1 
y 3 


Assisting parents, .... 
At board, 








2 
6 


Employed on farms, .... 
In mills (textile), about . 
Machinists, about, .... 








18 
6 
3 


Classed as laborers, about 








2 


Massachusetts Reformatory at Concord, 
In other public institutions, about 
In 87 different occupations, about 








6 

n 

46 



The report cards of the above-mentioned 739 boys show that at the 
time of the last report 652, or 88 J per cent., were doing well ; 29, or 
4 per cent., doubtfully ; and 59, or 8 per cent., including those while 
in our care sentenced by the court to the Massachusetts Reformatory 
or other public correctional institutions, badly. 

The number of boys whose whereabouts are unknown is less by 4 
than last year. This list is still large, but perhaps not relatively so. 
In 17 of these cases no members of the family to which they belong 
could be located. Probably many have left the State. kC Where- 
abouts unknown " does not always imply a runaway or a boy who 
is doing badly. 

An analysis of the unknown list shows that — 

26 disappeared this year. 
37 disappeared previously. 



And, again, that of this number 



28 left place with a farmer. 

18 left home or relatives. 

17 not located, family having moved. 



1 It will be noted that boys who have been transferred by vote of the trustees to the 
Massachusetts Reformatory and runaways from the school who have not been out on 
probation are excluded from these figures. 



42 VISITATION EEPOKT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

The following figures give the platings, returns, visits and collec- 
tions of wages for two years : — 





1903. 


1902. 


Placings. 






Number of boys placed in their homes when leav- 






ing the school, 


105 


130 


Number of boys placed with others when leaving 






the school, 


64 


88 


Number of boys boarded out when leaving the 






school, . 


38 


46 


Enlisted in the navy, . ' . . . . 


5 


7 


Total number placed out within the year and 






becoming subjects of visitation, 


212 


271 


Returns. 






Number of boys within the year returned to the 






school : — 






For serious fault, . 


29 


28 


For relocation and other purposes, 


55 


60 


Total returned, . . . . x 


84 


88 


Visits. 






Number of visits to probationers 


1,821 


1,823 


Number of visits to boys over eighteen years of age, 


864 


782 


Number of boys over eighteen years of age visited, 


535 


487 


Average visits to boys over eighteen years of age, 


1.6 


1.6 


Number of visits to boys under eighteen years of age, 


957 


1,041 


Number of boys under eighteen years of age visited, 


463 


448 


Average visits to boys under eighteen years of age, 


2.06 


2.3 


Number of homes investigated and reported upon 






in writing, 


246 


161 


Number of new places investigated and reported 






upon, . . 


31 


101 


Collections 






Amount of money collected and paid over to the 






Lyman School as wages of boys and placed to 






their credit, 


$2,569 86 


$2,615 90 


Number of boys 1 in behalf of whom money Was 






collected, 


67 


74 



1 Boys who are over eighteen are allowed to make their own bargains and collect and spend 
their wages. Money collected in behalf of boys under eighteen is placed to their credit in bank. 



The average number of visits paid to boys subsequently returned 
to the school this year, after having been away from the school on an 
average of five months, is three ; that is, such boys have been visited 
before their return on an average of once in seven weeks. Nine boys 
who, on account of their whereabouts being unknown, or because 
they stayed in place less than one month after leaving the school, 
were not visited at all. 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 43 

We have gone pretty carefully over the question whether, if these 
boys had been visited oftener, the result would have been different, 
or whether the number of visits they received were adequate to hold- 
ing any normal boy in place. We think that very few of these re- 
turned boys could have been kept in their places by more frequent 
visiting. To our mind, successful visiting means visiting with dis- 
cretion. Indiscreet visiting may result in as much harm as neglect 
to visit. The individual, his temperament, his surroundings and his 
family must all be considered in wise visiting. 

Aside from the above work, as indicated by these statistics, we 
have held weekly meetings at the Lyman School and have met the 
probation committee of your Board once a month. 

By the transfer of Mr. John H. Cummings, formerly partly em- 
ployed in visiting boys, to the placing, relocation and truancy work, 
the visiting is now left exclusively to Mr. Howe and myself. As a 
matter of fact, however, we continue to call upon Mr. Cummings in 
emergency cases, as before. For two men to properly visit and hold 
in mind nearly one thousand boys, scattered all over New England, 
seems, on its face, an impossibility, and it would be entirely impossi- 
ble should many emergency cases requiring prompt attention arise at 
the same time. As a matter of fact, such cases are comparatively 
infrequent, and it has been generally possible to give them the prompt 
attention they require. 

Again, the great increase of electric railways between towns here- 
tofore unprovided with convenient means of access has greatly facili- 
tated the work of visiting. In many localities a visitor now may do 
the work in one day which before such railway service could hardly 
be done in two. 

I regard the advantage of such facilities of transportation as equal 
to another visitor on the force with the same conditions as prevailed 
six years ago. Again, we have always regarded our correspondence 
with the boys as important, but this year, aside from the individual 
letters written by each visitor to his own boys, as may have seemed 
to him necessary, we have inaugurated a system of communication by 
letter with every boy whose whereabouts is known at the time of writ- 
ing. About 1,200 of such letters have been sent out from the office 
this year, and while these letters have been in circular form, they 
have been addressed to different classes of boys, a special letter to a 
class, as, for instance, letters to boys becoming twenty-one years of 
age ; boys at board and attending school ; boys at work in the country 
on a farm, and boys at their own home. The replies to these letters 
have been quite general and thoroughly satisfactory to this depart- 
ment, and we feel that we come down to the end of the year of 1903 
with a better knowledge and a firmer hold upon the probationers of 
the Lyman School than we have ever before possessed. 



44 VISITATION KEPOET LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

But the number of probationers is constantly increasing and the 
time must soon come, and I respectfully submit to your Board whether 
it is not already at hand, when another visitor is imperatively needed. 

One hundred and nine boys have become of age during the year. 
The following table shows their occupation and standing : — 



Army, 






11 


Laborer, .... 


4 


Bell boy, . 








Machinist, .... 


2 


Blacking factoiy, 








Massachusetts Reformatory, 


8 


Box shop, . 








Mill (textile), . 


5 


Brass works, 








Navy, 


13 


Carpenter, . 








Other institutions, 


3 


Carpet mill, 








Out of State, . , . 


2 


Clerk, 








Painter, .... 


1 


Collector, . 








Printer, .... 


2 


Commercial traveller 


» 






Porter, 


1 


Conductor, 








Restaurant, 


1 


Counter shop, . 








Sailor, .... 


1 


Express, . 








Shoe shop, .... 


4 


Electric supplies, 








Stone cutter, 


1 


Farmer, 








Teamster, .... 


8 


Fireman, . 








Vegetable peddler, . 


1 


Freight yard, 








Wire mill, .... 


1 


Glass cutter, 








Wood carver, 


1 


Hostler, . 








Unknown, .... 


12 


Invalid, 













The above table expressed in percentages, shows : — 

United States army and navy, about .... 

Employed on farms, about 

In other penal institutions (including Massachusetts 

Reformatory), 

Employed in textile mills, 



Per Cent. 

22 
8 

10 
4 



The remaining 56 per cent, is divided among thirty-one different 
occupations. 

By our usual classification of boys becoming twenty-one years of 
age, 71, or 65 per cent., are doing well without question; 14, or 13 
percent., not so well, but honestly self-supporting; 11, or 10 per 
cent., badly, all in penal institutions; 13, or 12 per cent., whose 
whereabouts are unknown. 

Instead of histories of certain boys which we have given in a few 
previous reports, I beg leave to submit a few letters, before referred 
to, which carry with them their own interpretation. 



.1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 45 

The following letter was received last winter from a boy now in a 
country place and attending a district school. He came to the school 
before he was ten years of age, remained in the Berlin branch five 
months, and, having shown himself a tractable boy, was placed in 
the country. He was a city boy and had intemperate parents. His 
offence was larceny. The letter breathes of the country and of all 
its healthful and moral influences. 

Dec. 21, 1902. 

Mr. Wheeler. 

Dear Sir : — I will try and answer your letter. I go to school every 
day. I study arithmetic, reading and spelling. I have not missed any 
words in spelling since I came here. I just like to go to.school. 

I like my teacher very much. I like to have good lessons. I like to 

play and slide and skate. I like to live in . 

From your little friend, 



The following is an extract from a letter which was received from 
a boy of seventeen who was committed for vagrancy and who had 
spent some time in other institutions. His parents are dead. He 
spent one year and eight months in the Lyman School and was placed 
on a farm quite remote from the school. 

, Feb. 8, 1903. 

Dear Sir : — I received your letter and was pleased to hear from you. 
I have read the letter over two or three times and find a lot of good in it. 
I am very thankful to you for putting me in such a good home ; Mr. and 

Miss are very pleasant to me and I don't think that there is a better 

home in the whole State. I will answer your questions. I can say that I 
enjoy life in the country first rate, and I always have liked country life. 

I am especially interested in stock. I like the horses the best and our 
dog Prince next. ... I like agricultural reading the best of any. I hope 
some day to be a farmer for myself. I am well and I haven't even had a 
headache while I've been here. I'll be here a year the 4th of April, but it 
doesn't seem long. I hope to live long enough to see my time out and 
have the people say, There's a boy that is good for something. I am 
perfectly contented and enjoy myself ever so much. I hope my letter will 
find you well and in extra health. I will try my best to do what is right 
and just. 

Hoping you will write me soon, 

Your friend, 



Still another letter is one of many of similar tenor received from 
boys who became twenty-one years of age during the year. 

This boy was committed for a serious offence and had been in 
another correctional institution. He came to the school at the age 
of fourteen years, and after spending one year and eight months in 
the Lyman School was released to go home on probation. Here he 
was visited as often as seemed necessary. 



46 YISITATIOX REPORT LILIAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 



, dec. 19, 1902. 

Mr. Wheeler. 

Dear Sir: — I will say in answer to your letter received by me that 
I will be twenty-one years of age on February 20 next. My occupation at 
present is that of moulding leather, but I do not intend to stay at it per- 
manently. It is my ambition to secure an engineer's license, as I think I 
should like that kind of work and have some knowledge of it. I can 
remember those who have visited me with nothing but kindly feeling, and 
know that any suggestions they may have made were for my own welfare, 
and I think Mr. Howe will say that I did not cause him much trouble 
looking after me. I have been home more than five years now and have 

been a member of the church over three years. My health is fairly 

good. Please remember me to the officers of Chauncy Hall. 
Yours very truly, 

P. S. — I am very much obliged to you for your interest in my welfare 
and you may rest assured that I appreciate it. 

Scores of other letters of like import are on our files at the school 
and afford willing testimony to the effectiveness of the work of all 
departments of the Lyman School. 



Financial Statement, 1903.- 
Expended for : — 

Salaries of visitors, 
Office furniture, . 
Office assistance, . 
Telephone service, 
Travelling expenses, 
Stationery and postage, 



$3,575 £0 


158 20 


141 92 


82 80 


3,466 79 


104 55 



$7,529 26 



Respectfully submitted, 



WALTER A. WHEELER, 

Superintendent of Lyman School Probationers. 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 47 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 






To the Trustees of the Lyman School for Boys. 

The past year has been an eventful one. We had, during the 
winter, the most serious epidemic the school has ever known. There 
were twenty-two cases of scarlet-fever, several of them very serious 
cases, including two which were fatal. Because of the lack of hos- 
pital accommodations, the Maple cottage boys were moved to another 
house and Maple was converted into an isolation hospital. Sore 
throats continued prevalent all winter, and it was not thought best 
to give up the temporary hospital until the first of May. The poor 
accommodations made it extremely difficult to check so serious an 
epidemic. Great credit is due the officers of the school for the assist- 
ance they rendered and the uncomplaining way in which they per- 
formed their extra duties. 

We have had two severe cases of pneumonia, one case of pericar- 
ditis following a slight attack of rheumatism, a case of chicken-pox 
with high fever and extensive eruption. Several boys have been sent 
to the Massachusetts General Hospital for operations and several to 
the Eye and Ear Infirmary. 

A third fatal case during the year was the result of septic infection. 
Accidents have been rather frequent, resulting in two broken legs, 
two broken arms and many sprains and cuts. 

The past winter demonstrated more forcibly than ever before the 
urgent need of hospital accommodations. We are therefore very glad 
that a new hospital is being built. With the improved sanitary con- 
ditions and a well-equipped hospital we trust that the amount of sick- 
ness will be lessened and better care given those who are sick. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. H. AYER. 



48 STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 



STATISTICS CONCERNING BOYS. 



Table No. 1. 



Number received and leaving the School during the Tear ending Sept. 

30, 1903. 
Boys in school Sept. 30, 1902, ....... 317 

Received. — Since committed, . 174 

Returned from places, 61 

Returned " boarded-out " boys, . . . .16 
Returned Berlin boys, not boarded out, . . .5 

Recommitted, 2 

Runaways recaptured, . . . ... .40 

Returned from Massachusetts General Hospital, . 3 
Returned from Eye and Ear Infirmary, ... 5 

306 

Whole number in school during the year, 623 x 

Released. — On probation to parents, 105 

On probation to others, . . . . . .64 

Boarded out, . . 38 

Transferred to Massachusetts Reformatory, . . 15 

Runaways, .56* 

Discharged, . . . . . . . .3 

Enlisted in army and navy, 5 

Massachusetts General Hospital, .... 3 

Died, 3 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, ... 4 

George Junior Republic, 1 

Returned to court, over age, 1 

Massachusetts School for Feeble-minded, . . 3 

Insane hospital, 1 

Hospital for Epileptics, 1 

303 

Remaining in the school Sept. 30, 1903, 320 

1 This represents 549 individuals. 

2 There were 54 other runaways who were brought back so promptly that they were 
not recorded as absent from the institution. 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



49 



Table No. 2. 
Monthly Admissions, Releases and Average Number of Inmates. 



MONTHS. 



Admitted. 



Released, 



Average No. 



October, . 

November, 

December, 

January, . 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, . 

August, . 

September, 

Totals, 



35 
23 
26 
10 
14 
27 
36 
20 
28 
23 
30 
34 



306 



17 
27 
22 
12 
12 
32 
52 
30 
16 
23 
27 
33 



303 



325.77 
330.93 
338.43 
333.93 
333.50 
333.00 
316.23 
307.09 
312.47 
315.09 
317.94 
316.13 



323.37 



Table No. 3. 

A. Showing the Status of All Boys under Twenty -one whose Names 
were on the Books of the Lyman School Sept. 30, 1903. 

In the school, 320 

Released from the school : — 

With parents, 381 

With others, . . . / 129 

For themselves, 58 

At board, 45 

Sentenced to Massachusetts Reformatory : — 

This year, 24 

Former years, 19 

43 

Sentenced to penal institutions other than the Massa- 
chusetts Reformatory, ........ 13 

In insane hospital, 2 

Left the State, 29 

In United States army, 23 

In United States navy, 49 

Lost sight of : — 

This year, 31 

Previously, 33 

64 

836 



50 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Still legally in custody, but beyond practical control : — 

George Junior Republic, .3 

Runaways from the school, whereabouts unknown, . . 34 
Runaways, known to be in other institutions or in the navy, 9 

Discharged from the care of the school : — 

Returned to court as over age limit, 6 

Discharged as unfit subjects, to parents, .... 8 
Discharged as unfit subjects, to State Board of Charity, . 1 
Discharged to parents to go out of the State, ... 5 
In Massachusetts School for Feeble-minded, . . . .13 
Transferred to Massachusetts Reformatory, . . . .31 
Transferred to hospitals or almshouses, .... 5 
Dead, 10 



Total. 



46 



79 



1,281 



B. Showing Condition by Ages of All Boys outside the School, but 

subject to its Custody. 
Condition of all boys under twenty-one on probation up to Oct. 1, 1903 : — 

Doing well, 639 or 70 per cent. 

Not doing well, 26 or 3 per cent. 

Have been in some other penal institution, . . 109 or 12 per cent. 

Out of the State, 29 or 3 per cent. 

Whereabouts and condition unknown, . . . 107 or 12 per cent. 

Total, 910 

Condition of boys under twenty-one on probation one year or more : — 

Doing well, 496 or 70 per cent. 

Not doing well, 22 or 3 per cent. 

Have been in some other penal institution, . . 91 or 13 per cent. 

Out of the State, 28 or 4 per cent. 

Whereabouts and conditions unknown, . . . 73 or 10 per cent. 

Total, 710 

Condition of boys under twenty-one on probation two years or more : — 

Doing well, 366 or 70 per cent. 

Not doing well, . 8 or 1 per cent. 

Have been in some other penal institution, . . 79 or 15 per cent. 

Out of the State, 19 or 4 per cent. 

Whereabouts and conditions unknown, . . . 54 or 10 per cent. 

Total 526 



1 One of these has run away from that institution. 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



51 



Condition of all boys under twenty-one on probation who complete their 
nineteenth year before Oct. 1, 1903 : — 

Doing well, 184 or 66 per cent. 

Not doing well, 6 or 2 per cent. 

Have been in some other penal institution, . . 40 or 14 per cent. 

Out of the State, 13 or 5 per cent. 

Whereabouts and conditions unknown, . . . 36 or 13 per cent. 



Total, 



279 



Condition of all boys under twenty-one who complete their twentieth year 



before Oct. 1, 1903 : — 

Doing well,. 

Not doing well, 

Have been in some other penal institution, 

Out of the State, 

Whereabouts and conditions unknown, . 



Total, 



85 or 65 per cent. 

1 or 1 per cent. 
22 or 17 per cent. 

5 or 3 per cent. 
18 or 14 per cent. 

131 



Condition of all boys who complete their twenty-first year before Oct. 1, 



1903: — 

Doing well, 

Not doing well, 

Have been in other penal institutions, 

Out of the State 

Lost track of : — 
Doing well at last accounts, 
Not doing well at last accounts, . 



70 or 58 per cent. 

2 or 2 per cent. 
35 or 29 per cent. 

1 or 1 per cent. 



13 or 10 per cent, 



Total, 



121 1 



C. Visitation of Probationers. 
Visits made by agents of the school, . 
Visits made by trustees, 



1,813 



1,821 



Of the 1,821 visits, 864 were made to 535 boys over eighteen and 957 to 463 

boys under eighteen. 
Whole number of names on the visiting list for the year, . . . 998 

Investigation of homes by agents, 246 

Investigation of places by agents, . ;;i 

$2,569.86 have been collected in behalf of 67 boys. 

1 The report of the Superintendent of Probationers on page 44 gives the number attain- 
ing majority as 109,-5 runaways from the school and 7 boys transferred to the Massa- 
chusetts Reformatory being excluded from the list of probationers. 



52 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 4. 

Commitments from the Several Counties, Past Year and previously. 



COUNTIES. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Totals. 


Barnstable, 


1 


66 


67 


Berkshire, 














9 


271 


280 


Bristol, . 














16 


767 


783 


Dukes, 














- 


18 


18 


Essex, 














26 


1,243 


1,269 


Franklin, . 














1 


68 


69 


Hampden, 














10 


508 


518 


Hampshire, 














2 


104 


106 


Middlesex, 














36 


1,529 


1,565 


!Nantucket, 














_ 


17 


17 


Norfolk, . 














7 


510 


517 


Plymouth, 














5 


158 


163 


Suffolk, . 














39 


1,730 


1,769 


Worcester, 














22 


923 


945 


Totals, 














174 


7,912 


8,086 



Table No. 5. 

Nativity of Parents of Boys committed during the Past Ten Tears. 





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* 


30 


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Fathers born in the United States, 


15 


18 


13 


16 


8 


8 


16 


18 


20 


23 


Mothers born in the United States, 


17 


11 


14 


15 


28 


21 


15 


19 


19 


8 


Fathers foreign born, .... 


9 


7 


8 


12 


25 


18 


12 


17 


17 


8 


Mothers foreign born 


17 


25 


6 


11 


10 


17 


16 


15 


14 


24 


Both parents born in United States, 


18 


31 


27 


23 


31 


27 


36 


47 


52 


48 


Both parents foreign born, 


59 


61 


51 


34 


56 


47 


90 


83 


80 


71 


Unknown, 


32- 


34 


34 


'64 


45 


44 


11 


14 


17 


17 


One parent unknown, .... 


20 


25 


23 


32 


33 


36 


13 


13 


22 


13 


Per cent, of American parentage, . 


24 


29 


28 


31 


27 


25 


30 


35 


37 


36 


Per cent, of foreign parentage, 


50 


42 


40 


37 


40 


39 


60 


54 


40 


50 


Per cent, unknown, .... 


26 


29 


32 


32 


33 


36 


10 


11 


14 


14 



Nativity of Boys committed during the Past Ten Years. 



Born in United States, 
Foreign born, . 
Unknown, 



110 


130 


115 


103 


146 


130 


142 


158 


167 


32 


35 


29 


20 


33 


37 


30 


24 


26 


- 


2 


- 


1 


5 


1 


1 


3 


2 



153 
18 

3 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



53 



Table No. 6. 
Authority for Commitments during the Past Tear. 



COMMITMENTS. 



Past Year. 



By district court, 
municipal court, 
police court, 
superior court, 
trial justices, 
State Board, 

Total, . 



83 

37 

38 

5 

5 

7 



174 



Table No. 7. 
Age of Boys when committed, Past Year and previously. 



AGE. 


Committed 

during 
Past Year. 


Committed 

from 
1885 to 1902. 


Committed 

previous to 

1885. 


Totals. 


Six, 


_ 


_ 


5 


5 


Seven, . 








- 


- 


25 


25 


Eight, . 








- 


8 


115 


123 


Nine, . 








1 


14 


231 


246 


Ten, .... 








7 


62 


440 


509 


Eleven, 








16 


138 


615 


769 


Twelve, 








26 


355 


748 


1,129 


Thirteen, 








48 


653 


897 


1,598 


Fourteen, . 








70 


1,070 


778 


1,918 


Fifteen, 








5 


67 


913 


985 


Sixteen, 








1 


12 


523 


586 


Seventeen, . 








- 


3 


179 


182 


Eighteen and over, 








- 


- 


17 


17 


Unknown, . 








- 


12 


32 


44 


Totals, . 


174 


2,3!) 1 


5,518 


8,086 



54 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 8. 

Domestic Condition of Boys committed to the School during the Year. 

Had parents, 101 

no parents, 11 

father, 29 

mother, 33 

step-father, 15 

step-mother, 8 

intemperate father, 60 

intemperate mother, 3 

both parents intemperate, .8 

parents separated, 8 

attended church, 173 

never attended church, 1 

not attended school within one year, 16 

not attended school within two years, 6 

not attended school within three years, . . . . . . 4 

been arrested before, 108 

been inmates of other institutions, . . 48 

used intoxicating liquor, 14 

used tobacco, 119 

Were employed in the mill or otherwise when arrested, ... 44 

Were attending school, . . .62 

Were idle, 68 

Parents owning residence, .28 

Members of the family had been arrested, ...... 61 



Table No. 9. 
Length of Detention of the 247 Boys who have left during the Year. 



3 months or less, . . .11 


1 year 4 months, . . .10 


4 months, 




. 13 


1 year 5 months, 






11 


5 months, 






; 7 


1 year 6 months, 






10 


6 months, 






. 7 


1 year 7 months, 






16 


7 months, 






. 5 


1 year 8 months, 






13 


8 months, 






. 3 


1 year 9 months, 






8 


9 months, 






. 2 


1 year 10 months, 






6 


10 months, 






. 3 


1 year 11 months, 






9 


11 months, 






. 1 


2 years, . 






4 


12 months, 






. 7 


2 years 1 month, 






3 


1 year 1 month, 




. 10 


2 years 2 months, . 






5 


1 year 2 months, 




. 12 


2 years 3 months, 






2 


1 year 3 months, 




. 25 


2 years 4 months, 






6 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



55 



Table No. 9 — Concluded. 



2 years 5 months, 
2 years 6 months, 
2 years 7 months, 
2 years 8 months, 
2 years 9 months, 
2 years 10 months, 

2 years 11 months, 

3 years, . 



3 years 1 month, 
3 years 4 months, 
3 years 6 months, 
3 years 8 months, 

3 years 9 months, 

4 years or more, 

Total, . 



1 
2 

7 

247 



Average time spent in the 
Average time spent in the 



institution, . 

institution of boarded boys, 



Average time spent in the institution of probationers not 
boarded, released for the first time, 



19.03 months. 
6.84 months. 

17.98 months. 



Table No. 10. 

Comparative Table, showing Average Numbers of Inmates, New 
Commitments, Returns and Releases by Probation or Otherivise 
for Ten Tears. 








Average 
Number. 


New Com- 
mitments. 


Returned 

for 
Any Cause. 


Placed on 
Probation. 


Discharged 
Otherwise. 


1893-94, 










228.00 


142 


53 


124 


75 


1894-95, 










246.73 


167 


79 


188 


28 


1895-96, 










264.61 


144 


88 


212 


16 


1896-97, 










261.87 


124 


73 


170 


38 


1897-98, 










279.42 


184 


102 


201 


46 


1898-99, 










295.52 


168 


107 


227 


55 


1899-1900, 










299.65 


173 


115 


242 


36 


1900-1901, 










303.89 


185 


107 


' 208 


56 


1901-1902, 










310.19 


195 


104 


264 


45 


1902-1903, 










323.37 


174 


132 


208 


95 


Average 


for t< 


snye 


ars, 


281.32 


165.6 


96 


204.4 


49 



56 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 11. 
Commitments by Months for Ten Years. 





1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


1899. 


1900. 


1901. 


1903. 


1903. 


October, . 


18 


18 


10 


10 


18 


21 


15 


31 


13 


23 


November, 


11 


9 


6 


10 


12 


15 


18 


12 


13 


14 


December, 


9 


' 7 


11 


9 


10 


9 


14 


7 


9 


11 


January, . 


16 


5 


9 


8 


11 


13 


8 


15 


10 


4 


February, 


8 


10 


7 


9 


12 


8 


12 


8 


21 


3 


March, 


16 


14 


15 


11 


12 


12 


19 


17 


16 


15 


April, 


9 


18 


10 


11 


15 


14 


14 


11 


21 


22 


May, 


15 


12 


9 


7 


21 


14 


12 


11 


21 


15 


June, 


13 


22 


13 


6 


13 


10 


20 


11 


19 


17 


July, 


4 


20 


23 


9 


22 


22 


13 


15 


20 


15 


August, . 


12 


16 


23 


13 


17. 


15 


14 


29 


13 


18 


September, 


11 
142 


16 


8 


21 


21 


15 


14 


18 


19 


17 


Totals, . 


167 


144 


124 


184 


168 


173 


185 


195 


174 



Table No. 12. 
Offences for which Boys were committed during the Tear. 



Assault, .... 


. 3 


Receiving stolen property, 


1 


Breaking and entering, 


44 


Stubbornness, . 


47 


Burglary, .... 


1 


State Board, 


2 


Habitual absentee, . 


5 


Unlawfully taking an animal, 


1 


Idle and disorderly, . 


1 


Vagrancy, .... 


4 


Illegal appropriation of horse, 


1 


Violating rules of truant school, 


4 


Larceny, .... 


58 







Obstructing railroad track, 


1 


Total, 


IV 4 


Running away, . 


1 







1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



57 



Table No. 13. — Some Comparative Statistics. 

A. Showing the Average Age of Boys released on Probation for the 

Past Ten Years. 





Years. 




Years. 


1894, . 


. 14.94 


1899, . 


. 15.17 


1895, ... 


. 15.49 


1900, . 


. 15.31 


1896, . 


. 15.17 


1901, . 


. 15.50 


1897, . 


. 15.15 


1902, . 


. 14.42 


1898, . 


. 15.60 


1903, . 


. 14.50 



B. Shoiving the Average Time spent in the Institution for the Past 

Ten Years. 





Months. 




Months. 


1894, . 


. 16.95 


1899, . 


. 20.40 


1895, . 


. 21.17 


1900, . 


. 19.27 


1896, . 


. . . 18.03 


1901, . 


. 20.25 


1897, . 


. 21.00 


1902, . 


. 19.53 


1898, . 


. 19.90 


1903, . 


. 19.03 



C. Showing the Average Age of Commitment for the Past Ten Years. 



Years. 

1894, 13.87 

1895, 13.44 

1896 13.63 

1897, 13.31 

1898 13.17 



1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 



Years. 

13.48 
13.08 
13.70 
13.38 
13.51 



58 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



D. Showing the Number of Boys returned to the School for Any 
Cause for Ten Years. 



1894, 33 

1895, 60 

1896, 87 

1897, 73 

1898, 102 



1899, . . . ' , . .107 

1900, 115 

1901, 107 

1902 104 

1903, 132 



E. Showing Weekly Per Capita Cost of the Institution for Ten Tears. 





Gross. 


Net. 




Gross. 


Net. 


1894, . 


$4 75 


$4 67 


1899, . • . 


f 4 39 


$4 36 


1895, . 


4 46 


4 36 


1900, . 


4 73 


4 70 


1896, . 


4 61 


4 55 


1901, . . . 


4 47 


4 45 


1897, . 


4 72 


4 66 


1902, . 


4 54 


4 47 


1898, . 


4 52 


4 49 


1903, . 


4 74 


4 72 






1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



59 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 






Current Expenses of the Institution 

1902. — October, received from the State Treasurer, 

November, " " " " 

December, " " " " 

1903. — January, 

February, " " " 

March, " " " " 

April, " " " 

May, " " " " 

June, " " " " 

July, " " " " 

August, " " " " 

September, " " " " 





f6,688 90 




4,832 15 




8,697 32 




12,355 70 




7,729 16 




5,684 20 




5,958 68 




5,023 10 




6,284 44 




5,574 20 




5,746 98 




5,301 67 




$79,876 50 



Bills paid as per Vouchers at the State Treasury. 

1902. — Ootober $6,688 90' 

November, 4,832 15 

December, 8,697 32 

1903. — January, 12,355 70 

February, 7,729 16 

March, 5,684 20 

April, 5,958 68 

May, 5,023 10 

June, 6,284 44 

July, 5,574 20 

August, 5,746 98 

September, 5,301 67 

$79,876 50 

Amounts drawn from the State Treasury. 

Appropriation (Acts of 1902, Chapter 75) for Boarding. 

1902.— December, f 1,357 24 



60 FINANCIAL STATEMENT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct, 



Appropriation (Acts of 1903, Chapter 84) for Boarding. 

1903. — March, $1,164 71 

June, 1,235 28 

September, 1,083 15 

$3,483 14 

Appropriation (Acts of 1901, Chapter 76) for Sewage. 

1902. — December, $2,267 56 

1903. — January, 1,371 36 

March, . . 492 45 

May 384 64 

$4,516 01 

Appropriation (Acts of 1902, Chapter 90) for Sewage. 

1902. — October, $1,204 46 

November, . 2,415 54 

December, . 2,380 00 

$6,000 00 

Appropriation (Acts of 1902, Chapter 125) for Pumping. 
1902. — November, $197 01 

Appropriation (Acts of 1902, Chapter 125) for Electrical Improvements. 

1902. — November, $2,601 23 

December, x 2,985 04 

$5,586 27 

Appropriation (Acts of 1903, Chapter 90) for Hospital. 

1903. — July, $724 64 

August, 1,101 79 

September, •.',". 1,695 43 

$3,521 86 

Appropriation (Acts of 1903, Chapter 90) for Office Addition and School 

Building Porches. 
1903. — September, $220 65 

Expenditures. 

Bills paid as per Vouchers at the State Treasury (Acts of 1902, Chapter 75) 

for Boarding. 
1902. — December, $1,357 24 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 61 

Appropriation {Acts of 1903, Chapter 84) for Boarding. 

1903. — March, $1,164 71 

June, '. 1,235 28 

September, 1,083 15 

$3,483 14 

Appropriation {Acts of 1901, Chapter 76) for Sewage. 

1902. — December, $2,267 56 

1903. — January, 1,371 36 

March, 492 45 

May, 384 64 

$4,516 01 

Appropriation {Acts of 1902, Chapter 90) for Sewage. 

1902. — October, . . . $1,204 46 

November, 2,415 54 

December, 2,380 00 

$6,000 00 

Appropriation {Acts of 1902, Chapter 125) for Pumping. 
1902. — November $197 01 

Appropriation {Acts of 1902, Chapter 125) for Electrical Improvements. 

1902. — November, $2,601 23 

December, . . 2,985 04 

$5,586 27 

Appropriation {Acts of 1903, Chapter 90) for Hospital. 

1903. — July, $724 64 

August, 1,101 79 

September, 1,G95 43 

$3,521 86 

Appropriation {Acts of 1903, Chapter 90) for Office Addition and School 

' Building Porches. 
1903. — September, $220 65 



62 FINANCIAL STATEMENT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 



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1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



63 



Average Cost per Boy per Day (in Cents and Mills) . 





Salaries, Wages and 




■O-S 




'O 


s 


TS 










Labor. 






«fe 




d 




es 






FOR THE 

TEAR 
ENDING — 


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9 


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Sept. 30, 1899, . 


.095 


.072 


.083 


.252 


.100 


.051 


.018 


.077 


.038 


.051 


.039 


.628 


Sept. 30, 1900, . 


.102 


.072 


.086 


.260 


.102 


.065 


.021 


.075 


.057 


.049 


.050 


.675 


Sept. 30, 1901, . 


.087 


.063 


.099 


.249 


.102 


.047 


.022 


.062 


.062 


.060 


.034 


.638 


Sept. 30, 1902, . 


.081 


.077 


.090 


.248 


.112 


.057 


.019 


.074 


.046 


.048 


.055 


.649 


Sept. 30, 1903, . 


.075 


.073 


.100 


.248 


.099 


.042 


.022 


.085 


.040 


.064 


.077 


.677 



Cash Receipts paid into the State Treasury. 

Farm produce sales, $ 336 89 

Miscellaneous sales, 49 91 

Labor of boys, 22 10 

Total, $408 90 



64 



SUMMAKY LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



SUMMAEY OF FAEM ACCOUNT 

For Twelve Months ending Sept. 30, 1903. 



Dr. * 
Live stock, agricultural implements and farm produce on 

hand, as appraised Sept. 30, 1902, $11,132 90 

Board, 273 00, 

Farm tools and repairs, 747 53 

Fertilizers, 884 57 

Grain and meal for stock, 2,922 60 

Horse and cattle shoeing, 119 36 

Labor of boys, . - 785 00 

Live stock purchases, 1,429 20 

Seeds and plants, . . x 480 51 

Veterinary services, 208 92 

Wages . . . . 1,085 51 

Rent, 310 00 

$20,379 10 
Cr. 

Produce sold, $336 89 

Produce consumed, 8,171 35 

Produce on hand, 5,412 34 

Live stock, . 3,693 70 

Agricultural implements, 2,293 24 

$19,907 52 
Net loss * . 471 58 

$20,379 10 
Poultry Account. 

Dr. 

To fowl and feed, as appraised Sept. 30, 1902, . $ 490 95 

feed, 161 87 

net gain, 45 80 

$698 62 

Cr. 

By eggs and poultry used and sold, . . . $303 37 

fowl, feed, incubators, etc., as appraised 

Sept. 30, 1903, 395 25 

$698 62 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 65 



SUMMARY OF PROPERTY OF THE LYMAN 

SCHOOL. 



Real Estate 
Seventy-three acres tillage land, . 
Eleven acres pasture and woodland, 
Seventy-two acres Wilson land, fifteen acres past- 
ure and meadow, .... 
Willow Park land, three acres, 
Three-fourths of an acre Brady land, 
One hundred acres Berlin land (60 acres pasturage 

and meadow), . . . . ■ . . . 1,100 00 



$13,600 00 
1,100 00 

5,100 00 
1,500 CO 
1,100 00 



Buildings. 
Superintendent's house and office, .... $10,000 00 

Theodore Lyman hall, 38,000 00 

Maple cottage, 3,700 00 

Willow Park, 5,000 00 

Wayside cottage, 5,900 00 

Hillside, 15,000 00 

Oak, 16,000 00 

Bowlder, 17,000 00 

The Inn, 1,000 00 

The Gables 9,000 00 

Bakery building, 8,600 00 

Berlin farmhouse, 3,000 00 

Berlin barns and sheds, 1,500 00 

Schoolhouse, 40,000 00 

Laundry and electric power building, . . . 17,000 00 

Greenhouse, 1,600 00 

Hen houses, 1,000 00 

Tool house (Bowlder), 

Ice house, 

Scale house, 

Piggery building, 

Cow barn, 

Horse barn, 

Hospital building (in process of construction), 

Amount carried forward, .... 



$23,500 00 



20 00 




20 00 




400 00 




100 00 




11,500 00 




2,700 00 




3,500 00 






2ll,540J00 




. 


$235,040 00 



66 SUMMARY LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

Amount brought forward, $235,040 00 

Personal Estate. 

Beds and bedding, $5,709 66 

Other furniture, 13,462 73 

Carriages, 1,015 60 

Agricultural implements, 2,293 24 

Dry goods, 2,985 72 

Drugs and surgical instruments, .... 492 40 

Fuel and oil, 1,215 13 

Library, 2,841 90 

Live stock, 3,693 70 

Mechanical tools and appliances, .... 19,198 74 

Provisions and groceries, 1,595 07 

Produce on hand, 5,412 34 

Ready-made clothing, . . . . . . 5,637 94 

Raw materials, . . . . . . . 3,414 65 

68,968 82 



$304,008 82 



M. EVERETT HOWARD, 

Appraiser. 

A true copy. Attest : T. F. Chapin, Superintendent. 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



67 



LIST OF SALAEIED OFFICERS NOW 
EMPLOYED. 



Theodore F. Chapin, superintendent, 

Maria B. Chapin, matron, .... 

Walter M. Day, assistant superintendent, 1 . 

Mable B. Teasdale, amanuensis, 1 

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Merrill, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Tilton, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Hallier, charge of family, 

Mr. E. A. Dibbell, charge of family and storeroom 

Miss Susie E. Wheeler, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Pettengill, charge of family and sewing 

room, 

Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Lasselle, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. Thaddeus Hale, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. F. B. Lougee, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Morton, charge of family 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Mason, charge of family, 

Emily L. Warner, charge of Berlin farm, . 

Mr. and Mrs. I. G. Dudley, assistants at Berlin farm 

Joseph A. Puffer, principal, 

Anna L. Wilcox, teacher of sloyd, 

Mary F. Wilcox, teacher of sloyd, 

Fannie II. Wheelock, teacher of drawing, 

Elizabeth R. Kimball, teacher of music, . 

James D. Littlefield, supervisor of manual training, 1 

Alliston Greene, teacher of physical drill and printing, 

Lydia R. Ililler, teacher, .... 

Emma F. Newton, teacher, 

Flora J. Dyer, teacher, .... 

Jennie L. Kimball, teacher, 

Nellie F. Stone, teacher, .... 

Sadie M. Knight, teacher, .... 

Mary A. Bridgham, teacher, 

Hattie A. Wiggin, teacher, .... 

Mrs. Florence Land, charge of central kitchen, 

Mrs. Clara A. Middlemas, charge of bakery, 

Cora L. Carey, laundry matron, 



$2,300 00 


400 00 


1,100 00 


416 00 


800 00 


600 00 


800 00 


600 00 


300 00 


900 00 


750 00 


800 00 


800 00 


600 00 


850 00 


600 00 


800 00 


1,000 00 


800 00 


600 00 


600 00 


500 00 


1,100 00 


1,000 00 


400 00 


400 00 


400 00 


400 00 


400 00 


375 00 


300 00 


350 00 


400 00 


400 00 


400 00 



1 Board themselves. 



68 OFFICERS LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 1903. 

Mabel G. Moore, housekeeper, superintendent's house, . . $300 00 

Lillia V. Burhoe, assistant matron, superintendent's house, . 250 00 

James W. Clark, engineer, 900 00 

Irving A. Nourse, assistant engineer and electrician, 1 . . . 800 00 

John T. Perkins, driver, . 400 00 

Thomas T. Carey, watchman, . 400 00 

Frank M. Cockburn, farmer, 800 00 

Henry J. Couper, teamster, 400 00 

Thomas H. Ayer, M.D., physician, 600 00 

Charles A. Lakin, dentist, 300 00 

, nurse 400 00 

Alexander Quackenboss, M.D., oculist, . , . . . . 105 76 

Advisory Physicians, unpaid. 
Orville F. Rogers, M.D. Richard C. Cabot, M.D. James S. Stone, M.D. 

1 Board themselves. 



Appendix B. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



State Industrial School foe Giels 



LANCASTER, 






SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and State Industrial School for Girls. 

The year has been a busy one. The furnishing and opening of the 
Bolton annex in June was closely followed by new buildings and im- 
provements : a hospital ; a cattle barn ; additional baths in four of 
the older cottages and the farmhouse ; remodelling the superintendent's 
house ; sewage for Bolton ; and minor repairs. 

The hospital, accommodating 15, provides general and private 
wards. A hospital matron will be in constant attendance. From 
here the newly committed girl, fresh from the bath and newly fitted 
with clothes, will be received into the family cottage. Here a simply 
equipped dentist room will meet the long-felt need of closer attention 
to the teeth. A well-fitted dispensary and doctor's office are also 
provided. 

An ample supply of hay produced on the school farm and a barn 
accommodating 50 cows solves many an economic food problem. 

With the increased families, additional balhs and toilet accommo- 
dations in the older cottages has become a necessity. The repairs on 
the superintendent's house, including raising eighteen inches, a new 
cellar under entire building, new plumbing and heating, added rooms, 
baths and lavatories within, porticoes without, completed, will give a 
comfortable, convenient and attractive house. 

The Bolton branch has already found a valuable place in the insti- 
tution. In providing for a class of girls whose tendencies demand 
a longer stay in the school, it is proposed that during this stay they 
render the State some substantial return. To this end, work lias 
already begun toward turning the Bolton farm, admirably adapted as 
it is for such culture, into a small fruitage and fowl farm; the girls, 
under direction, to care for the fowl and assist in cultivation of the 
fruits. Berries, plums, pears and peaches, eggs and fowl can here 
be produced in quantities sufficient for the consumption of the entire 
school. 

The removal of the worst class of girls to Bolton, and placing the 
backward girls together in another cottage on the Lancaster School 
grounds, has made possible an approach to grading in our schoolroom 
work. Teachers of normal training and previous experience in grade 
work have been secured. From time to time they have in turn given 



72 SUPT.'S EEPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

to teachers and pupils of the entire school, assembled in chapel, 
model lessons in history, geography, nature study and literature. 
This means a marked gain in this department over last year. The 
special music teacher has made it possible to choose the regular school- 
room teacher with an eye to her general qualifications rather than 
special acquirement in music. 

The results in sloyd introduced last November have exceeded our 
anticipations. In this the work is so graded that each girl has four 
lessons weekly for six months of her first year with us ; this is pre- 
paratory to her domestic training. It is interesting to note the really 
good work some of our stupid girls, after long effort, are able to do, 
and the gain in confidence when one, conscious of her recognized 
inability, finds that her hands are capable of working out to a fine 
nicety something of value. Aside from the mental training, it has 
become a wholesome delight to many. " I dream of it nights," and 
like expressions from the girls bespeak their appreciation. One bright 
girl, committed this year with a most troublesome preceding record, 
showing unusual skill and great love for the work, forgets the old 
things in her zeal to cover, in this, all the institution can offer ; and 
plans to make instruction in sloyd her profession. That there are 
subtle lessons in truth in the work and that the girls are quick to 
recognize them was demonstrated the other day by the apt expression 
of a girl who, in attempting to bring together the parts of a model, 
finding them inexact, remarked, " It lies." 

But school work and singing has not meant a sacrifice of our 
industrial training. The homely processes of every-day family life 
should be kept paramount to all else. 

It is the artificial in the institution that unfits it for its greatest 
possibilities. In the real good accomplished among our girls nothing 
can take the place of genuine home life. The home is the rightful 
heritage of every child, and to the girl all her lifetime robbed of this 
just due, in this revelation of, and consequent growing desire for, the 
home, lies her greatest future protection. Many a girl goes out from 
us to become a factor in the building of a little home nest. More 
than one has this year returned to tell of the coveted home that has 
grown out of the meagre savings of the wage-earning husband. 

The following letter speaks for itself : — 

, Oct. 4, 1903. 

Dear Mrs. Morse : — Possibly you would like to hear from one of your 
old girls, and know how I am getting along. 

It has been a little over two years since I left the school, a little over one 
year since I was married, and I couldn't begin to tell you how happy I have 
been. 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 73 

I am not keeping house, but boarding- with my husband's brother. We 
both work ; I weave in a silk mill, and my husband works in a meat mar- 
ket. I earn as a rule from eight to nine dollars a week, but just at present 
work is slack, and I only work three days a week. But you see where we 
both work, we can lay by some every week, besides having many little 
good times together, such as theatre and carriage riding. 

Some day E shall keep house, but I hope will save money enough to own 
my own home. 

I wish while I am only working three days a week I could come up to 
Lancaster and see the girls. I suppose they are all gone that I knew. 
Three years makes some difference. I often think of the girls, and only 
hope their future will be as bright and happy as mine. 

Please remember me to those whom I know. Trusting to hear from you 
in the near future. 

Lovingly, 



That the atmosphere of the cottage life among us is strangely dis- 
tinct, and that the newcomer is speedily seized by the impression, 
may be best illustrated by citing the case of a girl, strong in individ- 
uality, who had been with us but a few months. Her mother, recently 
widowed, feeling the need of her daughter's companionship and ser- 
vices, made urgent appeal to her for her return. M threw herself 

on the floor by her mother, and, lifting a face serious and womanly 
beyond her years, said : " Mother, I would love to be with and help 
you, and some time I am going to ; but, mother, you don't know 
what this school is like, and what it means to me. The officers are 
so good to us, and they are so anxious to show us how to take care 
of a home, how to cook and to sew, — see, I made this dress I have 
on, — and I feel I can't lose all this chance. If you will let me stay 
and learn all this, I can help you so much more when I do go to you. 

Mother, be willing for me to stay." M bad her way, and now, 

after nearly a year's additional stay, is going to her mother. 

To the tireless patience of the house officers the general wholesome 
atmosphere among the girls is due. An officer cannot become the 
impetus in a game of ball without personally joining in it, nor a 
motive power in the process of moral reformation without a constant 
demand upon self. Large success along these lines comes only 
through continued personal sacrifice. Nowhere is there offered 
grander opportunities for successful study of the individual than in 
an institution, and nowhere greater possible results in such study ; 
but this at the expense of enormous physical and nervous out-put. 
The good disciplinarian is not the one who by her own will holds a 
girl down to a rigid code of rules, but who, facing with her the knotty 
problem of the hour, teaches her to hold self. 

While a vacation from the regular schoolroom work for the summer 



74 SUTT.'S REPORT IXDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

months has not yet been found practicable, the usual variety in out- 
door life has offered respite. The growing interest in out-door sports 
has been most satisfactory. Repeated competitive base-ball games 
have kept alive the spirit. Aside from care of the lawns, gardening, 
harvesting the small crops, the girls have from time to time assisted 
in painting and papering in the cottages. The stained shingles for 
the new hospital were dipped by the girls. In winter, gymnastics 
under a most competent instructor supplements the out-door work of 
summer, and skating and coasting form a most enjoyable substitute 
for ball. 

Notwithstanding an unusual amount of expenditure, the farm ac- 
count shows much smaller returns than that of last year. A second 
planting necessitated, by long drought and excessive rain in turn, 
brought but small yield. Small fruits and garden produce has been 
limited ; the corn crop a failure, with scarcely an average of potatoes. 

In February tuberculosis among the cows disabled one-half the 
herd, limiting by one-half the milk product. Fourteen cows, at an 
aggregate cost of 8500, have been purchased to in part replace the 
loss. 

Last year an appropriation of S500 was allowed for additional hen 
houses. Strict accounts show a supply to the entire institution of 
eggs and chicken ; beyond the wages of a man in charge and grain 
consumed, a net profit of 8200, and nearly 1,000 fowl in stock for 
next year's production. 

To meet the constant wear and tear of an institution each year 
brings its needs. The chapel must be enlarged and repointed, the 
older cottages replumbed and partially replastered ; repairs begun on 
the farmhouse must be completed. Improved methods in schoolroom 
work, referred to, call for better equipments. There should be an 
increased appropriation for text books, music books and maps. 

TThile September 30 shows 207 in the school and an average for 
the year of 203, — an increase in average over last year of only 11, — 
the average for the last half of the present year has been much 
larger, the maximum number reaching 222. During the year 361 
girls have passed through the school. A continuation of these num- 
bers would necessitate additional accommodations. 

A shortage in milk and farm crops, higher prices in food and cloth- 
ing supplies, have caused a slightly increased per capita cost, Table 
XXIV. showing a weekly per capita cost of 84.13. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FANNIE FRENCH MORSE, 

Superintendent. 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 75 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of tlte Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

The past year has been a busy one. Scarlet-fever appeared early 
in the winter, introduced probably by a new girl ; but fortunately 
the cases were diagnosed early, and were promptly isolated. Three 
patients were cared for in the little hospital by a trained nurse, who 
gave herself to her work without stint, and succeeded in carrying all 
safely through. The meagre building, however, was extremely un- 
satisfactory, and both nurse and patients suffered from the intense 
cold. More than ever the necessity of a suitable hospital was 
demonstrated, and the new building now in process of construction 
will meet an urgent need. 

Following the outbreak of scarlet-fever, some thirty girls suffered 
with various forms of sore throat or other suspicious symptoms, and 
strict quarantine was enforced between the different family groups 
for a long period, until all sign of the disease was finally stamped 
out. 

Besides a long list of trifling ailments, several girls were examined 
for eye or ear trouble, and sent for treatment to the Eye and Ear 
Infirmary, with excellent results. One little sufferer succumbed to 
acute tuberculosis. She came to the school in a dying condition, 
and was immediately transferred to a Boston hospital, where she 
soon died. Seven cases of specific disease, one of cystitis, and three 
pregnant girls, were transferred to the hospital at Tewksbury. One 
surgical case was treated at the Clinton Hospital. One case of in- 
cipient phthisis remains at the school, and one, who was ill with the 
same disease at the beginning of the year, has recovered. 

The harmony existing at the school between the superintendent 
and officers, and the kindness of all, contributes greatly to success 
with the girls. With increasing numbers and the added service :it 
Bolton, the physician's duties have heavily increased, and I am in- 
debted to the trustees for their substantial recognition of the same, 
and hereby return cordial thanks. 

Respectfully yours, 



Worcester, Oct. 16, 1903. 



CLARA P. FITZGERALD, 

Physician. 



TATISIICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



"Oct. 



■TATISTIC 



Table I. 



5 ':;:... : J; 



In :he sj-lirc-l Sep: 3J. l?'.2, . 189 

Outside the school, and either on probation, in other ins:::.:::: 15. or 

whereabouts unknown, 325 



7::-: in 
Since commi 



Arrayed -a^rirv 

Died, . 

■ H:r : : : :"." :.:5 :/.: rre : ' ' iz 'cm :v.s:: iv fir _-_ :. i-md'a:-:. 

Total who passed out of custody, .... 

lira! in C7.5:c-dv Sep;. .;■:. l^l?. 

Xe: irireese ^mair :re vear 



74 



514 

6:3 



SO 



Tablz II. 

Shoicing Status Sept. 30, 1903, of AU Girls in Custody of the State 
Industrial School, being All Those committed to the School who 
are under Twenty-one. 

Or _:::":;.:::_ ~:i relaiivf?. H 

On probation with relatives out of New Zngland, ... 6 

Or r: : '::■.::: 'i ir families, t;.::::: — :-i-e; 117 

Ai work els —here, not livin g with relatives, 
A: academy or other school, self-supporting, 1 



Dia 
Die 



lbjeet to recall for cause, 
: t —hereabouts unknown,* 

r: RefimanrT Prism ills jeer. 

r_ R-rfirrr ;.:::•- ?::s:n firmer rears. 



45 



:*:- 



.1: :: ill :ie "ear. 



:: - 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — X 



Table II. — CondmdaL 



7l '—-- i- :'- Sty. : 7 I"-'".:. 
In other institutions : — 

Ir__- : . -::;- _:rre. 
H spital, 

IzflLf 3.57-1Z1. 

S:-::! ::: :7f FrfTzle-ni: 
Reformatory Prison. sfn: 
J. >:::_: 1:77 rris:-. Sri: 
House of Correction. . 



:::r -f .75 



3 
13 

I 
1 

1 

: 



:•:: 



I :::. :_ :-ii:::j -f;: V. 777: 



eabu m. 

rang f&e JMimfer coming into and going from the SekooL 

In the school Sept. 30, 1902, 1? : 

i:e committed, : : 



7. t ; ;71ed — 

7 :: 2h-izz-= - -'.:~. . 

7:;y_: 7f: ..:_r — 7::7 ::~f : :: :e 

For .. vis::. . . 

On account of illness, 

From hospital. . 

running away from hospital, 
running away from place, 

For larceny, 

.nse unsatisfactory. 
:ause she left her husband. 

7 ■; . .-. -: :: . ;_; ;.".;- in;.. ; if .7 

Because in danger of unchaste conduct, 3 

For unchaste conduct, 3 



:_;- ::i - 



13 


25 


- 


1 


: 


:■: 


i* 


:. : 


: 


13 


1 


1 


I 


. : 


: 


: 


:: 


:■: 


1 


1 


1 


1 


17 


:•: 


•:; 


M 



::; 



:-« 






415 



* Two had ran awa r from theii 
homes : 12 were in other famifim 

" Five bad ran hone from tb 

* Rev-aT.e I g B were reca 

I iin the vear ; 1 i 



;10 



within the jeer; 16 twice 



."- :f - ::_:r 



7- STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL S 


CHOOL. 


[Oct. 


Table III. — Concluded. 


Individual l 
Girls. 




Released on probation to parents or relatives, . 


. 26 


30 


Released on probation to other families, for wa^es. 


. 112 


142 


Released on probation to other families, at board, 


1 


1 


Released on probation to other families, earning board 




and going to school, 


5 


6 


Released on probation to work elsewhere, . 


2 


2 


Alarrif:.. 


1 


1 


A::ained majority, 


1 


1 


T:....?:erred to a hospital, 


. U 


26 


Transferred to insane hospital, .... 


1 


1 


Transferred to Reformatorv Prison, . 


1 


1 







211* 




174 





Remaining in the school Sept. 30, 1903, 




. 207 



: Counting each individual under hex most recent release. 

s Released girls : 141 went out once within the year ; 30 twice within the year ; 2 three 
mes within the year : 1 four times within the year. 

Table IV. 

Showing Length of Training in the School be/ore Girls were placed out 

on Probation for the First Time. 



In place 

rgirl, 
l 1 girl, 


5 : — 




Tears. 


3 
11 


2 girls. 

3 girls, 






Years. 
1 

1 


10 

11 


1 ri.i. 






1 


- 


2 girls, 






9 


- 


2 girls. 






1 


1 


1 girl, 









1 


1 £irl. 






1 


o 


1 girl, 






9 


3 


2 girls, 






1 


3 


1 girl, 






9 


4 


1 girl, 
7 girls. 






1 
1 


4 
5 


2 girls, 
1 girl, 






2 
2 


8 
9 


2 girls, 






1 


6 


1 girl, 






3 


1 


2 girls. 






1 


7 


1 girl, 






4 


6 


3 girls. 






1 


8 


1 girl, 






4 


10 


r, girls. 






1 


9 













45 girls, on an average of 1 year, 9 months and 5 days. 



With friend: 



I 2 girl, 


. 





1 girl, 


. 1 


8 


I 5 girl.. 


. 


9 


1 girl, 


. 1 


9 


2 girls, 


1 


1 


1 girl, 


9 


1 


1 girl, 


. 1 


9 


2 girls, . 


. 2 


2 


2 girls, . 


. 1 


5 


1 girl, 


. 2 


5 


2 girls, 


. 1 


1 


1 girl, 


. 3 


9 



16 girls, on an average of 1 year, 6 months and 5 days. 



Placed in familv to 20 to school. 



' To go west with her parents. 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



79 



Table V. 

.Shoiving Length of Training in the School before Girls who had been 
recalled were placed out on Probation again during this Year. 1 



Recalled for unchaste conduct : — 


Recalled because unsatisfactory : — 


Igirl, . 


Mos. 


Days. 

9 2 


1 girl, 




Mos. Days. 
11 


Igirl, . 




. 1 


- 


1 girl, 






14 


Igirl, . 




2 


- 


1 girl, 






21 


2 girls, . 




4 


- 


3 girls, 






1 


Igirl, . 




. 8 


- 


2 girls, 






1 15 


6 girls, on an ave 
14 days. 


rage of 3 


nonths, 


1 girl, 
1 girl, 
Igirl, . 
1 girl, 
1 girl, 






. 2 
3 
4 

6 15 
13 


Recalled because 


in danger 


of un- 


13 girls, on an average 


s of 2 months, 


chaste conduct : 


Mos. 


Days. 


29 days. 






1 girl, . 
1 girl, . 
1 girl, . 
Igirl, . 




- 


1 

7 
11 
14 


Recalled for 

2 girls, 
1 girl, 


larceny : - 


Mos. Days. 

3 

3 15 


2 girls, . 




- 


22 


1 girl, 


• 


5 


1 girl, . 
4 girls, . 
Igirl, . 




1 
2 


24 
15 


4 girls, on ai 
20 days. 


i average 


of 3 months, 


2 girls, . 

1 girl, . 

2 girls, . 




3 

4 

. 4 


15 


Recalled for 
1 girl, 


running away : — 

Mos. Davs. 
. 1 


1 girl, . 




6 


- 


1 girl, 


. 


3 15 


Igirl, . 




10 


- 


Igirl, . 


• 


13 


19 girls, on an av 


erage of 2 i 


nonths, 


3 girls, on a 


a average 


of 6 months, 


15 days. 






1 day. 







« Not including girls returned for change of place, illness, etc. 
a Released to be married. 



80 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table VI. 

Showing Number of Relocations of Girls during the Year. 



114 were relocated once. 


4 were relocated four times. 


44 were relocated twice. 


2 were relocated five times. 


12 were relocated three times. 


176 1 were relocated 264 times. 



i 56 were placed on probation in a family for the first time within this year. 



Table VII. 

Showing Employment of Girls not placed in Families. 



Attending school 


, livin 




at 




Factory, piano, . 


. 1 


home, 


• 






3 


shoe, 


. 4 


Assisting mother or relative, 




12 


typewriter, . 


. 1 


Assisting mother, i 


vvho takes 


in 




watch, . 


. 1 


washing, 


• 






2 


Laundry, . 


. 2 


Assisting mother, 


who 


keeps 




Mill, silk, . 


. 1 


boarders, 


• 






1 


paper, 


. 2 


Bookkeeping, 


•' 






1 


textile, 


. 2 


Keeping house, . 


• 






2 


Millinery, . 


. 1 


Housework by the 


day, 






2 


Office girl for dentist, 


. 1 


Dressmaking, 


• 






3 


Printing shop, . 


. 1 


Factory, box, 










Pyrography, 


. 1 


cigar, . 


• 








Restaurant or hotel, . 


. 3 


cracker, 


• 








Sales girl, . 


. 3 


hose, . 


• 








Training for a nurse, 


. 2 


knitting, 


., 








Not reported, 


. 3 


medicine, 


. 






2 




. 


netting, 








1 




59 ] 



2 others ill at home ; 3 others recently gone home. 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



81 



Table VIII. 

Showing Cash Account of Girls on Probation. 
Cash received to credit of 172 girls, from Sept. 30, 1902, to Sept. 

30, 1903 $2,346 44 

By deposits in savings bank on account of 172 girls, . . . 2,346 44 
Cash drawn from savings bank on account of 86 girls, from 

Sept. 30, 1902, to Sept. 30, 1903, 2,873 71 

By paid amounts from savings bank, 2,873 71 



Table IX. 

Shoioing Use of Savings withdrawn during the Year. 



USE. 



Number of Girls. 



To prepare for wedding, or to start house- 
keeping. 
Board and lodging while starting in a trade, . 


13 
2 


$313 07 
49 97 


Doctors 1 bills, 


10 


100 85 


Dentists 1 bills, 


7 


57 25 


Clothing, 


32 


334 39 


Trunk and bicycle, 


2 


12 49 


To help at home, 


2 


19 00 


To board baby, 


2 


40 71 


Travelling expenses, 


2 


53 00 


To repay money and articles stolen, . 


2 


24 33 


Entire deposit, to girls going to distant home, . 


2 


69 31 


Entire deposit, girls 1 funeral expenses, 


2 


43 78 


Entire deposit to girls of age, .... 


33 


1,755 69 




111" 


$2,873 71 



1 86 individuals : some drawing for more than one purpose. 



82 



STATISTICS INDUSTKIAL SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table X. 

Shotting the Conduct of the 80 Girls ivho passed out of Custody 

within the Year. 
Living respectably, . . 59, or 74 per cent. 

Having behaved badly, . . . . . . . 12, or 15 per cent. 

Conduct unknown, 1 9, or 11 per cent. 

1 Three with friends moved away ; 2 ran away from home ; 4 ran away from a place. 



Table XI. 

Showing where Married Girls met their Husbands, and their Present 

Conduct. 





In their Places. 


In their Homes. 




Of Age 

Sept. 30, 

1903 


Under 

Age 

Sept. 30, 

1903. 


Total 
Number. 


Per- 
centage. 


Of Age 

Sept. 30, 

1903. 


Under 

Age 

Sept. 30, 

1903. 


Total 
Number. 


Per- 
centage. 


Living respectably, 

Conduct bad or 

doubtful. 
Conduct unknown, 


14 
2 
1 


21 > 
1 
4 1 


35 
3 

5 


.81 
.07 

.12 


7 
2 


14 
3 
2 


21 8 
5 3 

2 4 


.75 

.18 

.07 


Totals, . 


17 


26 


43 


- 


9 


19 


28 


- 



Proportion of girls in their places to be married, 
Proportion of girls in their homes to be married, 



17 per cent. 5 
25 per cent. 5 



1 First acquainted : before commitment, 1. 

2 First acquainted : before commitment, 3 ; after return home, 11 ; time not known, 7. 
s First acquainted : before commitment, 1 ; after return home, 1 ; time not known, 3. 

4 First acquainted : after return home, 1 ; time not known, 1. 

5 Based on girls now married and under age, and proportion in places and at home, 
Sept. 30, 1903. 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



83 



Table XII. 

Hospital Treatment was given the Girls for the Following Diseases: 



Abscesses, 


3 


Needle in wrist, 1 


1 


Acute arthritis, 1 


1 


Osteo-periostitis, 


1 


Appendicitis, . 


1 


Otitis media,* . 


8 


Bright's disease, 


1 


Pes planus, 3 


4 


Catarrhal jaundice, . 


1 


Pneumonia, 


2 


Continued fever, 


1 


Pulmonary tuberculosis, 4 


3 


Clubfoot,' 


1 


Pregnancy, 5 


8 


Debility 


1 


Rectal abscess, 




Endometritis, . 


1 


Rhinitis and pharyngitis, 1 




Eyes, defect of vision, 1 . 


41 


Specific diseases, 8 


10 


Fracture of the leg bone, 


1 


Spinal curvature, 1 . 




Gastric ulcer, . 


1 


Spinal meningitis, . 




Gastritis, .... 


1 


Syphilis, congenita], 




Hernia, 1 .... 


1 


Traumatic injury of the wrist, 




Hip disease, 


2 


Ulcer of cornea, 




Incontinence of urine, 


2 


Ulcerative dermatitis, 




Leucorrhcea, 1 . 


1 






Mitral insufficiency, 


1 


Convalescing, . 


9 



Hospitals where treated. 



Attleborough Hospital, 


1 


Massachusetts General Hos- 




( larney Hospital, 


9 2 


pital, 


l:C- 


Clinton Hospital, 


2 


Private hospital, Waterville, 




Fall River ( lity Hospital, . 


1 


Me 


1 


House of the Good Samaritan, . 


1 


St. Elizabeth's Hospital, . 


1 


House of .Mercy, 


1 


St. Luke's Convalescent Home, 


8 


Mary Hiteheoek Memorial Hos- 




State Hospital, . 


23 


pital. Hanover, N. II., . 


1 


Talitha Cumi Home, 


1 


Sfassaohusette Charitable Eye 




Vincent Memorial Hospital, 


3 


and Bar Infirmary, 


52 7 


( lases treated, . 


118 



1 Out-patients. 3 Six were out-patients. 

3 Three were out-patients. ' Two wen out-patients. 

• Condition previous to original oommitmenl to the school, 1. 

•• Condition previous to the original commitment to the school, 6. 

• Forty-eight were out-patients. 



84 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table XIII. 

Showing Home City or Town of 89 Girls committed within the Year, 



Boston, 22 


Adams, 




Cambridge, 








6 


Gardner, 




Chelsea, 








1 


Ipswich, 


. 1 


Chicopee, . 








1 


Methuen, . 




Fall River, . 








5 


Milford, . 




Fitchburg, . 








3 


Nantucket, . 




Holyoke, . 








4 


Natick, 




Lawrence, . 








3 


Southbridge, 




Lowell, 








6 


Sturbridge, 




Lynn, . 








7 


Washington, 


1 


Maiden, 








1 


Westfield, . 




New Bedford, 








2 


Weymouth, 




Newton, 








2 




— 


Pittsfield, . 








1 


From towns 


. 13 


Salem, 








1 


Floating, 1 


. 4 


Somerville, 






» 


1 






Waltham, . 








1 






Worcester, . 








5 




• 


From cities, 






72 







1 For rears in the care of the State or of some children's society, 3. 



Table XIV. 
Showing Technical Causes on 89 Commitments icithin the Yea) 



Stubbornness, 1 . . " . 


. 56 


Common night-walking, . 


2 


Lewdness, .... 


. 2 


Drunkenness, 


2 


Lewd and lascivious, 


. 1 


Larceny, .... 


14 


Leading a lascivious life. . 


. 1 


Vagrancy, .... 


1 


Idle and disorderly, . 


. 7 


Habitual truant, 


1 


Idle and vicious, 


1 


Habitual school absentee, . 


1 



1 The charge of stubbornness simply means that the complaint is brought by the 
parent or guardian, and it may cover almost any offence, from the least serious to the 
most serious. 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



85 



Table XV. 
Showing Ages of the 89 Girls committed within the Year. 



11 years of age, 


. 2 


14 years of age, 


. 14 


12 years of age, 


. 5 


15 years of age, 


. 35 


13 years of age, 


. 8 


16 years of age, 


. 25 



Average age, 15 years, 2 months, 28 days. 



Table XVI. 





(J U \jr 






Born in Massachusetts, 


56 


Born in Canada, 


7 


Born in Maine, . 


1 


Born in the Provinces, 


4 


Born in New Hampshire, . 


2 


Born in England, 


1 


Born in Vermont, 


1 


Born in Ireland, 


1 


Born in Rhode Island, 


1 


Born in Sweden, 


2 


Born in Connecticut, . 


3 


Born in Germany, 


2 


Born in New York, . 


1 


Born in Russia, . 


1 


Born in Pennsylvania, 


1 


Born in Poland, . 


1 


Born in Virginia, 


1 


Born in Italy, 


1 


Born in Michigan, 


1 


Birthplace unknown, 


1 



Table XVII. 

Showing Nativity -of Parents of the 89 Girls committed witliin the 

Year. 



an. 



Both parents American. 

Both parents French Canadian 

Both parents English Canadian 

Both parents from the Province? 

Both parents English, 

Both parent- Irish, . 

Both parents Swede, . 

Both parents German, 

Both parent- Italian, . 

Both parents Russian, 

Both parents Polish, . 

Both parents unknown, 



. 13 


American and Irish, . 


2 


, 16 


American and Scotch, 


2 


, 1 


American aud Danish, 


1 


3, 4 


American and German, 


o 


- 


American and unknown,' 2 . 


o 


. 20 


French Canadian and from the 




. 1 


Provinces, .... 


2 


2 


French and Scotch, . 


3 


1 


English and Irish, 


o 


1 


Irish and Swede, 


1 


1 
. S 


Irish and German, 


1 



- 1 Both parents colored, 3. 



3 Illegitimate child, 1. 



86 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table XVIII. 

Showing Domestic Conditions of the 89 Girls committed within the 

Year. 



Both parents at home, 


31 


Mother or woman in charge of 




Mother only at home, 1 


24 


the home worked out, . 


19 


Father only at home, 2 


11 


No woman in the home, . 


5 


Mother and stepfather at home 


8 






Father and stepmother at home 


6 


Girl previously worked in mill 




Both parents dead, 


3 


factory or store, 


28 


One dead, one whereabouts un- 




Worked at housework or caring 




known, .... 


3 


for children, .... 


14 


Whereabouts of both unknown 


4 


Worked in boarding house, 




Lived with other relatives, 


10 


hotel or restaurant, . v . 


4 


No home, 3 .... 


4 


Was a telephone operator, 


1 






Was on the stage, 


2 


Temperate fathers or step- 








fathers, .... 


27 


Committed as under the average 




Intemperate fathers or step- 




in intelligence, 6 


8 


fathers, .... 


29 


Ran away from home just pre- 




Grossly immoral fathers, . 


2 


vious to commitment, 7 . 


36 


Fathers guilty of incest, . 


1 






Brothers guilty of incest, . 


1 


Transferred from State Board 


• 


Stepfather guilty of rape, . 


1 


of Charity, . . . 


3 


Temperate mothers, . 


36 


Been under the charge of homes 




Intemperate mothers, 


9 


or societies, .... 


14 


Criminal mothers, 


2 


Been on probation from the 




Grossly immoral mothers, 4 


3 


courts, . . . . 


10 


Families on associated charities 




Been in court before, 


3 


records, 5 


10 







1 Divorced from husband, 1; separated from husband, 3; husband deserted, 7; 
husband driven away for drinking, 3. 

2 Wife in penal institution, 1 ; wife gone off with another man, 1. 

3 Not counting those in charge of the societies. 

4 Girl committed is an illegitimate child, mother now married, 1. 

5 Looked up, Boston (20), Cambridge (6), Maiden (1) and "Worcester (5) families 
only. 

8 One had been discharged from the School for the Feeble-minded. 
7 Not including those who stayed out single nights. 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



87 



Table XIX. 

Showing Literacy of 89 Girls committed within the Year. 



In 9th grade, 




2 


Could neither read nor write, 1 . 


10 


In 8th grade, 
In 7th grade, 
In 6th grade, 
In 5th grade, 








4 
12 

9 
12 


Recently left school, . 

Out of school one year, 

Out of school one and one-half 


23 
14 


In 4th grade, 
In 3d grade, 
In 2d grade, 






; • 


15 
16 

7 


years, 

Out of school two years, . 
Out of school two and one-half 


5 
25 


In 4th grade (French 

read or write Engli 

Could read or write 


could not 

sh), . . 

German, 


1 


years, 

Out of school three years, . 
Out of school four years, . 


2 
9 

1 


but not Englis 
little English, 


jh 


; a 


poke very 


1 







1 Two had been at school a short time, but had forgotten how to read and write. 



Table XX. 

Showing the Cause for Return to the School during the Last Four 

Years. 1 





1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 




Num- 


Per- 


Num- 


Per- 


Num- 


Per- 


Num- 


Per- 




bers. 


centage. 


bers. 


centage. 


bers. 


centage. 


bers. 


centage. 


Change of place, visit, 
illness. 


28 


.32 


37 


.37 


56 


.50 


54 


.46 


Unsatisfactoriness, 


27 


.31 


20 


.31 


31 


.28 


23 


.20 


larceny, running 


















away. 


















Danger of unchaste 
conduct. 


11 


.13 


14 


.14 


14 


.13 


17 


.14 


Unchaste conduct, 


22 


.25 


28 
99 


.28 


11 


.10 


2:5 
117 


.20 


Totals, 


88 


- 


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112 


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1 Counting each individual under most serious cause for return during each year. 



88 



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1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



89 






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Recalled to school for serious fault and re- 
maining, 

In prison or house of correction, 

In hospital through their own misconduct, 


Total, couduct bad or doubtful, 

C. — Conduct not known. 
/. No longer in the Care of the Stat, ; — 

Married, 

Unmarried, 


//. £«/. to «k« Care «/ Ms S/a<<j ; — 

Married 

On probation with friends, out of New Eng- 
land,' . 

appeared 

At large, having left their homes or places, 


Total, conduct unknown, 

D. — Rkm aimh.k, teHOSB Conduct fou Obvious 

RBASONB \"i 1 'i M38IFIBD. 
/. Xo longer in the Care of the State : — 

Of age or discharged, unfit, defective or insane, 
Died, never on probation, 


//. Still iii the Care of the Stdti : - 

III, defective or insane, in institutions not penal, 

In State Industrial School through the year, . 

• d< d out in private { unities with schooling, 

Recalled for illness or change of place, not for 

serious fault, and remaining in the school, . 


Total whose conduct is not classified, 

(Iran 1 total 



£ w 



= "2 



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90 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



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1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



91 






Table XXIII. 

Showing, in the Light of their Age at Commitment {being over or 
under Sixteen Years) , the Conduct of the Following Girls : Those 
in the Care of the School throughout the Year ending Sept. 30, 
1903 ; Those coming of Age during the Year ending Sept. 30, 
1903 ; excluding in Both Groups the Non-classifiable 'Class. 1 








Total 
Number. 


Over 16 

Years. 


Under 
16 

Years. 


Per 

Cent, 
over 16 
Years. 


Per 

Cent. 

uuder 16 

Years. 


A. — Living Respectably. 
/. No longer in the Care of the State: — 

Attained majority (married), living 
respectably, 

Attained majority (unmarried), liv- 
ing respectably, .... 

Died, conduct has been good, . 

Honorably discharged, 


23 

30 
2 
4 


3 

10 
1 


20 

20 
1 
4 


- 


- 


77. In Care of but no longer maintained 
by the State: — 
Married, living respectably, 
Unmarried, with friends, . 
At work in other families, 
At work elsewhere, .... 
Attending school or academy, pay- 
ing their way 


59 

35 

62 

121 

8 

8 


14 

5 

9 

21 

2 

1 


45 

30 

53 

100 

6 

7 


.67 


.76 


Total no longer maintained and living 
respectably, 

B.— Conduct Bad or Doubtful. 
7. No longer in the Care of the State: — 
Married, in prison or elsewhere, 
Unmarried, in prison or elsewhere, . 


234 

293 

4 

8 


38 
52 

1 

4 


196 
241 

3 
4 


.73 

.71 


.77 
.77 


II. Still in Care of State, under Twenty- 
one: — 

Married, 

On probation with friends or at large, 
Recalled to school for serious fault 
and remaining, .... 
In prison or house of correction, 
Were in prison, now discharged, 
In hospital through their own mis- 
conduct, 


12 

4 

7 

14 

3 

2 

6 


5 

1 

1 

4 

1 

1 


7 

3 
6 

10 

2 
2 

5 


.24 


.12 


Total, conduct bad or doubtful, 

C — Conduct not known. 
7. No longer in the Care of the State: — 

Married, 

Unmarried, 


36 
48 

9 


8 
13 

2 


28 
35 

7 


.15 

.18 


.11 
.11 


77. Still in the Care of the State: — 

Married, 

On probation with friends, out of 

New England, . . . . 
On probation with friends, whole 

family disappeared, ... 
At large, having left their homes or 

places 


9 
6 
6 

24 


2 
1 
2 

3 


7 
5 
4 

•21 


.10 


.12 


Total, conduct not known, 

Grand total, 


36 
45 

386 


6 
8 

73 


30 
37 

313 


.11 
.11 


.12 
.12 



See foot-note to Table XXII. 



92 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



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1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



93 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Current Expenses and Salaries 
1902. — October, received from State Treasurer, 



1903. 



November, " ' 
December, " * 


January, " • 


February, " * 


March, " ' 


April, " * 


May, 


June, " * 


July, 


August, " ' 


September, " « 







$3,610 47 






2,738 20 






4,110 78 






3,993 29 






3,256 41 






3,076 96 






3,573 22 






3,577 89 






4,266 18 






4,214 86 






3,705 54 






4,338 60 




$44,462 40 



Bills taid 

1902. — October, 

November, 
December, 

1903. — Jan nary, 

February, 
March, . 
April, 
May, 
June, 
July, 
August, . 
September, 



as per Vouchers at State Treasury. 



$3,610 47 


2,738 20 


4,110 78 


3,993 29 


3,256 41 


3,076 96 


3,573 22 


3,577 89 


4,266 18 


4,214 86 


3,705 54 


4,338 60 


$44,462 40 



94 FINANCIAL STATEM'T INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 



Amount drawn from State Treasury. 
Regular Appropriation (Acts of 1903, Chapter 83) for Care of 

1902. — October, 

November, 
December, 

1903. — January, 

February, 
March, . 
April, 
May, 
June, 
July, 
August, . 
September, 



Probationers. 


$237 93 


173 54 


423 95 


138 92 


159 83 


541 11 


493 98 


444 79 


687 06 


414 71 


383 15 


454 05 



$4,553 02 



Expenditures. 

Bills paid as per Vouchers at the State Treasury for Regular Appropriation 

(Acts of 1903, Chapter 83) for Care of Probationers. 
1902.— October, 

November, 

December, 
1903. — January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

$4,553 02 



$237 93 


173 54 


423 95 


138 92 


159 83 


541 11 


493 98 


444 79 


687 06 


414 71 


383 15 


454 05 



Appropriation per Probationers to meet a Deficiency caused in December 

1902. 
1903. — April, $75 49 






1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



95 



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and labor, . 
groceries, . 
aterials, 

provements, 

odicale, 

8 and entertain- 

s aud traneporta- 

lOHpital sup|)lies, 

luting Hupplies, . 

etc., . 

office Huppiies, . 
d school supplies, 
telegraph, . 

supplies, . 
ons and harness 

18, seeds, etc., 

id live stock, 
chines, etc., 














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96 



FARM ACCOUNT INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. [Oct. 



FARM ACCOUNT. 



Dr. 

To live stock, as per inventory, 1902, . . . . $3,610 50 

tools and carriages, as per inventory, 1902, .... 2,475 00 

miscellaneous, as per inventory, 1902, 1,763 90 

produce on hand, as per inventory, 1902, .... 5,298 65 

blacksmithing, 160 10 

fertilizers, 139 00 

farming implements, 252 21 

grain, . . . . 3,263 80 

labor, 3,021 84 

live stock, 1,481 60 

services of veterinary, 95 50 

plants, seeds, and trees, . 279 81 

harness repairs, " . . 55 15 

Paris green, etc., 15 15 

Total, $21,912 21 



Cr. 

By produce consumed, 

produce sold and amount sent to State Treasurer, 

produce on hand, as per inventory, 1903, 

live stock, as per inventory, 1903, 

tools and carriages, as per inventory, 1903, . 

miscellaneous, as per inventory, 1903, . 



Total, .... 
Balance against the farm, 



|5,907 85 
863 65 
4,231 18 
4,524 75 
3,000 00 
1,311 08 

$19,838 51 
$2,073 70 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



97 



VALUATION OF PKOPEKTY, 

State Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster, Oct. 1, 1903. 



Real Estate 
Chapel, . 
Hospital, . 
Putnam Cottage, 
Fisher Hall, . 
Richardson Hall, 
Rogers Hall, . 
Fay Cottage, . 
Mary Lamb Cottage, 
Elm Cottage, . 
Superintendent's house 
Storeroom, 
Farmhouse and barn, 
Large barn, 
Silo, 

Holden shop, . 
Ice house, 
Wood house, . 
Two hen houses, 
Piggery, . 

Reservoir house No. 1, 
Reservoir house, land, etc., No. 2, 
Carriage shed, 
Water works, land, etc., 
Hose house, hose, etc., 
Store barn, 
Farm, 176 acres, 
Broderick lot, 12 acres, 
Wood lot, 10 acres, . 
Storm windows, 
Corn crib, 
Root cellar, 
Bolton annex, . 
Farm house, 
Barn, 

Tillage, 33 acres, 
Woodland, 7 acres, . 
Wood and sprout lot, 30 
Spring, . 

Total valuation of real estate, 



$6,500 00 




1,500 00 




16,000 00 




16,000 00 




15,000 00 




11,750 00 




12,000 00 




12,500 00 




4,900 00 




4,000 00 




300 00 




2,000 00 




7,275 00 




400 00 




200 00 




1,000 00 




600 00 




1,000 00 




1,100 00 




100 00 




300 00 




150 00 




7,500 00 




2,000 00 




125 00 




11,300 00 




1,000 00 




200 00 




40 00 




50 00 




175 00 




21,000 00 




400 00 




100 00 




1,650 00 




350 00 




450 00 




200 00 




£161,115 


00 



98 



PROPERTY INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Personal Property 
Produce of farm on hand, 
House furnishings and supplies, . 
Valuation of live stock, 
Tools and carriages, 
Miscellaneous, .... 



$4,231 18 

24,250 66 

4,524 75 

3,000 00 

1,311 08 



|37,317 67 



ANDREW J. BANCROFT, 
WM. L. BANCROFT, 

Appraisers. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Worcester, ss. Lancaster, Oct. 12, 1903. 

Personally appeared the above-named appraisers, and made oath that the statements 

subscribed by them are true. 

GEORGE E. HOWE, 

Justice of the Peace. 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



99 



LIST OF SALAKIED OFFICERS NOW 
EMPLOYED. 



F. F. Morse, superintendent, 
A. Hawley, assistant superintendent, 

G. K. Wight, steward, 
C. P. Fitzgerald, M.D., physician, 
L. Chapin, supply officer, — present acting clerk 
M. L. Eaton, teacher of music, 
I. Prouty, teacher of sloyd, . 
M. B. Atherton, teacher of gymnastics, 
A. L. Jordon, matron in charge of Bolton 
A. M. T. Eno, matron, 
H. A. Woodward, matron, 
E. A. Bartlett, matron, 
J. M. Mclntire, matron, 
C. C. Russell, matron, 
M. P. Buell, matron, . 

E. A. Greenlaw, matron, 
D M. Wicker, teacher, 
H. B. Shaw, teacher, . 

F. Ovens, teacher, 

E. C. Mann, teacher, . 
L. A. Strout, teacher, . 
H. Albee, teacher, 
A. Sturges, teacher, . 
L. M Greenlaw, teacher, 
K. E. Wight, housekeeper, 
I. E. Brown, housekeeper, 

F. A. Kilbourne, housekeeper, 
A. Crocker, housekeeper, 
A. A. Stowell, housekeeper 
M. L. Smith, housekeeper, 
A. Smart, housekeeper, 
L. Eastman, housekeeper, 
J Griffin, housekeeper, 
I. N. Bailey, housekeeper, 
V. P. Wight man, vacancy officer 
W. B. Wright, vacancy officer, 



$1,500 00 


600 00 


650 00 


600 00 


400 00 


400 00 


500 00 


200 00 * 


550 00 


400 00 


400 00 


400 00 


400 00 


375 00 


350 00 


350 00 


325 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


, 300 00 


350 00 


350 00 


350 00 


350 00 


350 00 


325 00 


800 00 


300 00 


8< 00 


260 nor 


400 00 


400 00 



1 Per six months. 



3 Five dollars a week 



100 OFFICERS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. [Oct. 1903. 

E. E. Eames, gardener, $325 00 

D. H. Bailey, carpenter, 540 00 

A. E. Brown, driver, . . . 360 00 

W P. Woodbury, foreman of the farm, . . . . , 590 00 

N. O. Mclntire, farmer, 312 00 

H. B. Eastman, farmer, 312 00 

E. W. Harrington, farmer, 312 00 

A. J. Smart, teamster, 312 00 

W. Eastman, teamster, 312 00 

B. V. Smith, foreman of Bolton farm, 420 00 

C. W. Wright, farmer, . 312 00 

Total $18,642 00 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... .... No. 18. 



TENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 



Lyman and Industrial 
Schools 



(Formerly known as Trustees of the State Primary and 
Reform Schools), 



Year ending September 30, 1904. 







BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1905. 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



.A 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Trustees' Report on Lyman School, 5 

Trustees' Report on State Industrial School, 14 

Resolution upon the Resignation of Miss Elizabeth C. Putnam, . . 20 

Report of Treasurer of Trust Funds, 24 

Appendix A, Report of Officers of the Lyman School : — 

Report of Superintendent, 33 

Report of Berlin Farmhouse, 36 

Report of Superintendent of Lyman School Probationers, .... 39 

Report of Physician, . 48 

Statistics concerning Boys, 49 

Financial Statement, 59 

Farm Account, 64 

Valuation of Property, . . . — 65 

List of Salaried Officers, 67 

Appendix B, Report of Officers of State Industrial School: — 

Report of Superintendent, 72 

Report of Physician, 74 

Report of Superintendent of Industrial School Probationers, ... 75 

Statistics concerning Girls, 79 

Financial Statement, 97 

Farm Account, 100 

Valuation of Property, 101 

List of Salaried Officers, 103 

List of Volunteer Visitors, 105 



Commottimalljj of llfassatfrns-ette. 



LYMAN AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS. 



TRUSTEES. 
M. H. WALKER, Westborough, Chairman. 
ELIZABETH G. EVANS, Boston, Secretary. 
€HARLES G. WASHBURN, Worcester, Treasurer. 
EDMUND C. SANFORD, Worcester. 
GEORGE H. CARLETON, Haverhill. 
M. J. SULLIVAN, Chicopee. 
SUSAN C. LYMAN, Waltham. 

HEADS OP DEPARTMENTS. 
THEODORE F. CHAPIN, Superintendent of Lyman School. 
THOMAS H. AYERS, Visiting Physician of Lyman School. 
WALTER A. WHEELER, Superintendent of Lyman School Probationers. 
FANNIE F. MORSE, Superintendent of Slate Industrial School. 
CLARA P. FITZGERALD, Visiting Physician of State Industrial School. 
MARY W. DEWSON, Superintendent of Industrial School Probationers. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT 



LYMAN AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools respect- 
fully present the following report for the year ending Sept. 30, 
1904, for the two reform schools under their control. 

LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS AT WESTBOROUGH. 
Every year, as our population becomes more and more 
crowded in cities, an increasing number of well-to-do persons 
find home conditions so ill adapted to the training of their 
boys that, as they arrive at their teens or soon afterward, they 
are sent away to boarding school. The poor have not this 
resource. Of necessity their boys grow up in the streets. 
Smoking cigarettes, frequenting cheap theatres, bunking out 
nights, raiding fruit stands, and in general defying their par- 
ents and the police are pursuits too often regarded by them as 
appropriate to their age and condition. The parents, ill-dis- 
ciplined themselves and with no idea of control except the rod, 
when that fails to correct must either ask to have their boys 
"put away/' as the phrase goes, or they must let them run 
(ill they are picked up by the police. In either case the char- 
acter of the boy's offence is much the same, and in either case 
the Lyman School is apt to be his destination. Out of 17l» 
boys who were committed to the school by the courts Last year, 
t") were on complaint of parents as stubborn children and V64 
were brought in by officers for offences against the law, — in 
nine cases out of ten this taking the form of an attack upon 
other people's property. 



(3 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

Among these rebels against law and order are a very consid- 
erable number who in character are in no way worse than many 
a boy in a private boarding school ; but there are also among 
them a very large number who are weaker in will, duller in mind 
and more depraved in instinct than the average, and who would 
drag down the level of any institution. It is this, as well as 
the fact that boys enter the Lyman School by a sentence, and 
are held there by the arm of the law, that makes much in the 
way of method inapplicable here which is the very key to the 
success of a good boarding school. Realizing this, the trustees 
at the same time realize that their problem is, after all, an edu- 
cational one, and can only be solved by methods approved in 
other educational institutions. 

Encouragement by rewards instead of repression by punish- 
ment, appeal to boyish impulses and ambitions instead of mere 
routine and drill, leadership by comrades, and community 
spirit, — these, if success is looked for, must in some form be 
brought into play. And the effort of the Lyman School, never 
more consciously felt than at present, is to emphasize these 
features more and more. A marking system with privileges 
attached, an honor class with excursions off the grounds, wages 
in token money with redemption in real money of the margin 
saved above living expenses, and some features of self-govern- 
ment in the schoolroom and the singing classes, — all these are 
efforts to reinforce the word of command by the boys' own co- 
operation . 

In its external arrangements the Lyman School is probably 
not unlike many of the more progressive reform schools 
throughout the country. It is arranged in cottage groups, and 
its instruction includes music, drawing, carving, manual train- 
ing, physical drill, etc. Three hours in the schoolroom and 
five at some form of manual training or work about the build- 
ings and the grounds is the plan of the day. By the training 
of the school, a boy of fair intelligence can hardly fail to find 
his faculties brought into play, his interest awakened in many 
directions, and the ability to earn an honest living ensured to 
him ; and these results have been achieved even in cases where 
stubborn boys have had to be severely disciplined before they 
would fall into line. 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 7 

In a school which receives boys by sentence, but which re- 
fuses to hold them by bolts and bars, there will always be 
trouble from runaways. Twenty-four boys made good their 
escape within the year, besides a number of others who got off 
the grounds but were soon recaptured. As against this fact, 
however, it should be remembered that every boy on the 
grounds has a chance to escape almost every day of the year ; 
and that for those who can be held, life in an open school as 
compared with a walled-in institution is of incalculable value 
in the formation of habits of manly self-control. By making 
the cottage group responsible in the matter of runaways, com- 
munity spirit can be successfully brought into play. To this 
end a money prize is now offered to any household in which 
there have been no runaways for a given term, the money to 
be spent as the boys may determine in ways they can all share. 
Three months without a runaway in the cottage wins $3 ; six 
months an additional $5 ; nine months an additional $6, and so 
on. One cottage has already the proud record of fifteen con- 
secutive months without a single runaway; another cottage 
has gone nine months ; and only one cottage has failed to win 
at least one prize within the year. 

The policy of freedom, be it said, throws endless responsi- 
bility and labor upon the superintendent and his staff of helpers, 
and the unselfishness and loyalty with which the}' surrender 
themselves to their work, as well as the progressive spirit 
which animates them, are worthy of the highest commendation. 

A unique and wholly excellent feature of the Lyman School 
is the branch at Berlin, some seven miles from the main insti- 
tution, where all the newcomers under thirteen years of age 
arc sent as soon as may be after their arrival. In a simple 
farmhouse, which hicks in equipment every characteristic fea- 
ture of an institution, it is found practicable to manage a hand- 
ful of children by methods which, in a big institution and with 
older boys, would entail chaos. Schooling in the elementary 
branches, a great deal of fun and frolic, and a gentle word of 
command from a woman who is a born mother, suffice as dis- 
cipline, and a happier and more untrammelled set of youngsters 
than those in the Berlin farmhouse 1 it would be hard to find in 
Massachusetts. As a rule, in a few months a boy can be suf- 



TRUSTEES' REPOKT LYMAX SCHOOL. [Oct. 

tieiently tamed to allow him to be boarded out in a farmer's 
family, where he learns to live in the world like other children, 
attending the district school, and taking a natural part in the 
coram unity. The most of these boarded boys go back to their 
own people after an absence of a year or two. or. if their own 
homes are bad, they are found places with farmers when they 
can earn their way. Those who fail to do well on trial are re- 
called to Westborough for a longer and more systematic train- 
ing : but about half of the whole number grow up to manhood 
without realizing that they have ever been in a reform school. 

At Westborough the length of the training is regulated by a 
marking system, under which, by exemplary conduct, a boy 
can earn his freedom in a year, while the average stay is only 
eighteen months. But when a boy goes out. whether from 
Westborough or from Berlin, it is only to partial freedom, for 
in every case the school maintains control until he attains 
majority, recalling him for bad conduct to the school, or. in 
extreme cases, transferring him to the Massachusetts Reforma- 
tory at Concord. Of the 128 2 boys who this year passed out 
of the care of the school by the attainment of their majority, 
99 had been only once in the school. 23 had been in the school 
more than once, and 6 had been recalled for transfer to 
Concord. 

"When the boys earn their right to leave the school, about 49 
per cent, go direct to them own people, 19 per cent, of the little 
Berlin boys go out to board for a while, and 32 per cent, who 
have no homes to go to are placed out to earn their living with 
farmers . TThereas the little boarders, although usually city born 
and bred, take to life upon the farm as to their native element, 
delighting in the cow* and horses and identifying themselves 
with all the simple country avocations, to an older boy the 
country too often is exile; and so urgent in some cases is the 
longing for city life, so compelling is the boy"s desire, that often 
the trustees must strain a point, and let one or another take his 
chances in a home which no one can approve. But frequently 
when the home conditions are improper, a boy's co-operation 
can be gained, and he is willing to go out upon a farm. Here he 

1 T~ p ■ irho had run away from the school and never been recaptured are not 
counted here. 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



starts under a contract of money to be paid him after a certain 
term of service, and this money the visitor collects for him 
and places in a bank to his credit; $2,396.87 in behalf of 64 
boys was collected last year. When a boy is eighteen, though 
he is still followed with the influence and advice of the Lyman 
School visitors, it is not sought to further control his where- 
abouts. He is free to make his own bargains, to collect his 
own wages, and, if he will, to go back to live in the city. 

Now the question may well be asked, what, as a matter of 
fact, is the future of these farm boys? Do they all drift back 
to the cities? And when they go back are they found at a 
disadvantage with their fellows? These questions the trustees 
are prepared to answer with some detail. A comparison among 
the boys who came of age within the year, of those who had 
been on farms and those who had been in the cities, shows, so 
far as conduct is concerned, in favor of the country boys. The 
figures are : — 



Standing. 



Of 45 Boys 
placed on Farms. 



Of 82 Boys 

released to their Parents 

or Relatives. 



Doing well without question, 
Not so well, but self-supporting, 
Unknown, .... 
Badly, 



27, or 60 per cent. 
7, or 15 
4, or 10 
7, or 15 



41, or 50 per cent. 
21, or 25 
8, or 10 
12, or 15 



Inquiring as to the present occupations of the boys who went 
to the country, one finds : — 

13 are now doing well on farms, earning good wages. 

14 are doing well in their city homes. 
7 are, in the army and navy. 



Considering the occupations of the 11 boys who, having boon 
placed on farms, are now in the city, one finds thai in indus- 
trial grade they are upon a full equality with the boys who 
went from the school direct to the city. Among the farm- 
reared boys is a steam fitter, a lithographer, an agent, two on 
electric light works. 3 mill hands, etc. Only one is a laborer. 
Again, of the 13 boys who are now doing well on farms. 7 of 



10 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

them have been for a time to the city and chosen to return to 
the country, while 6 have remained in the country continuously. 

Considering that in every one of those placed-out boys his 
home conditions were decidedly unfavorable, the results of 
placing out when reduced to demonstrated facts and figures is 
decidedly satisfactory. 

As further illustrating the possibilities which the placing 
system offers to boys who have little chance in their own 
homes, the following histories are sketched : — 

R. M., full of fun and mischief, and inclined to follow any 
leader, grew up in a wretched home, both parents hard drinkers. 
At the age of eleven he was sent to the Lyman School on the 
charge of larceny, and after three months at Berlin he was 
boarded out. A year and a half later he was placed on trial 
with a great-aunt, but she soon found herself unable to control 
him, and at her request he was returned to the Lyman School. 
Passing only one night there he was placed out .to earn his 
living with a farmer, and for this farmer and for others in the 
neighborhood he has worked until he is now almost twenty-one 
years old. He has never wanted to go back to the city, and 
he plans with the $150 which he will have in the bank when he 
is twenty-one to buy a little place for himself in the neighbor- 
hood where he has lived so long. 

Another boy, R. R., colored, seemingly dull and unpromis- 
ing, and suspected of criminal tendencies, was also a Berlin 
boy, who, after a few months, was boarded out. After doing 
well at board for two and one-half years he was allowed to go to 
an aunt in the city, — a respectable woman with whom it was 
hoped he might have a good home ; but he could not find work, 
and some six months later, finding him idle, ragged and in a 
home showing signs of extreme poverty, the visitor, disregard- 
ing the aunt's vehement opposition, placed him upon a farm. 
From that day he has earned good wages. He is careful of 
his money and has a bank account of his own, besides fifty 
dollars which is on deposit to his credit at the school. Some 
months since, his employer sold his farm upon a mortgage, with 
an agreement for payment by instalments, and R. passed with 
the farm to a new employer. When the first payment fell due, 
however, the mortgagor absconded, taking with him what 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



11 



money he had collected from the sale of produce. Left with- 
out an employer, the hands quit work, all but R., who was left 
alone upon the premises, with sixty head of cattle to be milked 
and tended. The first night he made out unassisted. The next 
day he got some help from the neighbors, and so he managed 
until the owner returned to take possession of the farm, and to 
find everything in good condition, due to the faithful service of 
this colored boy, whom no one seems to have had any use for 
in the city. 

Other histories of boys are given in the report of the super- 
intendent of probationers, on page 39, together with many 
facts and figures which will be of interest to those who desire 
detailed information as to the methods of the department, and 
as to Lyman School boys when the}' have again become mem- 
bers of the community. 

A comparative table showing the conduct of probationers 
who passed out of the care of the school within the year, upon 
the attainment of their majority, shows : — 







1893. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


1899. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 




Per 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Per 




Cent. 


Cent. 


Cent. 


Cent. 


Cent. 


Cent. 


Cent. 


Cent. 


Cent. 


Cent. 


Doing well, . 


.42 


.46 


.53 


.58 


.61 


.69 


.60 


.60 


.58 


.70 


Not doing well, . 


- 


.03i 


.02 


.03 


.02 


.02 


.02 


.01 


.02 


.02 


Have been in other 


.35 


.35 


.30 


.31 


.22 


.22 


.24 


.22 


.29 


.16 


penal institutions. 






















Out of the (State, . 


- 


.oh 


.04 


.02 


.08 


.01 


.07 


.02 


.01 


.02 


Lost track of, 


.23 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Doing well at 


_ 


.09) 

.14 
.05) 


.07) 


.02|) 


.04|) 


.06 


_ 


_ 


.08) 


.05) 


last account. 




S.n 


S.06 


.07 








.10 


.10 


Not doing well 


- 


.04S 


• 03i) 


•021) 


- 


- 


- 


.02) 


.05) 


at last ac- 






















count. 























The year of 1893 is chosen as a basis of comparison because 
that was the first year such figures were ever gathered, and its 
extremely mortifying showing was the cause of the system of 
caring for the probationers inaugurated in 1895. 

Thirteen boys were transferred within the year to the Massa- 
chusetts Reformatory, and 15 were so transferred the year pre- 
vious, against only 2 and 3 transferred in 1892 and 1891 respec- 
tively. This means, not that the boys have behaved worse, 



12 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

but that the trustees have become less lenient in keeping at the 
school boys who have been returned there. It is facts such as 
these that make deductions drawn from statistics of little value 
until subjected to careful analysis. The boys who came of age 
within the year are characterized as upon the whole of less 
promising material than the average. Yet the per cent, classed 
as doing well is the highest ever attained. It will be interest- 
ing to see if this figure can be held in the future. 



The continued overcrowding to which attention was called 
in the last report again raises the question of the need of 
another cottage. Within the year numbers at the school have 
run as high as 343 in accommodations planned for only 314. 
Among the inmates there are a very considerable number of 
returned boys of sixteen or seventeen years old who, while 
their careers have not warranted a transfer to Concord, are yet 
extremely undesirable as pupils of the school. If provision for 
these could be made in an outlying department similar in 
principle to the Berlin branch, it would relieve the overcrowd- 
ing and at the same time would greatly improve the possibil- 
ities of the school for the younger boys who would remain. 
Further, it might be arranged that boys between the ages of 
fifteen and seventeen or eighteen might be received from the 
courts, and in this way a need might be met which has been 
long urged by the judges of the Commonwealth. Were such 
a branch school started on a small scale and built up gradually, 
so far as possible, by boys' labor, the immediate outlay would 
be moderate, and the ultimate results perhaps as satisfactory 
as if a new institution intermediate between the Lyman School 
and Concord, so often recommended, were created. The trus- 
tees are maturing a plan upon these lines which they will 
present to the consideration of the Legislature. 

The hospital, for which an appropriation of $10,000 was 
granted some eighteen months ago, has been slow in building 
because it has been largely constructed by boy labor. It will 
now soon be ready for occupation and will be a valuable adjunct 
to the equipment of the school. An appropriation last year of 
SI, 200 has put the ovens of the bakery in good condition. A 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 13 

small appropriation will be asked to lay a conduit for the steam 
and water pipes which connect several of the buildings. 

The Lyman School opened the year Avith 320 inmates and 
closed with 343. The whole number in the school during the 
year was 554, while the average number was 319.49. The 
total number of boys whose names were upon the books on 
September 30 as under twenty-one years of age was 1,326 ; of 
these, 343 were in the school, 842 were in the care of the 
visiting department, 44 l were runaways from the school, and 
97 others were discharged, returned to court, transferred to 
other institutions or dead. 

The appropriations for running the school the past year were : 
for salaries, $32,466, for current expenses, $49,500, — a total 
of $81,966 for running the institution. To be expended on 
behalf of probationers: for visitation, $9,000; for boarding, 
$5,000; for tuition fees to towns, $600. The expenditure in 
behalf of the institution from Oct. 1, 1902, to Sept. 30, 1903, 
was $81,782.09. The expenditure in behalf of probationers 
was $12,868.46. The per capita cost of the institution was 
$4.90, and $574.40 was turned into the State treasury, making 
a net per capita cost of $4. 87 . The per capita cost for the family 
at Berlin was $2.95, 2 the per capita cost of visitation was .18 
cents per week, and the per capita for the whole body of boys 
in the care of the school, whether as inmates or probationers, 
was approximately $1 .41 per week. 

1 Eight of these are known to he in other institutions, and one to have enlisted in 
the navy. 

• - This figure takes account only of the outlay for the Berlin family, and does not 
charge to it any share of the central administration. 



14 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 



STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS AT 
LANCASTER. 

The State Industrial School for Girls, like the Lyman School 
for Boys, receives its inmates from the courts for the term of 
minority, and, like the Lyman School, it trains them in the 
institution for a year or two and retains its control until its 
wards attain majority. But girls are different from boys, and 
the methods and the problems of the two schools are endlessly 
different. Perhaps in a general way it may be said that the 
girls' school, as a school, is more easily handled, the inmates 
chafing less at control and being more easily interested in the 
simple incentives and pleasures which the institution can offer ; 
while the probation period with them is one of vastly greater 
difficulty than with boys. It may be said, too, that among the 
girls a smaller proportion come from respectable homes, and 
that when they do so it argues strongly that there is something 
wrong in their own make-up. Further, the class of offences 
for which boys and girls come is widely different, — the one, 
as a rule, being guilty of attacks upon property, or general 
lawlessness, while offences against themselves or a tendency 
that way is the thing that lands a girl in the Lancaster school. 

The opportunity which the cottage system affords for classi- 
fication is vital to the Industrial School system. The handi- 
cap of ungraded schoolrooms, which the strict segregation of 
the family group involves, is believed to be more than offset by 
the advantage of protecting the more innocent inmates of one 
cottage from the more depraved inmates of another. The 
superintendent, who is not one to accept contentedly a second 
best, has, moreover, found it possible to introduce into the 
ungraded schoolrooms much of the advanced methods of in- 
struction, special teachers going from house to house to give 
lessons in music, drawing, nature study, etc., and calling out 
the cottage groups in turn for classes in sloyd or gymnastics. 
Sloyd, be it said, has proved of incalculable value, many of 
the girls delighting in it, and doing everything better in conse- 
quence. A central department, in which groups of girls can 
have lessons in a higher grade of cooking and laundry work 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 15 

than the busy cottage housekeepers can find time for, will be 
soon opened, and will introduce a feature Avhich heretofore has 
been deemed incompatible with cottage instruction pure and 
simple. 

Vacation from school work in the summer has long been 
thought impracticable, bat this year it was attempted with ex- 
cellent results, out-door occupations, such as lawn mowing, 
weeding in the vegetable garden, etc., proving a wholesome 
substitute. 

The branch at Bolton, one and a half miles distant, by with- 
drawing the girls of the more depraved type, has in many ways 
improved the opportunities of the more hopeful girls, who con- 
stitute the majority at Lancaster. 

The classification of girls of the feeble-minded type, so far 
as possible, in one of the cottages has been advantageous in so 
many ways that it is surprising it was not adopted long ago. 
Formerly their presence was a constant drag upon the possi- 
bilities of each household, while the tendency to hold the men- 
tally deficient to a standard they could never attain was inevitable 
when they were classed with normal girls, the ineradicable dif- 
ference between the two being but vaguely recognized. More- 
over, when there is an explicit effort to sort out the feeble 
minded, many border line cases are recognized and studied 
from a new point of view. Many of these girls have been for 
a number of years in the care of the school, and they consti- 
tute a problem which will be considered later. 

It is when a girl is ready to leave the institution that the 
time of difficulty begins. Her training has fitted her to be 
come a household helper, this being the occupation in which 
there is the surest demand for her labor, and the only one in 
which she can maintain herself in reasonably safe conditions 
should it not be thought safe to place her with her own people. 
Of every girl it is true that cither her parents have shown 
themselves unable to control her or that they have failed to 
control themselves. In many cases the girls have been more 
sinned against than sinning; but be; that as it may, the com- 
panions who proved her undoing will be on hand should she 
go home, and the question must Ik 1 raised in each case whether 
the change that a Near or two in the school can effect will make 



16 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

her proof against the old temptations. Of the 271 x girls who 
are on probation to the school, 70 are with their own people ; 
47 are married, some married excellently well ; 138 are at work 
in families for wages ; 5 are dressmaking, or doing other suit- 
able work by the day and living in suitable places ; 10 are 
going to school and earning their way meanwhile at house- 
work ; and 1, under fourteen, is at board. 

Many interesting statistics are given in the report of the 
superintendent of probationers, on page 75, and the appended 
tables. 

The following cases are mentioned as illustrating the steady- 
ing influence of school control and subsequent care during the 
period of probation : — 

A. B. had been brought up from infancy by a relative who had ex- 
posed her to most degrading influences, and who continued to attempt 
to put her again under the influence of the same bad man. The girl 
was docile, and, while behaving fairly well in the school and in her 
places, seemed incapable of withstanding this malign influence ; but 
when at last her conduct on probation warranted her visitor in hold- 
ing before her the hope of obtaining the much coveted work by the 
day, and when the discovery of some excellent relatives made such an 
arrangement possible, a fine business position, with promise of pro- 
motion, was secured, and the girl behaved so well that after a few 
months the trustees gave her an honorable discharge from the custody 
of the school. 

C. D. had caused the trustees great anxiety. During a time of 
trial in her own home their worst fears were realized, and she was re- 
called to the school. Later she was again placed out, and in the two 
following years she earned a right to be trusted. Soon after going- 
home again she was well married, and is doing well. 

F. G. came from a wretchedly poor and degraded family. Her 
father was constantly serving time for drunkenness, and the mother 
bore a worse reputation. The house was a resort of low character. 
The home of her aunt, next door, was more wretched but without the 
taint of depravity. The two oldest daughters are now in our care, 
one is simple minded, the other as ignorant and undeveloped as her 
parents. F. G. was bright and well intentionecl. Obviously she 
never could go home. She was placed at a time of need in a family 
of moderate income. She became intimate with the capable, high- 

1 Girls whose whereabouts are unknown or who are in other institutions are not 
counted in this figure. 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 17 

toned daughters. When no longer needed as house worker, she was 
allowed to board in the home, and get day work, at which she has 
now distanced the girls who were there long before her. 

M. N.'s mother died just before she entered high school. She grew 
disobedient to her father, an excellent man. He sent her to us as a 
preventive measure. M.'s training in the school and at housework 
has left her a thoroughly trustworthy, well-balanced, capable young 
woman. In her last place she earned $3 a week and was a member 
of the family. This fall she decided to begin high school again. She 
works for her board and a small sum of money, relying chiefly on her 
savings. She is a member of the family and of the community; no 
one but her employer knows she is in our care, and the visitor sees 
her only in Boston. The first report of her school work is very good. 

E. H., motherless, with an intemperate father and brother, was 
placed out in one of the most helpful of the good families, such as are 
sometimes open to our girls. There she became respected and self- 
respecting, and the friendly treatment of the daughters about the 
girl's own age led her to refuse to be dragged down by her intemper- 
ate father and brother. She recently came up, with her employer's 
family, to the Peace Conference, and her visitor says of her, "she 
seems just like anybody else." 

The care of these girls during their minority is a task beset 
by incalculable difficulties, and demanding endless labor and 
devotion from those who undertake it. The closeness of the 
oversight which is required, and the kind of relation with them 
which must be established, if success is to be attained, are en- 
tirely different from that involved in the care of boys or of 
young children, and the claims upon the visiting force are cor- 
respondingly great. This work was formerly discharged by 
the visiting department of the State Board of Charity, but an 
appropriation granted last year has enabled the trustees to as- 
sume an undivided responsibility for their wards, and Miss 
Mary W. Dew son is organizing a staff of visitors, paid and 
unpaid, who are entering upon their duties with enthusiasm. 
Daring the transition period the State Board and its officers 
have been most generous in assistance, continuing to act as 
visitors for girls until the new department was ready to under- 
take them, and in every way co-operating helpfully. To the 
many ties which have grown out of common work with the 
Board's officers, a new occasion of grateful memory has thus 
been added. 



18 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

In this connection it is fitting to note that Miss Elizabeth 
C. Putnam, who for twenty-four years has served as trustee, 
giving herself to the work with unexampled devotion, having 
resigned her office, is now enlisted as a volunteer visitor, and 
as such she is entering upon a new career of usefulness. Ap- 
pended to this report is a resolution, adopted by the trustees 
upon her resignation, which indicates the notable character of 
her service to the Commonwealth. 

The growing numbers in the school bring up in a new and 
more urgent form the need so often mentioned of provision for 
those who are mentally deficient, and who, as above mentioned, 
form a considerable factor in the Industrial School. Most of 
them while in the institution are capable of considerable im- 
provement, and some, who have respectable people, may ulti- 
mately go home with safety ; but no training can fit one who 
is defective in intellect and sensual in instinct to protect her- 
self when at large. Her fate when sent out into the world is 
as certain as the multiplication table, while the damage which 
she may inflict upon society is a sum that cannot be computed. 

From time to time in the past the trustees have secured 
commitment of girls of this class to the School for the Feeble- 
minded, this institution having authority to hold them indefi- 
nitely ; but latterly, because of a lack of proper accommodations, 
the Feeble-minded School has refused to receive girls who are 
criminally disposed, and the Industrial School has been forced 
to hold certain feeble-minded subjects simply because it is so 
injurious to the community to turn them loose. The anomaly 
of caring for such girls in an institution which aims to equip 
its wards for a useful life is evident. What they need is cus- 
todial care for life, or at least through the child-bearing period ; 
and the State will find it economy on the bare ground of dol- 
lars and cents to make a proper provision for them. 

In preference, therefore, to asking for a new cottage to meet 
the overcrowding at Lancaster, as must clearly be done if 
relief is not otherwise found, the trustees urge that they be 
relieved of the care of their feeble-minded wards by a suitable 
provision for them in connection with the School for Feeble- 
minded, or in some other way. 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 19 

The replastering and other repairs of three old family houses, 
for which $3,945 was appropriated, has been successfully ac- 
complished. The inconvenience involved in the carrying on 
of such repairs while the houses were in use has been borne by 
the officers and the girls with excellent temper. An addi- 
tional $700, appropriated for improved furnishings, has been 
spent to good purpose. A further appropriation will be asked 
to renew the plumbing and otherwise repair three of the cot- 
tages and to provide a proper sewer bed for the institution. 
Under present arrangements the drainage is little short of a 
common nuisance. 

The appropriation for carrying on the school was $45,872, 
of which $19,387 was for salaries and $26,485 for current ex- 
penses ; and the appropriation for boarding out younger girls 
and for other expenses in behalf of probationers was $5,370, 
with $125 for tuition paid to towns. 

The expenditure for carrying on the school, exclusive of 
money spent on probationers, from Sept. 30, 1903, was 
$47,058.20, which makes a per capita cost of $4.33 gross, and 
$4.30 net. 

The school opened the year with 207 inmates, and closed 
with 215 ; average number, 209. 

In presenting their report, the trustees call attention to the 
provision (Revised Laws, chapter 9, section 5) requiring that 
it be made not later than October 15, and that it shall cover 
an official j^ear ending September 30. The strain of gathering 
and digesting so considerable a body of facts and figures in 
two weeks is very great, and involves corrections and revisions 
when the report is in proof Avhich must be costly. Accord- 
ing^ it is recommended that the time when the report shall be 
called for be extended to November 15. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. H. WALKER. 
EDMUND C. SANFORD. 
GEORGE II. CARLETON. 
M. J. SULLIVAN. 
ELIZABETH G. EVANS. 
CHARLES G. WASHBURN. 
SUSAN C. LYMAN. 



20 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct, 



Minute unanimously adopted by the Trustees of the 
Lyman and Industrial Schools at a Meeting held in 
Lancaster, Thursday, Aug. 4, 1904, All of the 
Trustees being Present, upon the Resignation of 
Miss Elizabeth C. Putnam of Boston. 

The resignation of Miss Elizabeth C. Putnam as a trustee of 
the Lyman and Industrial Schools is an event of such moment 
to her colleagues and to the State as to call for a brief record 
of her labors, for almost a quarter of a century, in behalf of 
the public charities of the Commonwealth. 

Her appointment as a trustee dates from June, 1880. It was 
previous to this event that her attention had been called to the 
fact that girls in the care of the State, when placed out in 
families, were visited by men agents. In 1879 Miss Putnam 
assisted the State Board of Health, Lunacy and Charity in en- 
listing women volunteers who should visit girls in their places 
of employment, for this purpose taking many trips into remote 
parts of this and adjoining States. Meanwhile, as one of these 
commissioned visitors, she went almost daily to the State 
House to assist in emergency work, and to take personal charge 
of girls who passed through Boston on their way to or from 
their places, for several years employing, at her own expense, 
an assistant to aid in this arduous work. The visiting system 
thus developed is now recognized as characteristic of Massa- 
chusetts ; but it was the initiative and unflagging energy of 
Miss Putnam as a volunteer worker which made it possible. 
In a vote of Jan. 5, 1884, the State Board made ample recog- 
nition of Miss Putnam's unique services, the head of the depart- 
ment declaring that she " has been first and there has been no 
second." All this, however, was incidental to her work as a 
trustee. 

In 1880, when she took office, the three institutions then in 
charge of the trustees were far below the standard even of that 
time. The State Primary School at Monson, originally con- 
structed as an almshouse, was inhabited by some 450 children, 
ranging in age from babies to boys and girls of fifteen and six- 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 21 

teen, it being the practice to rear them in the institution until 
they were old enough to earn their way outside. Home life 
instead of institution life was quickly recognized by Miss Put- 
nam as the need of the hour. In co-operation with the State 
Board of Health, Lunacy and Charity, an appropriation was 
secured in 1882 to board out the younger children, and this 
boarding out system was year by year extended, until in 1895 
it became possible to abolish the State Primary School. 

Among all the States of the Union, Massachusetts now stands 
foremost in the practice of home life as against institution life 
for children of the dependent and neglected class. 

The YVestborough Keform School in 1880 was in need of 
radical treatment. Boys were received up to the age of seven- 
teen, and many of the more obstinate were retained throughout 
minority. For the most part they slept in cells, tier above 
tier, and played in yards enclosed by high walls. At times they 
were in a state approaching mutiny. In 1884 the trustees 
secured legislation reducing the age limit to fifteen, this being 
made possible by the establishment of the Massachusetts Ee- 
formatory . The old prison-like buildings were then abandoned, 
and the institution, renamed the Lyman School for Boys, was 
moved to its present location and reconstructed upon the cottage 
system. In 1888, when a new superintendent was needed, 
Miss Putnam, after an investigation which involved a journey 
to Peading, Pa., undertaken at her own expense, recommended 
the present superintendent, who has been never-tiring in his 
efforts to secure better opportunities for the boys, introducing 
manual training and many another of the more modern methods 
of education, now common enough in reform schools, but nov- 
elties even ten years ago. 

When in 1895 it was determined to apply to the Lyman 
School boys often, eleven and twelve the boarding-out system 
which had been so successful with children of the dependent 
and neglected class. Miss Putnam volunteered her personal ser- 
vice, making many a trip into country districts and finding 
abundant delight in the work. The boarding-out method, in 
connection with the opening of a small branch school at Berlin, 
now provides for all boys who are under thirteen when com- 
mitted; and about one-halt' of these children are finally rein- 



22 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

stated in the community without realizing that they have ever 
been in a reform school. 

In bringing the State Industrial School for Girls at Lancaster 
to its present excellent condition Miss Putnam has labored 
without stint. In 1882 she combated strenuously and success- 
fully a bill to remove this institution to the grounds at Monson, 
urging that this plan would be injurious to the primary school 
children and unnecessarily harsh toward the older class of girl 
offenders, who would by the change be sent to Sherborn prison. 
The selection, in 1885, of a woman as superintendent, a posi- 
tion previously held by a man, was largely the result of Miss 
Putnam's initiative, and has made possible the steady and sat- 
isfactory growth which has followed. A branch of the school, 
which was opened at Bolton in 1903, has removed from the 
grounds at Lancaster the more objectionable of the inmates, 
and is a step which has forwarded one of Miss Putnam's most 
cherished ideals for this school. 

Partly by law and partly by custom the trustees previously 
exercised a divided responsibility over their wards during the 
critical years of probation, the visiting system being directed 
by the State Board of Charity. In 1895, at the cost of incal- 
culable effort, in which Miss Putnam as ever took the lead, leg- 
islation was enacted under which the trustees assumed the full 
care of Lyman School boys up to the time of their majority ; 
and they are now in process of assuming a similar undivided 
responsibility toward the probationers of the State Industrial 
School. 

This brief outline of advance in methods and conditions gives 
meagre indication of what each step forward has meant in the 
way of improved opportunity for a multitude of boys and 
girls, and of how unsparingly Miss Putnam has surrendered 
herself to their service. Long night journeys or a start in the 
early morning, visits to girls in the evening or at a six o'clock 
breakfast, have been habitual incidents in her unselfish life. 
Never careful that her services should be recognized, she has 
been content to undertake the most humble offices, and to work 
in indirect and most laborious ways. Never desirous of prom- 
inence, she yet outstripped all her comrades in securing the 
legislation without which improvement in method was impos- 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 23 

sible, and in combating proposed legislation hostile to the in- 
terests of the schools. She has sought always, not to build up 
an imposing institution, but to open a way for the individual, 
to use the institution as a means toward a freer and a fuller life. 
Above all, the standard of what is due from the State to the 
disinherited among its children has been permanently raised in 
Massachusetts by Miss Putnam's twenty-four years of public 
service. 

To the end that her work may be in some measure known 
and appreciated by her successors, and as a token of the respect 
and affectionate regard in which she is held by her associates, 

Resolved, That this minute be spread upon the records, and 
that a copy of the same be sent to Miss Putnam. 

A true copy. 

Attest : 

Elizabeth G. Evans, 

Secretary. 

M. H. Walker. 

Elizabeth G. Evans. Geo. H. Carleton. 

M. J. Sullivan. C. G. Washburn. 

E. C. Saxford. Susan C. Lyman. 

From their official knowledge the undersigned, the Governor 
and all the Ex-Governors now living during whose terms of 
of lice Miss Putnam has served as one of the trustees of the 
schools now known as the Lyman and Industrial Schools, 
heartily assent to the above statement, and desire to add this 
expression of their appreciation of the great value of her ser- 
vices to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in caring for the 
unfortunate wards of the State. 

John L. Hates, 

Governor. 

John I). Long, J. Q. A. Bkackett, 

\V. Murray Cb \m:. 

Ex- Gov < mora. 



24 TREASURER'S REPORT TRUST FUNDS. [Oct. 



TKUST FUND OF LYMAN AND INDUS- 
TRIAL SCHOOLS. 



TREASURER'S REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPT. 30, 1904. 

Worcester, Mass., Oct. 14, 1904. 
To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

I herewith submit my annual report for the financial year 
ending Sept. 30, 1904. 

Lyman School, Lyman Fund. 

1903. Dk- 

Oct. 1. Balance brought toward, $557 89 

3. Greenhouse loan, payment on account, . . . 57 44 
6. Monson Savings Bank, account closed, . . . 1,473 40 

Dec. 15. First National Bank, in liquidation, dividend No. 

1, 15 percent., 150 00 

15. Kinnicutt & De Witt, 10 per cent., ... 100 00 

19. Interest on deposit, 4 11 

24. Commonwealth National Bank tax, rebate, . . 142 00 

1904. 

Jan. 1. Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, . . . 321 75 
1. Worcester Safe Deposit and Trust Company, 

dividend, 6 00 

1. Chicago, Burlington & Quincy joint 4's, interest, . 100 00 

1. Fitchburg Railroad, dividend, .... 115 00 

22. Greenhouse loan, settlement, 15 15 

Feb. 2. Interest on deposit, 1 99 

4. Westborough Savings Bank, account closed, . 1,345 26 
17. Interest on deposit, ........ 3 08 

26. Interest on deposit, 1 32 

April 1. Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, . . . 286 00 
1. Fitchburg Railroad, dividend, . . . . 115 00 
1. Quinsigamond National Bank, dividend, . . 15 00 
1. New London Northern Railroad, dividend, . . 22 50 
1. Worcester Safe Deposit and Trust Company, divi- 
dend, 6 00 

Amount carried forward, . $4,838 89 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 18. 



Amount brought forward, 



Aprr 


1 




20 




20 


May 


10 


June 


13. 


July 


1 




1 




1 




1 




28 


Aug. 


8 


Sept. 


30 




30 




30 




30 




30 




30 



30. 



Chicago Junction and Union Stock Yards Com- 
pany, interest, 

Central National Bank, in liquidation, dividend 
No. 3, 



Interest on deposit, 

Interest on deposit, 

Interest on deposit, 

Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, 
Fitchburg Railroad, dividend, 
New London Northern Railroad, dividend, . 
Worcester Trust Company, dividend, . 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy joint 4's, interest, 

Interest on deposit, 

Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, 
Fitchburg Railroad, dividend, 
New London Northern Railroad, dividend, . 
Quinsigamond National Bank, dividend, 
Worcester Trust Company, dividend, . 
Chicago Junction and Union Stock Yards Com 

pany, interest, 

Interest on deposit, 



Total to balance, 



25 

$4,838 89 

80 00 



100 00 


54 


82 


27 


357 50 


115 00 


22 50 


6 00 


100 00 


26 


286 00 


115 00 


22 50 


15 00 


6 00 


80 00 


1 50 



,147 78 



1903. CR. 

Oct. 6. 4 shares Worcester Safe Deposit and Trust Com 
pany, .... 

8. Prizes to cottagers, 

8. Band instruction, 

8. Crawford entertainment, 

8. Cyclopaedia, 

25. Gospel services, 

25. Redemption of token money 

25. 100 bibles, 

25. Tabiola 

16. Band instruction, 

16. Entertainment for boys, . 

7. Prizes to cottagers, . 

7. Band instruction, 

7. 300 school drill guns, 

10. Redemption of token money 

10. Entertainment of boys, . 



Nov 



Dec. 



1901. 

Jan . 



6. Christmas celebration, 

7. Band instruction, 

7. Prizes to cottagers, . 

Amount carried forward, . 



$900 00 

5 00 

25 00 
10 00 

19 00 

26 00 
100 00 

20 00 
1 12 

25 00 

10 00 

5 00 

25 00 

120 00 

100 00 

10 00 

98 95 

25 00 

16 00 

$1,541 07 



26 TREASURER'S REPORT TRUST FUNDS. [Oct. 



Amount brought forward, 



Jan. 20. 
21. 
21. 
21. 
21. 
21. 
21. 
21. 
28. 
28.- 
Feb. 4. 

4. 

4. 

4. 

4. 
13. 
13. 
13. 
26. 
26. 
March 4. 

4. 

4. 

4. 

4. 
21. 
28. 



April 



20. 

26. 
May 9. 

14. 

14. 

14. 

14. 

26. 

2«. 

26. 
June 15. 



Drill regulations, with manual of arms, 

Gospel services, 

Books, 

Expenses of outing of honor boys, 

Prizes to cottagers, . 

Redemption of token money, . 

Rent of lantern slides, 

A. S. Roe, lecture, . 

Slides, . . 

Stereopticon entertainment, . 

Prizes to cottagers, . 

Alvin Scott, lecture, 

Entertainment of boys, . 

Band instruction, 

10 shares New London Northern Railroad, 

Francis J. Yan Horn, lecture, 

Prizes to cottagers, . 

Stereopticon entertainment, 

Prizes to cottagers, . 

Rental of slides, 

Lessons in basketry, 

Military instruction, 

Expenses of honor boys to Clinton, 

Books, .... 

Band instruction, 

Redemption of token money, 

Prizes to cottagers, . 

Gospel services, 

Prizes to cottagers, . 

Band instruction, 

2 artificial limbs, 

D. E Craft, lecture, 

Military instruction, 

Lessons in basketry, 

Redemption of token money, 

State Safe Deposit Company, box rent, 

Books, 

Check-book, . 

Military instruction, 

Lessons in basketry, 

Band instruction, 

Expenses of trip of honor boys 

A. S. Roe, three lectures, 

Prizes to cottagers, . 

Redemption of token money, 

Expenses of trip of honor boys, 



Amount carried forward, 



1 1,541 07 

4 50 

24 00 

2 64 

7 00 

5 00 
100 00 

6 00 
10 00 

3 20 
10 00 

8 00 
10 00 
10 00 

25 00 
2,250 00 

10 00 
3 00 

5 00 
3 00 
1 50 

25 00 
20 00 
10 00 

9 90 

25 00 
100 00 

10 00 

26 00 

6 00 
25 00 

130 00 
10 00 
20 00 
12 50 

100 00 

5 00 
183 65 

1 50 
20 00 
10 00 
25 00 
14 00 
30 00 

6 00 
100 00 

2 50 

$4,965 96 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 18 



21 



June 15. 


4.UV ui uuynvjui iuw/ u, . 

Military instruction, . . 


15, 


Band instruction, 


15. 


Lessons in basketry, 


27. 


Flag, etc., 


27. 


Slides for entertainment, 


July 14. 


Fire works, 


14. 


C. A. Lakin, extra salary, 


14. 


Prizes to cottagers, . 


14. 


Military equipment, 


14. 


Basket ball, 


14. 


Band instruction, 


14. 


Lessons in basketry, 


26. 


Medals, .... 


Aug. 8. 


Gospel services, 


8. 


Band instruction, 


8. 


Redemption of token money 


3. 


C. A. Lakin, extra salary, 


25. 


A. S. Roe, talk to boys, . 


25. 


Prizes to cottagers, . 


25. 


1 abdominal supporter, . 


25. 


4 belts, .... 


Sept. 8. 


C. A. Lakin, extra salary, 


8. 


Band instruction, 


8. 


Redemption of token money, 


8. 


Prizes to cottagers, . 


12. 


Military equipment, 


29. 


Garden prizes, . 


29. 


Slides and condenser, 


30. 


Balance forward, 



$4,965 96 



30 00 


25 00 


5 00 


15 00 


11 65 


40 05 


50 00 


12 00 


30 50 


2 25 


25 00 


10 00 


14 50 


22 00 


25 00 


100 00 


8 33 


10 00 


6 00 


5 00 


6 00 


8 33 


16 44 


100 00 


9 00 


6 30 


10 00 


11 65 


566 82 



Grand total, 



#6,147 78 



Lymax School, Lamb Fund. 

1903. Dr. 

Oct. 1. Balance forward, 

Dec. 31. Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, 

1904. 

Mar. 31. Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, . 
June 30. Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, . 
Sept. 30. Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, . 

Total, 



$99 


43 


13 50 


12 


00 


15 00 


12 


00 



$151 93 



1904. 

Sept. 30. Balance forward, 



Ck. 



$151 93 



28 TEEASUEER'S EEPOET TEUST FUNDS. [Oct. 



Industrial School, Lamb Fund. 

1903. Dr. 

Oct. 1. Balauce forward, $30 93 

1904. 

Jan. 1. American Telephone and Telegraph Company, in- 
terest, 20 00 

July 1. American Telephone and Telegraph Company, in- 
terest, 20 00 

Sept. 30. People's Savings Bank account, .... 50 00 



Total, $120 93 

1903. CR. 

Nov. 11. Sybil Gage, salary, . $40 00 

1904. 

Jan. 5. Christmas celebration, 50 00 

Apr. 16. Assistant visitor, 25 00 

Sept. 30. Balance forward, 5 93 



Total, $120 93 

Industrial School, Fay Fund. 

1904. Dr - 

Mar. 15. Deposit Worcester Mechanics Savings Bank, . $48 42 

1904. CR. 

May 15. F. F. Morse, superintendent, $48 42 

Lyman and Industrial Schools Investments, Sept. 30, 1904. 

Lyman School, Lyman Fund. 
Bonds : — 
$4,000 Chicago Junction and Union Stock 
Yards Company, .... 
$5,000 Chicago, Burlington & Quincy joint 4's, 

Stock : — 
143 shares Boston & Albany Railroad Com 

pany, 

92 shares Fitchburg Railroad, 
10 shares New London Northern Railroad, 
5 shares Quinsigamond National Bank, 
4 shares Worcester Trust Company, . 
10 shares Central National Bank, 1 . 
10 shares First National Bank, 1 

Amounts carried forward, . 

1 In liquidation. 2 Estimated dividend balance. 



Par Value. 


Market Value. 


$4,000 00 


$3,900 00 


5,000 00 


4,831 25 


14,300 00 


35,607 00 


9,200 00 


12,673 00 


1,000 00 


2,237 50 


500 00 


650 00 


400 00 


900 00 


1,000 00 


20 00 2 


1,000 00 


500 00 2 


$36,400 00 


$61,318 75 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 29 

Amounts brought forward, . . . $36,400 00 $61,318 75 

Savings banks : — 
Amherst Savings Bank, . 
Fall River Savings Bank,. 
Franklin Savings Bank, . 
Palmer Savings Bank, 
People's Savings Bank, . 
Ware Savings Bank, 

Worcester County Institution for Savings 
Worcester Five Cents Savings Bank, 
Worcester Mechanics Savings Bank, 
Worcester North Savings Institution, 
Worcester National Bank, balance, . 



Totals, 



1,668 08 


1,668 08 


1,134 45 


1,134 45 


1,415 72 


1,415 72 


1,529 86 


1,529 86 


1,528 12 


1,528 12 


1,571 66 


1,571 66 


1,704 56 


1,704 56 


982 72 


982 72 


1,050 50 


1,050 50 


1,415 72 


1,415 72 


566 82 


566 82 



$50,968 21 $75,886 96 



Lyman School, Lamb Fund. 
6 shares Boston & Albany Railroad Company, $600 00 

People's Savings Bank, 1,519 36 

Worcester National Bank, balance, . . . 151 93 



Totals, 



$1,494 00 

1,519 36 

151 93 



$2,271 29 $3,165 29 



Industrial School, Lamb Fund. 
$1,000 American Telephone and Telegraph 

Company, 

People's Savings Bank, . 
Worcester National Bank, balance, . 



Totals, 



$1,000 00 

118 08 

5 93 


$957 50 

118 08 

5 93 


$1,124 01 


$1,081 51 



Industrial School, Rogers Fund. 
$1,000 City of Quincy, U per cent, 1922, 1 . $1,000 00 $1,000 00 

Accrued interest, - 139 31 



Totals, 



$1,000 00 $1,139 31 



Industrial School, Fay Fund. 
Worcester Mechanics Savings Bank, . . $1,020 00 $1,020 00 

Examined and approved : M. H. Walker, ) . „ 

_ __ _ V Auditors. 

Geo. H. Carleton, J 

CHARLES G. WASHBURN, 

Treasurer. 



1 Custody of State Treasurer. 



Appendix A. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS 



WESTBOIiOUGH. 



1903-1904, 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

The statistics herewith submitted in the subjoined tables show that 
the average number of pupils has been about 320, varying between 
the extremes of 303 and 344. The number of commitments dur- 
ing the year has been 179. Seventy-seven boys were returned for 
cause other than relocation. This large number of returned boys, 
who have not yet acquired the sense of proportion to grapple with the 
problems of life in the open community, is a demoralizing element 
among boys making their way for the first time to their honor grade. 
The crowded condition of the school makes it impossible to treat them 
separately. The excellent results attained at the Berlin branch for 
small boys suggest the desirability of a detached plant for the sepa- 
rate training of these older and more difficult boys, who at present 
are a distinctly pernicious element. They need a different treatment 
from the boys who constitute the body of the school. 

The school's organization with reference to efficiency was never 
better than it is to-day. The graded school of letters is designed to 
approximate as closely as possible to the standards of the most pro- 
gressive of our public schools. 

Much more attention is given to sense training than is thought ex- 
pedient in the public schools for boys fourteen and fifteen years old ; 
but so many of these boys are behind the grade of attainment of pu- 
pils of like ages in our public schools that an adaptation of kin- 
dergarten methods in the instruction is found to be efficacious in 
stimulating and fostering interest. Sixty of the most backward boys 
are given the benefit of classes in which gymnastic games, greenhouse 
culture, paper form work and clay modelling form conspicuous ele- 
ments. 

There are eight grades in school, the eighth touching on some of 
the studies belonging to the first year of the high school. 

Great stress is laid in all the grades on gaining the ability to read. 
Books which appeal to boy tastes are freely supplied, — history, biog- 
raphy and story. Last winter out of the S200 granted from the 
Lyman fund, 213 volumes were procured, which have been most 
industriously read. 

Drawing and manual training have a prominent place in the cur- 
riculum, while music and gymnastics are given no mean place. 



34 SUPT.'S EEPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

The hours given to school aggregate about thirty a week, distrib- 
uted as follows : grades, fifteen hours ; mauual training, ten hours ; 
gymnastics, one and one-half hours ; a school session on Sunday, 
three and one-half hours. The school work on Sunday is designed 
to place stimulating ideals before the boys, drawn from history and 
biography, both sacred and profane, to afford opportunity for reading 
books which the pupils select from a good boys' library, and to train 
them in music. 

A brass band practises about seven hours a week. A printing 
class of 16 members has about thirty hours a week. The class in 
agriculture has been a conspicuous and useful feature of the school 
work the past year. Mr. Cockburn, the agriculturist, with the co- 
operation of the teachers, has developed a marked interest in agri- 
culture. Upwards of three hundred garden plots were planted and 
cared for by a corresponding number of boys. Good crops were har- 
vested and money prizes were distributed for the most praiseworthy 
results. As a further expansion of the agricultural work, 60 of the 
backward boys are being instructed in greenhouse work, each boy 
having a greenhouse plot of soil about three by four feet. This is a 
feature of the kindergarten adaptation referred to above. 

Mr. Alliston Green, who so ably conducted the physical culture for 
the past ten years, resigned last December. He was succeeded by 
Mr. Charles Willard Wilson, a graduate of the Boston Normal School 
of Gymnastics. He puts great spirit and life into his work, and a 
marked enthusiasm is manifested by the boys. 

An exceedingly desirable adjunct to the gymnasium would be a 
swimming tank. Swimming is a most valuable and attractive all- 
around gymnastic exercise. It is to be hoped that some way of sup- 
plying this facility for physical development may be found. 

Mr. Wilson is a skilled musician, and has taken up the work of the 
department which Mrs. Elizabeth Kimball had conducted so success- 
fully. The prospect of success is most excellent, and the interest of 
the boys marked. 

Military drill has had considerable attention, and the proficiency 
attained is commendable. On Memorial Day the evolutions of the 
cadet battalion won much praise from the citizens of Westborough. 

The manual training classes have been as attractive as ever to the 
boys, and no single force in the school seems so stimulating to dull 
and difficult boys. 

The number of pupils instructed has been 232, distributed as fol- 
lows : in the sloyd classes, 140 pupils ; in the wood- turning and forg- 
ing classes, 74; in the carpentry class, 18. 

The spirit in which the instruction in manual training is given is 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 35 

indicated by an excerpt from a report by one of the teachers. " This 
one point I have tried to keep in view all the year, that if a boy failed 
to be interested or to accomplish the thing undertaken the teacher was 
at fault, and not the pupil." 

During the past year several applications have been made by the 
boys near their honor grade to be allowed to stay and learn a trade. 
This may be a pointer toward the duty of opening the way to teaching 
of trades to certain boys who have stability and purpose enough to 
hold them steady for the few mouths necessary to gain the elements 
of a trade. It would seem reasonable to supply the opportunity to 
those anxious to learn a trade and willing to defer to a future date 
their probationary release that the opportunity might be grasped. 
A few marked cases of success on the part of some thus instructed 
would seem to indicate that there is a field for usefulness which has 
not sufficiently been considered. 

A serious lack of the school is suitable employment for a consider- 
able number of boys out of school hours. The teaching of trades 
might in a measure supply this want. 

The new hospital is nearly completed in a most satisfactory man- 
ner, and is a credit to the teachers and the boy mechanics who have 
built it. 

The farm has been abundant in its response to labor and good 
planning devoted to it. Its returns are a credit to the farmer. 

There is need of a subway for the pipes conducting steam and hot 
water from boilers at the electrical plant to the general kitchen and 
superintendent's house. The present arrangement does not admit of 
ready repairs being made, and repairs already made have so affected 
the insulation covering of the pipes that the efficiency of the line is 
impaired. A subway would make it possible to repair leaks promptly 
and maintain the insulation against heat radiation at a uniform de- 
gree of efficiency. The building of the subway would be an economy 
which ought not to be neglected. 

The excellent health of the school is a source of deep gratitude. 

The loyalty and devotion of the teachers and officers to the work 
are markworthy, and are vital factors in the success of the year's 
work. 

I wish to record my gratitude for your patience and consideration 
with me as well as the hearty support you have uniformly given me. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. F. CHAPIN, 

Superintendent. 



36 FARMHOUSE REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 



EEPORT OF THE MANAGER OP THE 
BERLIN FARMHOUSE. 



To the Superintendent of the Lyman School for' Boys. 

The school at Berlin farm has been unusually small during Sep- 
tember, owing to so many having been placed out where they could 
enter the public schools at the beginning of the school year. Our 
number during the year has averaged about as usual — less than 20. 
Only 2 boys have been returned to their homes. Thirty-nine new 
boys were sent here, and one, who was not doing well at home, was 
allowed to return for a few months, and is now doing fairly well in a 
farmer's family. The average time of detention for the 2 boys sent 
home was fourteen months ; that for those boarded out was a fraction 
over five months. Four were returned to Westborough — 3 for 
running away and 1 because the discipline there seemed better suited 
to his needs. 

Believing that idleness is a curse and industry a blessing to boys 
as well as men, a great effort has been made to keep mind and body 
active, and the varied work of the farm has proved to be peculiarly 
adapted to developing the best that is in the boys. Some are in- 
tensely interested in the poultry yard, watching the fluffy chicks from 
the egg to the roost, carefully guarding them from the marauding 
hawk or crow. Others find their pets among the playful calves or 
gentle cows ; and to all the gardens are a source of wonder and 
delight, — from the first radish or lettuce displayed on the dinner 
table in spring to the long row of Jack o'lanterns reserved for the 
parade on Hallowe'en night. 

The yield of melons has been very good this year. Not only have 
the boys in the school had all they could eat, but it is not unusual to 
see boys boarded on neighboring farms carrying home a big water- 
melon. 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 37 

A great majority of the little boys who come to us have no regard 
for truth. This lack in their early training it is very difficult to over- 
come. A long time is needed to eradicate the habit of falsehood and 
deceit, and firmly implant that of honesty and truth. Our time with 
them is so short we can only hope to make a beginning and trust 
others to continue the work. 

We have at times been doubtful as to the results of the boarding- 
out system, when we have seen how easy it is to undo the work of 
months by a misfit in the new home ; but several cases have been 
noted of late that have gladdened our hearts. In one instance, the 
boy's own father so misunderstood his son as to claim that he had an 
ungovernable temper, hated and abused his younger brother, etc. 
On no account did he want him at home before he was eighteen years 
of age. This same boy is considered in his new home to have the 
sunniest of dispositions. The elderly people with whom he lives are 
learning to look upon him as a child of the house. They say he is 
set in his way, but will listen to reason and yield cheerfully when con- 
vinced that his way is not the best way. When the time comes for 
Charley to be self-supporting it will not be necessary to look farther 
for a home. 

It is often the case that those coming from questionable homes, 
either on account of intemperance or crime, are placed with people of 
culture and refinement ; and it is very interesting to watch the grad- 
ual change in the boy. Even one year in such a home must indelibly 
impress itself upon his future life and character. As usual, I feel 
inclined to lay the blame for most of the short-comings of the chil- 
dren to the wrong teachings of the parents. One father complained 
bitterly of the trouble caused him by his son's propensity to steal. I 

believed, and said, there was reason to hope that H would yet 

be a source of comfort to his parents. " Oh," said he, " I only want 
him to take care of himself. Why, he isn't smart about it. If he 
steals apples he gives them all away before he gets home." My sym- 
pathy was with the generous, free-handed lad (only nine years old) 
rather than with the mistaken father, who seemed to blame the boy 
more for lack of shrewdness than for the act of stealing. 

The visiting days are among the pleasantest of the year. Parents 
who come for the first time to visit their children come always with 
tearful eyes, but in general they return with light hearts. The actual 
surroundings and conditions are so unlike their preconceived ideas of 
the school that they have only words of commendation for the man- 
agement, and good advice for their erring boys. Hence there is no 
risk in allowing free intercourse between parent and child, and it is a 
pleasant sight to see the boys accompanying their visitors nearly to 



38 FARMHOUSE REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

the station, then returning without a moment's delay. The last was 
an ideal visiting day. The high wind of the previous night had cov- 
ered the ground with chestnuts from the trees on or near the farm ; 
and every boy had his store, which he was eager to share with little 
brothers and sisters at home. Every effort is made to keep alive this 
home love, believing as we do that it will be an anchor to hold the 
lad in future years, when he is in danger of drifting to ruin. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EMILY L. WARNER. 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 39 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF 
LYMAN SCHOOL PROBATIONERS. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

Herewith is respectfully presented a brief summary of the work of 
the visiting department for the year 1903-1904. 

The total number of individuals on the visiting list during the year 

ending Sept. 30, 1904, was 1,037 

Becoming of age during the year, 122 

Died 6 

Discharged as unfit subject, 1 

Returned to the school and not relocated : — 

For serious fault, 30 

Not serious, 36 

— 66 
Total number passing out of our care during the year, . . 195 

Leaving on the visiting list Oct. 1, 1904, 842 

This visiting list must not be confounded or compared with the total num- 
ber of boys who have left the school and are not yet twenty-one years of age, 
given in Table No. 3 on page 50, which table includes those who have been 
discharged for one reason or another and are beyond our jurisdiction, and 
whose yiames, therefore, are not among (hose subject to visitation Boys who 
have been transferred from the school to the Massachusetts Reformatory at 
Concord are not on the visiting list, the mittimus having been transferred 
with them, while the names of those who are arrested and sentenced to the 
reformatory by the court are retained among the probationers. 

Classification of Visiting List. 
Of the foregoing 842 boys, 39 (not including those in the foreign service 
of the United States government) are classed B8 OOl <>f the State and employ- 
ment unknown, and 54 are on the unknown list. The occupations of the 
remaining 749 boys, with the number engaged in each employment, are 
shown in the following table : — 



40 VISITATION REPOET LYMAN SCHOOL. [( 


Agent, 


. 1 


Loom fixer, . 


Army, United St 


ates, . . . 22 


Lunch wagon, . 


Assisting parent 


3, ... 6 


Machinist, 


Attending schoo 


I, . . .14 


Manager, 


At board and att 


ending school, . 48 


Marble works, . 


Baker, 


. 11 


Market, 


Barber, 


. 3 


Mason, 


Bell boy, . 


. 2 


Massachusetts Reformatory, 


Bicycle shop, 


. 2 


Milk wagon, . 


Blacksmith, 


... 2 


Mill (textile), . 


Boiler works, 


. 1 


Navy, United States, . 


Bookkeeper, 


. 1 


Occupation unknown, 


Bootblack, . 


. 3 


Organ shop, . . 


Bottling factory, 


. 2 


Other public institutions, . 


Box factory, 


. 5 


Painter, 


Brass works, 


. 1 


Paper mill, . 


Button shop, 


. 2 


Peddler 


Can factory, 


. 1 


Piano shop, .'""". 


Carpenter, . 


. . . .6 


Plumber, . . . . 


Carpet factory, 


. 2 


Porter, . . 


Carriage shop, 


1 


Printer, . 


Chair shop, 


2 


Quarry, . . . 


Cigar factory, 


. 1 


Recently released, occupation 


Clay works, 


. 1 


unknown, . 


Clerk, . 


. 23 


Restaurant, . 


Coachman, . 


. 3 


Roofer, 


Coke yard, . 


. 1 


Rubber works, . 


Comb factory, 


. 6 


Sailor, . . . . 


Conductor, . 


. 1 


Sawmill, . . 


Coremaker, 


. 1 


Screen shop, . 


Electrician, 


. 5 


Shipper, . . 


Elevator boy, 


. . ' . 5 


Shoe shop, 


Errand boy, 


.10 


Silver plating factory, 


Express team, 


. 2 


Skate shop, . 


Farmers, . 


. 129 


Spectacle shop, . 


Fireman, . 


... 1 


Stock boy, 


Fisherman, 


. 1 


Storekeeper, . 


Florist, 


. 3 


Tailor, 


Glass factory, 


. 1 


Tannery, 


Grease factory, 


. 1 


Teamster and driver, 


Hat shop, . 


. 2 


Theatre company, 


Idle, . 


. 21 


Toy shop, 


Insane, 


. 1 


Trunk shop, . 


Invalid, 


. 5 


Upholsterer, . 


Iron works, 


. 8 


Waiter, 


Jeweller's shop, 


2 


Watchman, . . . . 


Laborer, 


. 31 


Wire mill, 


Leather factory, 


. 5 


Wood yard, . 


Lithographer, 


. 3 





1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18, 



41 



Reduced to approximate percentages, this table will show : — 



In United States army and navy, about 

At board, 

Employed on farms, .... 
In mills (textile), about 
Classed as laborers, .... 
Massachusetts Reformatory at Concord, 
In other public institutions, about 
In 82 different occupations, about 



Per Cent. 

9 

6 
18 

6 

4 

5 

2 
50 



The report cards of the above-mentioned 749 boys show that at 
the time of the last report 645, or 86 1 per cent., were doing well; 
43, or 6 per cent., doubtfully ; and 61, or 8 per cent., including those 
while in our care sentenced by the court to the Massachusetts Re- 
formatory or other public correctional institutions, badly. 

Again we have reduced the number of boys whose whereabouts are 
unknown, 54 appearing on that list this year, as against 64 last year. 
There are many causes for this list of boys, but a runaway boy does 
not, by any means, always turn out to be a bad boy. 

An analysis of the unknown list shows that 

25 disappeared this year. 
29 disappeared previously. 

And, again, that of this number 

25 left place with a farmer. 

17 left home or relatives. 

12 not located, family having moved. 

The following figures give the placings, returns, visits and collec- 
tions of wages for two years : — 





1904. 


1903. 


Placings. 

Number of boys placed in their homes when leav- 
ing the school, 

Number of boys placed with others when leaving 
the school, 

Number of boys boarded out when leaving the 
school, 


114 
73 
44 


105 
64 
38 


Total Dumber placed out within the year and 
becoming subjects of visitation, 


231 


212 



1 Runaways from the school and boys transferred to the Massachusetts Reforma- 
tory are not upon the visiting list, bat ;in> counted in the tables given on pages 50 
and 51. Hence the discrepancy between tin' two sets of figures. 



42 VISITATION EEPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 



1904. 



1903. 



Returns. 
Number of boys within the year returned to the 
school : — 

For serious fault, 

For relocation and other purposes, 

Total returned, 

Visits. 
Number of visits to probationers, .... 
Number of visits to boys over eighteen years of age, 
Number of boys over eighteen years of age visited, 
Average visits to boys over eighteen years of age, . 
Number of visits to boys under eighteen years of age, 
Number of boys under eighteen years of age visited, 
Average visits to boys under eighteen years of age, 
Number of homes investigated and reported upon 

in writing, 

Number of new places investigated and reported 

upon, 

Collections. 

Amount of money collected and paid over to the 
Lyman School as wages of boys and placed to 
their credit, 

Number of boys 1 in behalf of whom money was col- 
lected, 



30 


29 


70 


55 


100 


84 


2,127 


1,821 


1,081 


864 


461 


535 


2.3 


1.6 


1,046 


957 


576 


463 


1.8 


2.06 



287 



25 



246 



31 



$2,396 87 
64 



$2,569 86 
67 



1 Boys who are over eighteen are allowed to make their own bargains and collect 
their own wages. Money collected in behalf of boys under eighteen is placed to 
their credit in the bank. 



For some time it has been apparent that the visiting force was in- 
adequate. Tbe constant increase in the number of boys to be visited 
has made it impossible for two regular visitors and the truancy and trans- 
portation officer to do all the work made necessary by these conditions. 

By the vote of your board a new visitor has been added to our 
force. Mr. Thomas Earle Babb, Jr., of Holden entered upon his 
work as visitor May 16 of the present year. He is a young man, 
whose education, sympathy and energy well fit him for the position 
to which he is appointed. Stationed at present in the suburbs of 
Boston, his work has chiefly been with the boys and families in the 
crowded centres of that city and Fall River. Already he has entered 
into relations with the boys in his district which must prove of much 
benefit to them and which give strong assurance of his future success. 

One hundred and twenty-two boys whose names are upon the visit- 
ing list have become of age during the year. The following table 
shows their occupation and standing : — 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



43 



Army, .... 


8 


Machinist, .... 


2 


Brass works, 


1 


Market, .... 


2 


Candy factory, . 


2 


Mason, .... 


1 


Carpenter, .... 


1 


Massachusetts Reformatory, 


6 


Chauffeur, .... 


1 


Mill (textile), . 


3 


Clerk 


5 


Navy, 


10 


Comb factory, . 


1 


Occupations unknown, 


4 


Cook 


. 1 


Other institutions, 


5 


Cooper, .... 


1 


Out of State, 


3 


Drummer, .... 


1 


Painter, .... 


1 


Electrician, 


1 


Paper mill, 


2 


Elevator boy, 


1 


Plumber, .... 


2 


Engineer's assistant, . 


1 


Porter, .... 


3 


Engraver, .... 


1 


Printer, .... 


1 


Express, .... 


2 


Sailor, .... 


1 


Eyelet factory, . 


1 


Shoe shop, .... 


2 


Farmer, .... 


12 


Steam fitter, 


1 


Fireman, .... 


1 


Stove maker, 


1 


Idle 


1 


Suspender factory, 


1 


Insane asylum, . 


1 


Teamster, .... 


3 


Janitor, .... 


1 


Theatre company, 


1 


Laborer, .... 


8 


Unknown, .... 


12 


Lithographer, . 


1 







The above table, expressed in percentages, shows : — 

United States army and navy, about 

Employed on farms, about 

In other penal institutions (including Massachusetts Re- 
formatory), 

Employed in textile mills, 



Per Cent. 

16 
10 

10 
3 



The remaining 62 per cent, is divided among thirty-four different 
occupations. 

15y our usual classification of boys becoming twenty-one years of 
age, 72, or 59 per cent., are doing well without question ; 25, or 22 
percent., not so well, but honestly self-supporting; Id, or 10 per 
cent., badly, 1 1 of them in penal institutions; 12, or 9 per cent., 
whereabouts are unknown. 

The question has been raised whether those boys who, on their 
release from the school, were placed on farms, were or were not han- 
dicapped in their subsequent career by such farm training. We have 



44 VISITATION REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

given this subject careful attention, and below is submitted a com- 
parative table based on deportment, showing the standing of the 45 1 
boys who became twenty-one years of age who were, upon their 
release, placed on farms, and the 82 * boys of the same class who 
went from the school directly to their own homes or to those of rel- 
atives : — 



Standing. 



Of 45 Boys placed on 
Farms. 



Of 82 Boys released 

to their 
Parents or Relatives. 



Doing well without question, 
Not so well, but self-supporting, 
Unknown, .... 
Badly, 



27, or 60 per cent. 
7, or 15 
4, or 10 
7, or 15 



41, or 50 per cent. 
21, or 25 
8, or 10 
12, or 15 



The above table shows to the advantage of the boys who went to 
farm homes, 60 per cent, of the farm boys doing excellently, as against 
50 per cent, of those who were released to parents. 

Again, of the 45 boys who were sent to farms, — 

13 are now doing well on farms, earning good wages. 

14 are doing well in their city homes. 
7 are in the army and navy. 

4 were returned to the school and transferred to the Massachusetts 

Reformatory. 
7 are either unknown or are doing badly. 

The industrial grade of the above 13 boys who have gone from 
farms to the cities compares favorably with that of boys who went 
to the city direct from the school. 

This table, compiled for the first time, deals with a class of boys 
greatly handicapped by their antecedents, and its gratifying showing 
is a source of encouragement. 

Ninety-nine of the 127 boys becoming twenty-one years of age 
were never returned to the school for a second term. 



1 Among these are 5 boys who had previously been on the visiting list but who 
were returned to the school and transferred to the reformatory. It having been de- 
cided that they were not now in the custody of the school they have been omitted 
from previous statistical tables. They are here reintroduced to show the actual 
standing of.all boys becoming twenty-one years of age during the year ending Sept. 
30, 1904, who have ever been subjects of visitation. Not having jurisdiction over 
these boys we have no official knowledge of their present status, but doubtless most 
of them have been released from the reformatory and may be doing well. 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 45 

As in former years we have met once a week in conference and 
once a month with the probation committee of your Board. Added 
to our usual duties we have attempted to visit and report upon the 
homes of all boys as soon as possible after commitment, and while 
this has entailed much extra time and labor, yet the ends sought for, 
viz., first, to determine the probability of the boy's future and there- 
fore the course best suited for him at the school ; and second, a help- 
ful relation established between the home and the visitor, amply justify 
the effort. 

The extensive correspondence begun last year has been continued 
and hundreds of letters are to be seen in our files. Many of these 
letters are full of cheer and show very commendable ambition on the 
part of the writer. I beg leave to introduce a few of these letters, 
appended to a short history of each writer. 

The following extract from a letter was received from a boy of 
foreign parentage who was committed when twelve years of age as a 
" stubborn child." The father was a man of drinking habits and has 
a court record. He remained in the school one year and seven 
months, and at the expiration of this time, his mother being a decent 
woman, he was allowed to go to his home on probation. His record 
has been excellent since his release, and his ambition rose with his 
opportunity. He learned a trade and is now earning $15 per week. 

Mr. W. A. Wheeler, 

Dear Sir: — I received your letter of Sept. 3rd and in reply would say 
that since my release from the Lyman School I have been employed in the 

business and have done well. I thank you very much for the interest 

that you have taken in me and sincerely wish all in authority the best of 
luck. 

Yours truly, 



Another boy of foreign parentage was committed at the age of 
fourteen years for larceny. His own mother died previous to his 
commitment and his father and stepmother were said to be addicted 
to drink. His record shows that he was expelled from three public 
schools for misconduct and was called "a very bad boy." He re- 
mained in the school for three years, the last year being to learn I lie 

trade of . Upon his release his people would not receive him at 

home, but fortunately B place was found for him where he could fol- 
low the trade learned at the school. On the day of his arrival at this 
place he wrote to the Lyman School, telling of his safe arrival in his 
place, and said: 4i I am going to try to succeed." Be has remained 
with the same party to the present time, has mastered his trade and 



46 VISITATION REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

is now a foreman, commanding good wages. He is already married 
and is highly respected. The following letter was received in answer 
to a communication addressed to him from the school in December 
last : — 

Jan. 5, 1904. 

Dear Friend Mr. Wheeler: — Your letter received yesterday and I 
was pleased to hear from you and I thank you for so heartily wishing me 
a Happy New Year. 

If it is not yet too late I wish you many in return. I am still working 

for Mr. and like the trade very much. At present I am getting twelve 

dollars a week. I had a very pleasant Christmas and was invited out to 
dinner. I think I have much to thank the Lyman School for because of the 
start it gave me in life. I would like very much to have seen Mr. Howe 

when he was in . I would be pleased to have you come in and see me 

in my own little home when you are around this way. Hoping to hear 
from you in the near future, I remain, 

Very truly yours, 



The boy who is the subject of the following sketch is now eighteen 
years of age and was committed to the Lyman School at the age of 
fourteen years for offences of larceny, and was called a very clever 
thief. He remained in the school about one year and six months, 
when he was released on probation to his parents. He at once en- 
tered a mill, and at each call of the visitor he has been at work when 
the mill was in operation. He seems to be ambitious and honest. 
The following is a letter received from him in January last : — 

Jan. 1, 1904. 
My Dear friend Mr. Wheeler: — I wish you a Happy New Year 
and thank you for your kind and welcome letter and all my people were 
glad to hear from you. I had a very good time Christmas and hope all the 
officers and boys at the school enjoyed it as well. I am working in the 
weave room and I am getting along very well. My pay is $1.25 a day. I 
hope to get a loom soon which is very good wages, from $12 to $17 a week 
in this mill which is one of the best mills in the city. 

Very truly your friend, 



The following boy is another from the list of boys who became twenty- 
one years of age during the past year. He was of English parentage 
and was committed to the Lyman School at the age of fourteen years. 
His mother died a year previous to his commitment, which may ac- 
count for his waywardness. He had been a truant from school and 
was committed for ''breaking and entering." He remained at the 
school about eighteen months, when he was placed on a farm. Every- 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — JSTo. 18. 47 

where he worked (and he had three places) he gave satisfaction to his 
employers, nearly all his reports being excellent in character. The 
visitor collected over $160 and placed it in the bank to his credit, and 
in his twentieth year he hired with his former employer for a $150 a 
year. Later he worked for Si. 75 per day and now he has two trades. 
He is an excellent farm hand, with a first-class reputation, and he 
works winters as brakeman on a railroad. 

It were an easy matter to multiply histories of like character, but 
perhaps enough have been given to show that in many instances the 
hopes of the visitors and therefore the end of all the training received 
both in and out of the Lyman School have been, in some measure, 
realized. The boys' letters are their own evidence to this end. 

It would hardly be courteous to close this report without an ex- 
pression of indebtedness to your Board for constant advice, to the 
superintendent and officers of the Lyman School for continued help- 
fulness and to each visitor for faithful and conscientious work. 

Financial Statement, 1904. 
Expended for : — 

Salaries of visitors, $4,163 02 

Office furniture, 16 94 

Office assistance, 231 32 

Telephone service, 75 87 

Travelling expenses, . 3,197 04 

Stationery and postage, 102 60 



$7,786 79 
Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER A. WHEELER, 

Superintendent of Lyman School Probationers. 



48 PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. [Oct. 



PHYSICIAN'S KEPOKT. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman School for Boys. 

During the past year 130 patients have been treated in the hospital 
and 235 treated as out patients. Many of the latter came to the 
hospital for treatment day after day, making the amount of out- 
patient work very large. This work, with the almost constant care 
of one or more hospital cases, has kept the nurse in charge very much 
confined. I wish to express my appreciation of the manner in which 
her duties have been performed. 

We are still using the old hospital, the new building not being yet 
completed. There have been a large number of accidents during the 
year, one of which nearly proved fatal. A boy was thrown from his 
sled against a large stone, thus rupturing his spleen. It soon be- 
came evident that the injury was serious and Dr. Stone was called. 
He at once opened the abdomen, which was found completely filled 
with blood, the spleen being badly lacerated and still bleeding freely. 
The boy's condition was critical in the extreme for several days, but 
he finally recovered. He was confined to the bed for some four 
months, during which time the wound was dressed daily. 

We have had one case of typhoid fever which developed in a boy 
who had been in the institution but two days before being admitted 
to the hospital. The case ran a fairly mild course, without complica- 
tions. Two boys were sent to the Massachusetts G-eneral Hospital 
for operations, one for hernia, one for appendicitis. 

Within a few days of each other two accidents occurred in the 
printing room, making it necessary to amputate two fingers in either 
case. Boils and abscesses seem to have been epidemic during the 
entire year. 

While the amount of sickness has been larger than we have a right 
to expect, there have been no fatal cases, and the work of the year 
as a whole has been very pleasant. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. H. AYER. 

Oct. 12, 1904. 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



49 



STATISTICS CONCERNING BOYS. 



Table No. 1. 

Number received and leaving the School during the Year ending Sept. 

30, 1904. 

Boys in school Sept. 30, 1903, 320 

Received. — Committed, . 179 

Returned from place, 74 

Returned " boarded-out" boys, .... 16 

Returned Berlin boys, not boarded out, ... 8 

Recommitted, 2 

Runaways recaptured, 15 

Returned from Massachusetts General Hospital, . 2 

296 



Whole number in school during the year, . 
Released. — On probation to parents, 

On probation to others, .... 

Boarded out, 

Transferred to Massachusetts Reformatory, 

Runaways, ...... 

Massachusetts General Hospital, . 

To go out of State, 



616 



114 
73 
44 
13 
24 * 

2 

3 



273 



Remaining in the school Sept. 30, 1904, 



343 



1 This represents 554 individuals. 

- There were 49 other runaways who were hrought back so promptly that they 
were not recorded as absent from the institution. 



50 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 2. 
Monthly Admissions, Releases and Average Number of Inmates. 



MONTHS. 


Admitted. 


Eeleased. 


Average No. 


October, . 




15 


12 


321.22 


November, 












25 


27 


327.40 


December, 












15 


19 


331.84 


January, . 












12 


16 


325.35 


February, 












16 


21 


321.38 


March, 












21 


22 


314.83 


April, 












24 


33 


303.93 


May, 












33 


36 


307.62 


June, 












34 


32 


310.27 


July, 












33 


21 


309.53 


August, . 












37 


19 


327.67 


September, 












31 


25 


330.60 














296 


273 


319.72 



Table No. 3. 

A. Showing the Status of All Boys under Twenty-one whose Names 

were on the Books of the Lyman School Sept. 30, 1904. 

In the school, 343 

Released from the school : — 

With parents, 401 

With others 107 

For themselves, 60 

At board, 48 

Sentenced to the Massachusetts Reformatory : — 

This year, . 19 

Former years, . .19 

38 

Sentenced to penal institutions other than Massachusetts 

Reformatory, 16 

In insane asylum, 1 

In Hospital for Epileptics, . . . . . . 1 

Left the State, . . .44 

In United States army, . . 22 

In United States navy, 50 

Lost sight of : — 
This year, . . . . . . . . .34 

Previously, . . .20 

842 

Still legally in custody, but beyond practical control : — 

George Junior Republic, 3 

Runaways from the school, whereabouts unknown, . . 32 
Runaways, known to be in other institutions or in the navy, 12 

47 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 



51 



Discharged from the care of the school : — 

Returned to court as over age limit, .... 

Discharged as unfit subjects, to parents, 

Discharged as unfit subjects, to State Board of Charity, 

Discharged to parents to go out of the State, 

Transferred to Massachusetts School for Feeble-minded, 

Transferred to Massachusetts Reformatory, . 

Transferred to hospitals and almshouses, 

Dead, 



6 

7 

1 

6 

13 

40 

5 

16 



94 



1,326 



B. 



Shoiving Conditio)! by Ages of All Boys outside the School, but 
subject to its Custody. 

Condition of all boys under twenty-one on probation up to Oct. 1, 1904 : — 
Doing well, . . . . . . . 674 or 72 per cent. 



Not doing well, .... 
Have been in some penal institution, 
Out of the State, .... 
Whereabouts and condition unknown, 



23 or 3 per cent. 

102 or 11 per cent. 

44 or 5 per cent. 

86 or 9 per cent. 

929 



Conditions of boys under twenty-one on probation one year or more : — 

Doing well, 539 or 74 per cent. 

Not doing well, 19 or 3 per cent. 

Have been in some other institution, . . . 63 or 9 per cent. 

Out of the State, 40 or 5 per cent. 

Whereabouts and conditions unknown, . . 68 or 9 per cent. 

729 
Condition of boys under twenty-one on probation two years or more : — 



Doing well, 

Not doing well, .... 
Have been in some other institution, 

Out of the State 

Whereabouts and conditions unknown. 



436 or 72 per cent. 
18 or 3 per cent. 
67 or 11 per cent. 
33 or 5 per cent. 
52 or 9 per cent 

606 



Condition of all boys under twenty-one on probation who complete their 
nineteenth year before Oct. 1, 1904 : — 

Doing well, 110 or 63 per cent. 

7 or 4 per cent. 
30 or 17 per cent. 
10 or 6 per cent. 
18 or 10 per cent. 

175 

1 Many of these have been transferred in previous years and have now been re- 
leased, but the last information in reijard to them, on the Lyman School books, i-> 
their transfer, which, as the mittimus goes to the reformatory with them, acts as a 
discharge from the school. 



Not doing well, .... 
Have been in some other institution, 
Out of the State, .... 
Whereabouts and conditions unknown. 



b2 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Condition of all boys under twenty-one on probation who complete their 



twentieth year before Oct. 1, 1904:- 

Doing well, 

Not doing well, .... 
Have been in some other institution, 
Out of the State, .... 
Whereabouts and conditions unknown, 



102 or 68 per cent. 

4 or 3 per cent. 
16 or 10 per cent. 

9 or 6 per cent. 
19 or 13 per cent. 



150 



Condition of all boys who complete their twenty-first year before Oct. 1, 



1904 : — 

Doing well, .... 

Not doing well, 

Have been in other institutions, 

Out of the State, 

Lost track of : — 

Doing well at last accounts, 
Not doing well at last accounts, 



92 or 70 per cent. 

2 or 2 per cent. 
21 or 16 per cent. 

3 or 2 per cent. 



14 or 10 per cent. 



132 1 



The report of the superintendent of probationers, on page 39, gives the number 
attaining majority as 122, — 2 runaways from the school and 8 boys transferred to 
the Massachusetts Reformatory being excluded from the list of probationers. 



Table No. 4. 
Cemmitments from the Several Counties, Past Year and previously. 



COUNTIES. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Totals. 


Barnstable, 




67 


67 


Berkshire, 












5 


280 


285 


Bristol, 












24 


783 


807 


Dukes, 












- 


18 


18 


Essex, 












23 


1,269 


1,292 


Franklin, . 












1 


69 


70 


Hampden, 












7 


518 


525 


Hampshire, 












2 


106 


108 


Middlesex, 












45 


1,565 


1,610 


Nantucket, 












1 


17 


18 


Norfolk, . 












5 


517 


522 


Plymouth, 












8 


163 


171 


Suffolk, . 












32 


1,769 


1,801 


Worcester, 












26 


945 


971 


Totals, 










• 


179 


8,086 


8,265 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



53 



Table No. 5. 
Nativity of Parents of Boys committed daring the Past Ten Years. 





05 


05 




r 

00 


05 


o 
o 

C! 


© 


o 


© 

as 


o 

05 


Fathers born in the United States, 


18 


13 


16 


8 


8 


16 


18 


20 


23 


21 


Mothers born in the United States, 


11 


14 


15 


28 


21 


15 


19 


19 


8 


22 


Fathers foreign born, .... 


7 


8 


12 


25 


18 


12 


17 


17 


8 


19 


Mothers foreign born, .... 


25 


6 


11 


10 


17 


16 


15 


14 


24 


19 


Both parents born in United States, 


31 


27 


23 


31 


27 


36 


47 


52 


48 


32 


Both parents foreign born, 


61 


51 


34 


56 


47 


90 


83 


80 


71 


74 


Unknown, 


34 


34 


34 


45 


44 


11 


14 


17 


17 


18 


One parent unknown, .... 


25 


23 


32 


33 


36 


13 


13 


22 


13 


29 


Per cent, of American parentage, . 


29 


28 


31 


27 


25 


30 


35 


37 


36 


30 


Per cent, of foreign parentage, 


42 


40 


37 


40 


39 


60 


54 


40 


50 


52 


Per cent, unknown, .... 


29 


32 


32 


33 


36 


10 


11 


14 


14 


18 



Nativity of Boys committed during the Past Ten Years. 



Born in United States, 
Foreign born, . 
Unknown, 



130 


115 


103 


146 


130 


142 


158 


167 


153 


35 


29 


20 


33 


37 


30 


24 


26 


18 


2 


- 


1 


5 


1 


1 


3 


2 


3 



155 
23 

1 



Table No. 6. 
Authority for Commitments during the Past Year. 



COMMITMENTS. 


Past Year. 


By district court, 

municipal court, 

police court, 

superior court, 

trial justices, 

State Board of Charity, 


92 
26 

48 
2 
4 

7 




179 



54 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL, 



[Oct. 



Table No. 7. 
Age of Boys when committed, Past Year and previously . 



Committed 


Committed 


Committed 




AGE. 


during 


from 


previous to 


Totals. 




Past Year. 


1885-1903. 


1885. 




Six 


_ 


_ 


5 


5 


Seven, . 




- 


- 


25 


25 


Eight, . 




1 


8 


115 


124 


Nine, 




2 


15 


231 


248 


Ten, 




5 


69 


440 


514 


Eleven, . 




9 


154 


615 


778 


Twelve, . 




31 


381 


748 


1,160 


Thirteen, 




53 


701 


897 


1,651 


Fourteen, 




75 


1,140 


778 


1,993 


Fifteen, . 




3 


72 


913 


988 


Sixteen, . 




_ 


13 


523 


536 


Seventeen, 




- 


3 


179 


182 


Eighteen and over, 




- 


- 


17 


17 


Unknown, 




- 


12 


32 


44 


Totals, . 


■ 


179 


2,568 


5,518 


8,265 



Table No. 8. 

Domestic Condition of Boys Committed to the School during the 

Year. 

Had parents, 107 

no parents, . 9 

father 29 

mother, 34 

stepfather, 10 

stepmother, 8 

intemperate father, 53 

intemperate mother, 3 

both parents intemperate, 8 

parents separated, 15 

attended church, 174 

never attended church, 5 

not attended school within one year, ...... 20 

not attended school within two years, 3 

not attended school within three years, * .... 2 

been arrested before, Ill 

been inmates of other institutions, 66 

used intoxicating liquor, 6 

used tobacco, 119 

Were employed in the mill or otherwise when arrested, ... 40 

Were attending school, . ' .67 

Were idle, 72 

Parents owning residence, .14 

Members of the family had been arrested, 61 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



55 







Table 


No. 9. 








Length of Detent i 


on of 249 Boy, 


s who have left during the Year. 


3 months or less, 






18 


2 years 2 months, 






6 


4 months, . 






5 


2 years 3 months, 






5 


5 months, . 






8 


2 years 4 months, 






4 


6 months, . 






1 


2 years 5 months, 






5 


7 months, . 






2 


2 years 6 months, 






4 


8 months, . 






9 


2 years 7 months, 






3 


9 months, . 






1 


2 years 8 months, 






5 


10 months, . 






2 


2 years 9 months, 






1 


11 months, . 






3 


2 years 10 months, 






5 


1 year, 






4 


2 years 11 months, 






5 


1 year 1 month, 






4 


3 years, 






1 


1 year 2 months, 






13 


3 years 2 months, 






4 


1 year 3 months, 






14 


3 years 3 months, 






3 


1 year 4 months, 






19 


3 years 4 months, 






1 


1 year 5 months, 






9 


3 years 5 months, 






2 


1 year 6 months, 






9 


3 years 7 months, 






1 


1 year 7 months, 






6 


3 years 8 months, 






1 


1 year 8 months, 






16 


3 years 9 months, 






2 


1 year 9 months, 






7 


3 years 10 months, 






2 


1 year 10 months, 






9 


3 years 11 months, 






2 


1 year 11 months, 






14 


4 years or more, 






2 


2 years, . 






2 





2 years 1 month, 






10 


Total, 249 



Average time spent in the institution, 20.36 months. 

Average time spent in the institution of boarded boys, . 7.00 months. 
Average time spent in the institution of probationers not 

boarded, released for the first time, 18.23 months, 



56 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 10. 

Comparative Table, showing Average Numbers of Inmates, New 
Commitments, Returns and Releases by Probation or Otherwise 
for Ten Years. 





Average 
Number. 


New Com- 
mitments. 


Returned 

for 
Any Cause. 


Placed on 
Probation. 


Discharged 
Otherwise. 


1894-95 


246.73 


167 


79 


188 


28 


1895-96, 








264.61 


144 


88 


212 


16 


1896-97, 








261.87 


124 


73 


170 


38 


1897-98, 








279.42 


184 


102 


201 


46 


1898-99, 








295.52 


168 


107 


227 


55 


1899-1900, 








299.65 


173 


115 


242 


36 


1900-1901, 








303.89 


185 


107 


208 


56 


1901-1902, 








310.19 


195 


104 


264 


45 


1902-1903, 








323.37 


174 


132 


208 


95 


1903-1904, 








319.72 


179 


117 


231 


112 


Average 


for t( 


m ye 


ars, . 


290.49 


169.3 


102.4 


215.1 


52.7 



Table No. 11. 

Commitments by Months for Ten Years. 





1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


1899. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


October, . 


18 


10 


10 


18 


21 


15 


31 


13 


23 


8 


November, 


9 


6 


10 


12 


15 


18 


12 


13 


14 


16 


December, 


7 


11 


9 


10 


9 


14 


7 


9 


11 


10 


January, . 


5 


9 


8 


11 


13 


8 


15 


10 


4 


8 


February, 


10 


7 


9 


12 


8 


12 


8 


21 


3 


9 


March, 


14 


15 


11 


12 


12 


19 


17 


16 


15 


12 


April, 


18 


10 


11 


15 


14 


14 


11 


21 


22 


16 


May, 


12 


9 


7 


21 


14 


12 


11 


21 


15 


20 


June, 


22 


13 


6 


13 


10 


20 


11 


19 


17 


20 


July, 


20 


23 


9 


22 


22 


13 


15 


20 


15 


17 


August, . 


16 


23 


13 


17 


15 


14 


29 


13 


18 


23 


September, 


16 


8 


21 


21 


15 


14 


18 


19 


17 


20 


Totals, 


167 


144 


124 


184 


168 


173 


185 


195 


174 


179 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



57 



Table No. 12. 

Offences for which Boys were committed during the Year. 



Assault, . . ' . 




. 4 


Malicious injury to personal 




Breaking and entering, 


. 


. 52 


property, . 


1 


Burning a barn, 




. 1 


Malicious mischief, . 


2 


Burning a building, . 




1 


Stubbornness, . 


45 


Burning standing trees, 




1 


Unlawfully taking horse and 




Disturbing the peace, 




. 1 


wagon 


4 


Habitual absentee and 


schoo 




Vagrancy, 


2 


offender, . 




8 


Walking on railroad track, 


1 


Indecent assault, 


. 


. 1 







Larceny, . 




55 




179 



Table No. 13. — Some Comparative Statistics. 

A. Showing the Average Age of Boys released on Probation for the 

Past Ten Years. 





Years. 




Years. 


1895, . 


. 15.49 


1900, . 


15.31 


1896, . 


. 15.17 


1901, . 


. 15.50 


1897, . 


. 15.15 


1902, . 


. 14.42 


1898, . 


. 15.60 


1903, . 


. 14.50 


1899, . 


15.17 


1904, . 


. 15.30 



B. Showing the Average Time spent in the Institution for the Past 

Ten Years. 





Months. 




.Months. 


1895, . 


. 21.17 


1900, . 


. 19.27 


1896, . 


. 18.03 


1901, . 


. 20.25 


1897, . 


21.00 


1902, . 


. 19.53 


1898, . 


. 19.90 


1903, . 


19.03 


1899, . 


. 20.40 


1904, . 


20.36 



58 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



C. Shoiving the Average Age of Commitments for the Past Ten 

Years. 





Years. 




Years. 


1895, . 


. 13.44 


1900, . 


. 13.08 


1896, . 


. 13.63 


1901, . 


. 13.70 


1897, . 


. 13.31 


1902, . 


. 13.38 


1898, . 


. 13.17 


1903, . 


. 13.51 


1899, . 


. 13.48 


1904, . 


. 13.47 



D. Shoiving the Number of Boys returned to the School for Any 
Cause for Ten Years. 



1895, . 


. 60 


1900, . 


. 115 


1896, . 


. 87 


1901, . 


. 107 


1897, . 


. 73 


1902, . 


. 104 


1898, . 


. 102 


1903, . 


. 132 


1899, . 


. 107 


1904, . 


. 117 



E. Showing Weekly Per Capita Cost of the Institution for Ten Years. 





Gross. 


Net. 




Gross. 


Net. 


1895, . 


$4 46 


$4 36 


1900, . 


$4 73 


' $4 70 


1896, . 


4 61 


4 55 


1901, . 


4 47 


4 45 


1897, . 


4 72 


4 66 


1902, . 


4 54 


4 47 


1898, . 


4 52 


4 49 


1903, . 


4 74 


4 72 


1899, . 


4 39 


4 36 


1904, . 


4 90 


4 87 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



59 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



1903. 



1904. 



Current Expenses of the Institution. 
October, received from the State Treasurer, 

November, " " 

December, " " 

January, " " 

February, " " 

March, " " 

April, " " 
May, 

June, " " 
July, 

August, " " 

September, " " 



Bills paid as per Vouchers at the State Treasury. 



1903. 



October, . 
November, 
December, 
1904. — January, 
February, 
March, . 
April, 
May, . • 
June, 
July, . 
August, . 
September, 



$6,969 


14 


5,988 


67 


7,120 65 


10,943 55 


7,259 


39 


8,278 


71 


5,468 


69 


6,021 


15 


6,187 


96 


6,360 43 


5,722 


35 


5,462 00 


$81,782 69 


JRY. 

$6,969 


14 


5,988 67 


7,120 


65 


10,943 55 


7,259 


39 


8,278 


71 


5,468 


69 


6,021 


15 


6,187 


96 


6,360 


48 


5,722 


35 


5,462 


00 


$81,782 69 



Expenditures. 

Bills paid as per Vouchers at the State Treasury (Acts of 1903, Chapter 84) , 

for Boarding. 
1903. — December £1,189 99 



60 FINANCIAL STATEMENT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 



Appropriation (Acts of 1904, Chapter 156) for Boarding. 

1904. — April, $1,262 43 

July, . . 1,229 67 

October,. 1,269 40 



Appropriation (Acts of 1903, Chapter 90) for Hospital. 



1903. — November, 

December, 

1904. — January, 

February, 
May, 
August, . 



$3,761 


50 


il. 

$794 


91 


355 


35 


350 


15 


1,997 65 


1,770 


68 


1,207 


46 



$321 


58 


52 04 


739 


71 


42 50 


123 


17 



$6,476 20 

Appropriation (Acts of 1903, Chapter 90) for Officers'' Addition and School 

Building Porches. 

1903. — November 

December, . . . ... 

1904. — January, . . . . . . . . 

February, . . . . . . . 

May, 

$1,279 00 

Appropriation (Acts of 1904, Chapter 79) for New Oven. 
1904. — August, $1,156 05 

Amounts drawn from the State Treasury. 
Appropriation (Acts of 1903, Chapter 84) for Boarding. 

1903. — December, $1,189 99 

Appropriation (Acts of 1904, Chapter 156) for Boarding. 

1904. — April, $1,262 43 

July 1,229 67 

October ■ . . 1,269 40 



$3,761 50 



Appropriation (Acts of 1903, Chapter 90) for Hospital. 



JlVVO. 


December, .... 


355 35 


1904. 


— January, .... 


350 15 




February, .... 


1,997 65 




May, 


1,770 68 




August, ..... 


1,207 46 



$6,476 20 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 18. 61 



Appropriation (Acts of 1903, Chapter 90) for Officers' 1 Addition and School 

Building Porches. 

1903. — November $321 58 

December, 52 04 

1904. — January, 739 71 

February, 42 50 

May, 123 17 

f 1,279 00 

Appropriation (Acts of 1904, Chapter 79) for New Oven. 
1904.— August, . ' $1,156 05 



Cash Receipts paid into the State Treasury. 

Farm produce sales, $511 33 

Miscellaneous sales, 52 07 

Labor of boys, 11 00 

$574 40 



62 FINANCIAL STATEMENT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 



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1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



63 



Average Cost per Boy per Day (in Cents and Mills) 





Salaries, Wages 
Labor. 


AND 




4) 




a 

03 


a 


□ 

C5 






FOR THE 

YEAR 
ENDING — 


o 

V 


■ 
u 
<x> 

a 

S3 
0> 

H 


a 

o 

o. 

s 


13 
o 


O 

o 

fa 


as 
beg 

— a 

3° 


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a 

a> 

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u 

a 
fa 


m 

Sew 
ft 


T5» 

5 = 
S 

"S o 

s-s. 

03 


a <e 

3 
fa 


3 
O 

a 
a 


cS 
O 


Sept 30, 1899, . 


.095 


.072 


.083 


.252 


.100 


.051 


.018 


.077 


.038 


.051 


.039 


.628 


Sept. 30, 1900, . 


.102 


.072 


.086 


.260 


.102 


.065 


.021 


.075 


.057 


.049 


.050 


.675 


Sept. 30, 1901, . 


.087 


.063 


.099 


.249 


.102 


.047 


.022 


.062 


.062 


.060 


.034 


.638 


Sept. 30, 1902, . 


.081 


.077 


.090 


.248 


.112 


.057 


.019 


.074 


.046 


.048 


.055 


.649 


Sept. 30, 1903, . 


.075 


.073 


.100 


.248 


.099 


.042 


.022 


.085 


.040 


.064 


.077 


.677 


Sept. 30, 1904, . 


.090 


.083 


.097 


.270 


.107 


.049 


.020 


.086 


.049 


.054 


.065 


.700 



u 



SUMMARY LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



SUMMAKY OF FARM ACCOUNT 

For Twelve Months ending Sept. 30, 1904. 



Dr. 
Live stock, agricultural implements and farm produce on 

hand, as appraised Sept, 30, 1903, $11,399 28 

Board, . . . . 312 00 

Farm tools and repairs, . . . . . . . . 540 16 

Fertilizers, 862 30 

Grain and meal for stock, '.---, 2,564 23 

Horse shoeing, 81 82 

Labor of boys 790 00 

Live stock purchases, 664 68 

Ordinary repairs, 44 33 

Rent 360 00 

Seeds and plants, . 212 96 

Veterinary services, . . . 61 75 

Wages, 1,225 00 

$19,118 51 

Net gain, 3,175 82 

$22,294 33 
Cr. 

Produce sold, $511 33 

Produce consumed, . . . 7,015 36 

Produce on hand, 7,506 52 

Livestock 4,231 00 

Agricultural implements, 3,030 12 

$22,294 33 
Poultry Account. 

Dr. 

To fowl and feed, as appraised Sept. 30, 1903, . . . $474 30 

To feed, . . . . 241 37 

To net gain, 29888 

$1,014 55 
Cr. 

By eggs and poultry used and sold, $525 35 

By fowl, feed, incubators, etc., as appraised Sept. 30, 1904, . 489 20 

$1,014 55 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



65 



SUMMARY OF THE PROPERTY OF THE 
LYMAN SCHOOL. 



Real Estate. 



73 acres tillage land, . 

11 acres pasture and wood 1 

72 acres Wilson land, . 

3 acres Willow Park land, 

| acres Brady land, . 

100 acres Berlin land, . 



and, 



Buildings 



Administration building, 

Lyman hall, .... 

Maple cottage, 

Willow Park, 

Wayside cottage, . 

Hillside cottage, . 

Oak Cottage, 

Bowlder cottage, . 

The Inn, .... 

The Gables, .... 

Bakery building, . 

Berlin farmhouse, 

Berlin barn, shed and tool house 

School building, . 

Laundry and power building, 

< liven house, 

Hen houses, .... 

Tool house, bowlder, . 

Scale house, .... 

Piggery, 

Cow barn 

Horse barn, .... 
Hospital building, 



$14,600 00 
1,100 00 
5,040 00 
1,500 00 
1,100 00 
1,100 00 



$10,500 00 

38,000 00 

3,700 00 

5,000 00 

5,900 00 

15,000 00 

16,000 00 

17,000 00 

1,000 00 

9,000 00 

9,800 00 

3,000 00 

1,500 00 

40,000 00 

17,000 00 

1,600 00 

1,000 00 

20 00 

400 00 

260 00 

1 1 ,600 00 

2,700 00 

12,000 00 



$24,440 00 



221.870 00 



Amount carried forward, 



|246,810 00 



titi 



SUMMAEY LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Amount brought forward, . . . . . . . f 246,310 00 



Personal Estate. 



Beds and bedding, . 

Other furniture, 

Carriages, .... 

Agricultural implements, 

Dry goods, .... 

Drugs and surgical instruments, 

Fuel and oil, .... 

Library, 

Live stock, .... 
Mechanical tools and appliances, 
Provisions and groceries, 
Produce on hand, . 
Ready-made clothing, 
Raw material, .... 



$6,350 35 

13,964 63 

840 10 

3,030 12 

5 40 

60 50 

2,479 70 

2,720 85 

4,231 00 

19,559 24 

1,910 42 

7,506 52 

8,878 35 

2,286 75 



73,823 93 



$320,133 93 



HENRY L. CHASE, 

Appraiser. 
A true copy. Attest: T. F. Chapin, Superintendent. 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



LIST OF SALAEIED OFFICERS NOW 
EMPLOYED. 



Theodore F. Chapin, superintendent, . 

Maria B. Chapin, matron, .... 

Walter M. Day, assistant superintendent, 1 . 

Harriet L. Day, amanuensis, .... 

Mr. and Mrs. Morton, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Merrill, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. V. E. Backus, charge of family, 

Mr. Eldred A. Dibbell, charge of family, 

Miss Susie E. Wheeler, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Wiggin, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Keeler, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Tilton, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. Thaddeus Hale, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Hennessey, charge of family 

John W. Mason, painter and mason ! (per day), 

Wm. J. Wilcox, instructor in carpentry, 1 

Emily L. Warner, charge of Berlin farm, 

Mr. and Mrs. Ira G. Dudley, assistants at Berlin farm 

Joseph A. Puffer, principal, .... 

James D. Littlefield, instructor in wood turning and ii 

Anna L. Wilcox, teacher of sloyd, 

Mary F. Wilcox, teacher of sloyd, 

Fannie H. Wheelock, teacher of drawing, . 

Charles W. Wilson, teacher of physical drill and 

J. Joseph Farrcll, teacher of printing, 

Lydia R. Hiller, teacher, .... 

Emma F. Newton, teacher, .... 

Flora J. Dyer, teacher, 

Jennie Kimball, teacher, .... 
Nellie F. Stone, teacher, .... 

Sadie M. Knight, teacher 

Mary A. Bridgham, teacher, .... 
Hattie Wiggins, teacher, .... 
Florence N. Land, charge of central kitchen, 
Clara A. Middlcmas, charge of bakery, 
Cora L. Carey, laundry matron, . 



on work. 



$2,300 00 
400 00 

1,100 00 
400 00 
800 00 
800 00 
800 00 
600 00 
300 00 
600 00 
800 00 
700 00 
800 00 
600 00 
2 75 
900 00 
600 00 
800 00 

1,100 00 

1,100 00 
800 00 
600 00 
600 00 

1,000 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
350 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 



Board themselves. 



68 OFFICEES LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 1904. 

L. Florence Edmunds, housekeeper, $300 00 

Lillia V. Burhoe, assistant matron, 250 00 

James W. Clark, engineer, 900 00 

Irving A. Nourse, assistant engineer and electrician, . . . 800 00 

Frank M. Cockburn, farmer, 900 00 

Henry J. Couper, teamster, 400 00 

John T. Perkins, driver, 400 00 

Thomas T. Carey, watchman, 400 00 

Thomas H. Ayer, M.D., physician, 600 00 

Charles A. Lakin, dentist, 400 00 

May W. Hennessey, nurse, 400 00 

Alexander Quackenboss, M.D., oculist, . . . . . 105 76 

Chapel speakers, 364 00 

Vacation supplies, .......... 1,686 00 

Advisory Physicians, unpaid. 
Orville F. Rogers, M.D. Richard C. Cabot, M.D. James S. Stone, M.D. 



Appendix B 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 

OF THE 

State Industrial School for Girls 

AT 

LANCASTER. 
1903-1904. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

The closing has been no less busy than the preceding year. 
Through special appropriations for the year three of the oldest cot- 
tages, sadly in need of thorough renovation, have been replastered, 
tinted and otherwise improved, making them livable and attractive 
to a degree nearly equal to the newer cottages. Two hundred wash- 
stands, complete with wash bowl and pitcher, towel rack, soap dish 
and tooth mug, all in white enamel iron, have been placed in the 
girls' rooms, together with slight necessary refurnishings. 

The demand of the employer for good laundresses and more effi- 
cient bread makers creating the need of a closer supervision for the 
girl in her training along these lines, the old hospital has been re- 
modelled, — a basement supplying arrangements for washing and 
ironing, — the first floor serving as a bread kitchen. Here the plain 
processes of practical washing and ironing and home bread making 
will be taught under direct supervision of an officer for each depart- 
ment, — an officer whose attention need not be distracted by the 
hundred demands of the general housework kitchen of the home cot- 
tages. The arrangements for the above training are such that there 
shall be no loss to the girl fitting to go into the ordinary family 
kitchen for similar duties. 

New concrete walks have been added to the grounds and old ones 
repaired. The hospital begun last year has been completed and fur- 
nished and is about to be opened. Under ordinary repairs have been 
painting of superintendent's bouse without and retinting within three 
of the newer cottages. The Bolton farmhouse lias been repaired and 
furnished. The schoolrooms have been equipped with maps and 
needed text-books. At the beginning of the year provision was 
asked for a supervisor of the eight schoolroom*. Her work lias been 

most creditable, and the advance in the BChool work fully warrants 
the expenditure. I would suggest that at an increased salary there 
be added to the supervisor's duties those of personally instructing the 
drawing in each schoolroom. 



72 SUPT.'S REPORT INDUSTL SCHOOL. [Oct. 

While it is impossible to estimate with any certainty the permanent 
outcome in the girl of a "year's work, the apparent results in our 
Bolton annex, in affording in its smaller numbers the opportunity for 
the peculiarly distinct and individual work with a class of girls des- 
perately in need of such attention, as well as the seeming happy results 
in Mary Lamb Cottage, set aside for the feeble-minded, have more 
than exceeded our anticipations. The disadvantage in the year's 
work has been the crowded families. While the average for the year 
has been an increase over last year of only 6, the average of the sum- 
mer months, the last quarter, has been 222, against the maximum 
average last year of 206, crowding the cottages to the degree of 3, 4 
and 5 girls in an open attic. Work done under such conditions can- 
not do credit to the institution or the worker. With no marginal 
room for classification, one of the most essential principles of really 
good work is violated. Moreover, the large family cannot receive 
the individual care from the officer as the smaller. That the maxi- 
mum has increased in two years from 202 to 238, is significant of the 
need of some arrangement for increasing numbers. 

Additional opportunities for training call for slightly extended 
time in the institution. While Table IV. shows an average stay in 
the school of two years, its figures are misleading, the average being 
raised by the few exceptional cases whose condition mentally and 
morally has necessitated a stay of four, five and six years in the 
school. Eliminating these exceptional cases, the training has aver- 
aged about one and one-half years. A girl cannot get the most out 
of the training under two years. 

The need voiced in last year's report for renewed plumbing in the 
three old cottages grows more urgent, as well as that for a new sys- 
tem of filtration. 

If, as has been said, it is difficult to estimate in a girl the perma- 
nent results of a year's attempt, it is doubly hard to sum up the yearly 
accumulated effort of the institution. The years alone will give the 
estimate. No more gratifying reports have come into this office than 
during the past year from girls gone out from the school, some recently, 
others in years gone by, — lost awhile to interested benefactors, — 
who are leading prosperous and respectable lives, eager by letter and 
person to proclaim the gospel of the school training. To the earnest 
officer, groping as by faith in hope of future possibilities, such cer- 
tainties serve as a tremendous encouragement. 

From an economic standpoint the year has been a good one. A 
combination of unprecedented numbers, with unprecedented high 
prices in food and clothing materials, has meant the closest financial 
management. While these conditions have necessitated a slight in- 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 73 

crease in the per capita cost, the fruitful yield of abundant garden 
and farm crops, and our enlarged facilities for production of poultry, 
eggs and milk, have very substantially curtailed an otherwise largely 
increased cost. 

The year shows a maximum in numbers of 238 ; an average of 
209; commitments, 93. Current expenditure, $47,058.20; gross 
weekly per capita cost, $4.33 ; net, $4.30. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FANNIE FRENCH MORSE, 

Superintendent. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. [Oct. 



PHYSICIAN'S KBPORT. 



Worcester, Mass., Oct. 13, 1904. 

lo the Honorable Board of Trustees of the Lyman and State Industrial 

Schools. 

Our long-cherished wish for a hospital has been realized, and within 
two weeks we hope to occupy it. The building was ready early in 
the summer, and, but for the furnishings, which were not provided 
for until a later appropriation, we should have had the hospital in 
running order some time ago. Since our last report the school has 
grown steadily, but the average health has remained remarkably good. 
With the exception of one case of typhoid and one of erysipelas, no 
infectious diseases developed during the year. Six pregnant girls and 
five with specific disease were transferred to the Tewksbury hospital. 
Two pregnant girls were cared for at the Clinton hospital. A 
severe case of typhoid was treated at the Clinton hospital, and the 
patient made an excellent recovery. One tubercular subject spent 
seven months at the Rutland Sanatorium and she returned to us much 
improved. Two minor surgical cases were sent to Boston for special 
treatment. We are indebted to the Eye and Ear Infirmary of Boston 
for many attentions to our girls. Skin diseases are rather frequent 
among the new-comers, but with proper care they rapidly disappear. 

With the abundance of fresh fruits and vegetables the diet has 
been liberal and varied, and headache, constipation and indigestion, 
the minor and common ills of humanity, fall far below the ordinary. 
Physical culture, whether on the farm or the gymnasium, assists nature 
materially, and we have a happy, healthy set of girls. It is to be 
regretted that so many feeble-minded children are sent to us. The 
backward and illiterate are hopeful material, but the imbecile is a 
menace. Two epileptics are at present under observation, and as 
soon as possible will be sent to a suitable institution. 

To the trustees, superintendent and officers I wish to express my 
gratitude for the many courtesies which make my visits to the school 
so agreeable. 

Very respectfully yours, 

CLARA P. FITZGERALD, 

Physician 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 75 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF 

THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

PROBATIONERS. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

This has been a year of growth. Beginning with two visitors and 
a clerk on half time, we now have a force of four visitors, a clerk on 
whole time and twenty-two volunteer visitors. Previously we took 
the emergency cases, the especially difficult girls, some of those in 
their own homes, and those who in their last years of minority needed 
help in the transition to self-dependence. We also attended to court 
work, and to the numerous medical and dental cases. We traced run- 
aways, kept in touch with the married girls, and made the acquaint- 
ance of the girls' relatives. Now we have the eutire responsibility 
of all but 33 girls, who, through the kindness of the State Board of 
Charity, are visited by their auxiliary visitors until we secure more 
volunteers. In this connection I wish to express my sincere appre- 
ciation of the hearty and unfailing co-operation of the State Board 
of Charity and its agents, Miss Jacobs and Miss Beale, throughout 
this trying period of transition, when our resources were often taxed 
to the utmost. Their willingness to have the transfer of responsi- 
bility made gradually, girl by girl, always at the most opportune 
time, protected the girl's interests, but it meant for Mi>> Jacobs and 
.Miss Beale much additional trouble and inconvenience, which was 
cheerfully borne. 

We work for improvement in every girl. Our standard varies for 
each individual and is adjusted to her possibilities. It grows higher 
and higher as she progresses. The State asks simple respectability, 
but to be sure of that we Btrive for much more. Temporary safety 
from temptation contents us for the lowest natures, but for them 
alone. A passive condition affords the poorest preparation for re- 
sisting the evil which is sure to come. A girl who, perhaps at home, 
is more or less subject to temptation, bin is happy in real inter 
is making moral fibre that is power to resist when -he ; ' is free" to 
choose. Those who do well in after life alone can justify the ex- 



76 VISITATION REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

pense of our work. I hope some day to look up the conduct of the 
girls who are thirty-five. Our statistics show the encouraging results 
at twenty-one. 

Sept. 30, 1904, there were 542 girls in the care of the trustees, an 
increase of 19 over last year. The number of new commitments was 
93. This number varies little from year to year, the average for the 
last seven years being 91. An increase would naturally be expected, 
but fortunately the preventive forces at work are growing stronger 
every day. The aroused social activity of Massachusetts, with its 
constantly increasing expression, such as settlements, girls' club and 
educational centres ; the greater efficiency of the children's societies ; 
the policy of the State Board of Charity in giving a trial in another 
family to the children who are suitable for placing without institution 
training ; the probation system of the courts, — all tend to a healthy 
reduction of our numbers. The girls who have failed to profit by 
these preventative influences come to us. Twenty-one per cent, of 
those committed or transferred last year and 30 per cent, this year 
had been in the care of some society or on probation to the court. 

On the other hand, many girls who have not been in charge of a 
society should have been sent to the school before their knowledge of 
vice was so complete. Table XXIII. year after year consistently 
shows that a slightly larger percentage of girls committed when under 
sixteen than of those over sixteen have turned out well, but Table 
XXII. shows a greater difference between those who had been taken 
in hand when only in danger of immoral conduct as compared with 
those committed for immoral conduct. 

The conduct of the girls attaining majority this year was the same 
as last year. Seventy-five per cent, were living respectably and 15 
per cent, were doing badly. 

We are trying to have each girl, by the time she is twenty-one, 
settled in her normal place in the world. The first year or two out 
of the school is often a difficult period. The girl has to adjust the 
ideals and standards acquired at the school to different conditions. 
The majority pass this period in places. Later, when in a favorable 
state of mind, the girl goes home, provided the home is suitable ; or, 
if it is not, and she is ambitious, she is started in a trade or mercan- 
tile employment, and lives in some boarding place we find. Those 
who have no homes and are happily contented with housework we 
try to get into places where they become one of the family and a real 
part of the community. 

We are constantly weighing the advantages and disadvantages of 
the home against the place. Of the 64 girls who were placed out 
elsewhere than in their own homes for the first time this year, 11 per 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 77 

cent, during the year were unchaste or in danger of being so ; of the 
twenty-one girls who went directly home to their own families, 39 
per cent, during the year were unchaste or in danger of being so. 
Sixteen per cent, of all the girls in places were returned to the school 
for similar cause, and 28 per cent, of all the girls at home. Of the 
37 girls coming of age this year who had never been back to the 
school for such cause, 67 per cent, were in places, and 33 were at 
home. The girls at home are more likely to marry and settle down 
than the girls in places. This year the proportion of girls in their 
homes to be married is 33 per cent., compared with 17 per cent, in 
places. The difference is somewhat because the girls at home are 
older, but largely because the girls in their homes meet men of their 
own class, under natural conditions. On the other hand, for the 
present year 15 per cent, of the home marriages have turned out 
badly, compared with 6 per cent, of failure among those in places. 
All this proves that no satisfactory rule can be made, but that each 
girl must be studied and treated as an individual. It is seldom pos- 
sible, even where it is desirable, to effect an entire separation between 
our girls and their families. A girl of fifteen — the average age at 
commitment — cannot be expected to break away from her home ties 
although her family connection may often prove a serious hindrance 
to her upward progress. Of the 93 girls committed this year only 
17 had good, normal homes; 32 of the girls were sent to the school 
after running away from home for several days, an offence which 
seemed to quicken even some of the least intelligent and poorest in- 
tentioned parents into action ; 16 of the girls were said by the officers 
attending the trial to be under the average of intelligence. The 
relatives, tired of the burden or worried by the responsibility of pro- 
tecting these latter girls entering womanhood without the safeguard 
of intelligence or will power, sent them to Lancaster, since there was 
no more suitable institution open to such cases for their care. 

April 1 we moved from the office at Dr. Charles P. Putnam's, which 
he so generously gave us for three and a half years, to a larger room 
:it 198 Dartmouth Street, Boston. 

The work of our office the past year is outlined in the following 
statement : — 

Girls seen in plaees, 682 

Girls seen in their homes. 191 

Girls seen elsewhere, 236 

Girls eseorted, 479 

Girls started on boats, 3 

Work hunted with irirls, IS 

Work found, 16 



78 VISITATION REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

Boarding places found for girls at work, .... 18 

Weddings arranged, 5 

Shopping with girls, .43 

Homes visited with girls, .12 

Funerals attended with girls, 3 

Funerals arranged, 1 

Hospital cases, . . . 134 

Girls taken to physicians, 33 

Girls taken to dentists, . . . . . . .35 

Court cases, 8 

Runaways hunted, 23 

Runaways found, . .14 

Parents or relatives seen, 270 

Homes reported on, 88 

Places reported on, . . . . . . . . 211 

Other people interviewed, 482 

Our expenses were as follows : — 

Salaries, $3,406 94 

Travelling expenses (officers), ..... 971 09 
Office expenses : — 

Rent, |191 30 

Telephone, 231 47 

Supplies, 247 44 

Furniture, 332 08 

1,002 29 

Total expended for visiting, $5,380 32 

Travelling expenses (girls), $672 86 

Board, 322 59 

Clothing, 165 33 

Hospitals, medicine, etc., 226 62 

Total expended for girls, 1,387 40 

Grand total, f 6,767 72 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARY W. DEWSON, 

Superintendent of Probationers for the State Industrial School. 

Oct. 1, 1904. 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



79 



STATISTICS. 



Table I. 

Showing Toted Number in Custody of the State Industrial School, 
both Inside Institution and Outside. 

In the school Sept. 30, 1903, 207 

Outside the school, and either on probation, in other institutions, or 
whereabouts unknown, . . . 316 



Total in custody Sept. 30, 1903, 
Since committed, .... 



Attained majority, 

Died, 

" Honorably discharged' 1 from custody for good conduct, 
Sentence reversed, 



523 
93 

616 



65 
2 
6 

1 



Total who passed out of custody, 
Total in custody Sept. 30, 1904, 
Net increase within the year, 



74 

542 

19 



Table II. 



Showing Status Sept. 30, 1004, of All Girls in Custody of the State 
Industrial School, being All those committed to the School who 
are under Twenty -one. 

On probation with relatives, .... 

On probation with relatives out of New England, 
On probation in families, earning wages, . 
At work elsewhere, not living with relatives, 
At academy or other school, self-supporting, 1 

At board, 

Married, but subject to recall for cause, 
Left home or place, whereabouts unknown, 2 
Discharged from Reformatory Prison this year, . 
Discharged from Reformatory Prison former years, 



In the school Sept. 30, 1904, 



49 

21 

138 

5 
10 

1 
47 
33 

2 

1 



307 

215 



1 Occasional help with clothing. 

2 One ran away from the State Hospital. aevei having heen on probation : 1 from 
St. Luke's Convalescenl Borne. 

8 Three hundred and fifty-seven had heen on probation for part or all of the year. 



80 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. [Oct. 



Table II. — Concluded. 
In other institutions : — 

Hospital, 

Insane asylum, 

School for the Feeble-minded, . 
Reformatory Prison, sent this year, . 
Reformatory Prison, sent prior years, 



Total in custody Sept. 30, 1904, 



20 



542 



Table III. 

Shoiving the Number coming into and going from the School. 



In the school Sept. 30, 
Since committed, . 



1903, 



Recalled — 
For change of place, 2 . 

For a visit, 

On account of illness, 

From hospital, .... 

Pending placing with friends, . 

For running away from place, . 

For larcenj 7 , . 

Because unsatisfactory while boarded out 

Because unsatisfactory, 

Because of excessive use of drugs 

For perjury, .... 

Because in danger of unchaste conduct,' 

For unchaste conduct, 4 





207 




93 


Individual i 
Girls. 




19 


42 


17 


30 


5 


8 


15 


15 


1 


1 


4 


6 


8 


8 


2 


2 


22 


28 


1 


1 


1 


1 


16 


17 


27 


27 



138 



Sentence reversed, 

Released on probation to parents or relatives, 
Released on probation to other families, for wages, . 
Released on probation to other families, earning board 

and going to school, 

Married, 

Transferred to a hospital, . . . . . . .17 



i dividual o 
Girls. 




1 


1 


31 


34 


141 


196 


8 


11 


2 


2 


17 


21 



300 



186 & 



486 



1 Counting each individual under most serious cause for return during the year. 

2 One was just discharged from prison ; 1 was preparing to go to school. 
:; Eight were in their homes; 9 were in other families. 

i One had run from the State Hospital; 2 had run from their husbands; 2 had 
ran home from their places ; 9 were in their homes ; 13 were in other families. 

5 Recalled girls: 138 were recalled once within the year; 29 twice within the 
year ; 8 three times within the year ; 1 four times within the year. 

,; Counting each individual under her most recent release. 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 

Table III. — Concluded. 

Individual 
Girls. 

Transferred to insane hospital, 2 3 

. 3 3 



Transferred to Reformatory Prison, . 

Remaining in the school Sept. 30, 1904, 

Table IV. 



205 



81 



271 1 

215 



Showing Length of Training in the School before Girls were placed 
out on Probation for the First Time. 



In places 



l'girl, 
4 girls, 






Years. 
1 


Months. 

4 

1 


2 girls, 
2 girls, 






Years. 

2 
2 


Months. 

4 
5 


1 girl, 

1 girl, 

2 girls, 






1 

1 
1 


2 
3 
4 


1 girl, 

1 girl, 

2 girls, 






2 
2 
2 


7 
8 
9 


1 girl, 
11 girls, 






1 
1 


5 
6 


1 girl, 

2 girls, 






2 
2 


10 
11 


3 girls, 

4 girls, 






1 
1 


7 ' 
8 


1 girl, 
1 girl, 






3 
3 


3 


3 girls, 






1 


9 


1 girl, 






3 


5 


2 girls, 






1 


10 


1 girl, 






3 


7 


2 girls, 






1 


11 


1 girl, 






4 


10 


6 girls, 






2 


- 


1 girl, 






4 


11 


2 girls, 
1 girl, 






2 
2 


1 
3 


1 girl, 
35 girls, 




uni 


, 6 
ler 2 


- 



62 3 girls, on an average of 2 years and 10 days. 




21 6 girls, on an average of 1 year, 7 months and 28 <I;iys. 

1 Released girls: 206 went out once within the year; 4." ( twice within tip' 
9 three times within the year; 1 four times within tin- year. 

Placed in a family to go to school. 

3 Two returned this year f or unchaste conduct ; l because in danger of unchaste 

conduct ; 4 are at large. 

4 To go to Kentucky with her parents, l ; to l>»- married, 1. 

"' Three returned this year for unchaste conduct; '2 because in dangei of it : 2 ftN 

in danger of it now ; 1 is at large. 



82 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table V. 

Showing Length of Training in the School before Girls who had been 
recalled were placed out on Probation again during this Year. 1 



Recalled for unchaste conduct : — 

Mos. Days. 



4 girls, 
1 girl, 
1 girl, 
3 girls, 
3 girls, 
1 girl, 

1 girl, 
3 girls, 

2 girls, 
2 girls, 
1 girl, 



5 

5 
6 
6 
7 
9 
9 

10 
10 
12 



15 

15 
15 

15 

15 



22 girls, on an average of 7 months, 
13 days. 



Recalled because in danger of un- 
chaste conduct 



4 girls, 

1 girl, 

2 girls. 
2 girls, 
1 girl, 
1 girl, 
1 girl, 
1 girl, 
1 girl, 



Mos. 

1 
1 

2 
2 
3 
9 

10 
12 



Days. 

15 



15 

15 

15 
15 
15 



14 girls, on an average of 3 months, 
16 days. 



Recalled for larceny : 



2 girls, . 


Mos. 

. 2 


1 girl, . 


. 3 


lgirl, . 


. 4 


1 girl, . 


. 5 


1 girl, . 


. 8 


1 girl, . 


. 13 



Days. 



15 



7 girls, on an average of 5 months, 
16 days. 

Recalled for running away : — 



lgirl, . 


Mos. 
. 1 


Days 

15 


lgirl, . 


. 2 


15 


2 girls, . 
1 girl, . 


. 4 
. 9 


15 


1 girl, . 


. 13 


15 



6 girls, on an average of 6 months, 
5 days. 

Recalled because unsatisfactory : — 









Mos. 


Days 


2 girls, . . . 


15 


4 girls, 






2 


- 


2 girls, 






1 


- 


4 girls, 






1 


15 


3 girls. 






2 


- 


2 girls, 






2 


15 


2 girls. 






3 


15 


3 girls, 






4 


- 


1 girl, 






6 


- 


1 girl, 






7 


- 


1 girl, 






. 10 


- 



23 girls, on an average of 3 months, 
10 days. 



Not including girls returned for change of place, illness, etc. 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



83 



Table VI. 

Shoiving Number of Relocations of Girls during the Year 



103 were relocated once. 
46 were relocated twice. 
18 were relocated three times. 



11 were relocated four times. 
1 was relocated five times. 
179 1 were relocated 298 times. 



Sixty-two were placed on probation in a family for the first time within this year. 

Table VII. 

Showing Employment of Girls not placed in Families. 



Assisting mother oi 


relative, . 


14 


Factory, shoe-string, . 


1 


Assisting mother, 


who 


jeeps 




whip, . 


. 1 


boarders, 


. 




2 


wire, . 


1 


Attending school, livingathome, 


5 


Housework by the day, 


2 


Dress making, . 






5 


Mill, paper, 


1 


Factory, cigar, . 


. 




1 


silk, .... 


1 


draperies, 


. 




1 


textile, 


3 


neckties, 


. 




1 


Office girl for dentist, 


1 


netting, 






1 


Restaurant or boarding house, 


5 


pianoj . 


. 




1 


Telephone, 


1 


printing, 






1 


Not reported, 


4 


rubber, 






2 







shoe, 






3 




58 ' 



Four others recently gone home. 



Table \ III. 
Showing Cash Account ofGirlson Probation, 

Cash received to credit of 165 girls, from Sept. .",0, 1903, to Sept 

SO, 1904 

By deposits in savings bank on account of 166 girls, . 

By cash on hand, — fractional parts of a dollar could not be de 

posited 

Cash drawn from savings bank on account of 91 girls, from Sept 

30, 1903, to Sept. .SO, 1904, 

By cash paid, 



|2,049 33 
2,020 33 

29 00 

1,909 87 
1,909 87 



84 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. [Oct. 



Table IX. 

Showing Use of Savings withdraivn during the Year. 



USE. 


Number of Girls. 


Amount. 


To prepare for wedding or to start housekeep- 


18 


$563 44 


Board, lodging and car fare while starting in a 

trade. 
School expenses, 


i 2 


41 60 


2 


87 96 


Doctors' bills, medicine, glasses, foot plates 

braces, etc. 
Dentists' bills, . 


12 

9 


77 85 
66 04 


Clothing, 






26 


255 55 


To help at home, 






3 


37 13 


Funeral expenses of father, 






1 


10 50 


Expenses for baby, 






3 


59 27 


Travelling expenses, . 






2 


11 03 


To repay money and articles stolen, 






8 


67 68 


Entire deposit, — to girls going to distant home 


5 


111 45 


Entire deposit, — to girls of age, 1 


26 


520 37 








117 s 


$1,909 87 



1 One has not drawn all her money. 

2 Ninety-one individuals, some drawing for more than one purpose. 

Table X. 

Showing the Conduct of the 74 Girls who passed out of Custody 

ivithin the Year. 1 
Living respectably, 55, or 74 per cent. 

Having behaved badly, 11, or 15 per cent. 

Conduct unknown, 2 3, or 4 per cent 

Conduct not classified, 5, or 7 per cent. 

1 Thirty-seven, or 54 per cent., of these girls had never been returned to the school 
because of unchaste conduct ; 26 had been returned once for unchaste conduct ; 4 
twice, 2 three times. (Counting as returned 4 who were transferred to the State 
Hospital directly from probation and 3 who were doing badly. Non-classified group 
excluded.) 

Thirty-four, or 62 per cent., of the 55 girls living respectably when coming of age 
had never been returned to the school for unchaste conduct. 

Of the girls returned for unchaste conduct, 14 individuals were in their homes, 
or 19 per cent, of all the girls at home ; 19 individuals were in places, or 12 per 
cent, of all the girls in places. (Based on proportion of all girls under age Sept. 
30, 1904, who were in their homes, and likewise of all who were in places.) 

2 One with friends out of New England ; 2 runaways. 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 1 



85 



Table XI. 

Showing ivhere Married Girls met their Husbands, and their 
Present Conduct. 





In theib Places. 


In their Homes. 




Of Age 

St-pt 30, 
1904. 


Under 

Age 

Sept. 30, 

1904. 


Total 
Number. 


Per- 
centage. 


Of Age 

Sept. 30, 

1904. 


Under 

Age 

Sept. 30, 

1904. 


Total 
Number. 


Per- 
centage. 


Living respectably, 

Conduct bad or 

doubtful. 
Conduct unknown, 


13 * 


13 
2 
4 1 


26 
2 
4 


.81 
.06 

.13 


12 2 
l 1 


20 3 
5 4 
3 6 


32 
6 
3 


.78 

.15 

.07 


Totals, . 


13 


19 


32 


- 


13 


28 


41 


- 



Proportion of girls in their places to be married, 
Proportion of girls in their homes to be married, 



14 per cent. 8 
37 per cent. 6 



1 First acquainted : before commitment, 1. 

2 First acquainted: before commitment, 2; after return home, 8; time not 
known, 2. 

3 First acquainted : before commitment, 5, of these 2 were married before going 
out on probation ; after return home, 12; time not known, 3. 

4 First acquainted: before commitment, 1; after return home, 3; time not 
known, 1. 

8 First acquainted: after return home, 1; time not known, 2. 
Based on girls now married and under age, and proportion in places and at 
home Sept. 30, 1904. 

Table XII. 

Hospital Treatment was given the Girls in the Following Cases: 



Eyes, defect of vision, 1 . . 44 


Ankylosis of hip, 


1 


Chalazion, 1 .... 1 


Spinal curvature, 1 . 


3 


Trichiasis, 1 .... 1 


Pregnancy, 3 


6 


Ear, nose or throat inflamed, 1 . 6 


Syphilis, 3 .... 


1 


Otitis media, 2 .... 7 


Vaginitis, 3 


1 


Cervical glands removed, . 1 


Leucorrhea, 1 


1 


Tonsil it is, .... 1 


Ovaritis 


3 


Tonsilotnmy, 1 .... 1 


Cyst on lip, 


1 


PeritonsHar abscess, . . 1 


Cardiac disease, 


8 


Nasal catarrh, 1 .... 1 


Nephritis, 1 


l 


Osteo-myelitis, . ... 1 


Neuralgia, 1 


1 


Pes planus, 1 - ... S 


Tuberculosis, . 


9 


Talipes, 1 1 


Typhoid fever, 


l 


Dislocated patella, 1 ... 1 


Rheumatic fever, 


l 


Synovitis of knee, ... 1 


♦ 




Periostitis of tibia, ... 1 


Convalescing, . 


3 



1 Out-patients. Fife were out-patients. 

8 Condition previous to original commitment to the school, 1. 



86 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table XII. — Concluded. 
Hospitals where treated. 



Boston City Hospital, . 2 1 


Milton Convalescent Home, . 


3 


Carney Hospital, . . . 10 2 


New England Hospital Dispen- 




Clinton Hospital, ... 2 


sary 


1 


Lynn City Hospital, . . 1 


Quincy City Hospital, 


1 


Maiden City Hospital, . . 1 


St. Luke^ Convalescent Home, 


1 


Massachusetts Charitable Eye 


State Hospital, 


6 


and Ear Infirmary, . . 56 3 


Vincent Memorial Hospital, . 


3 


Massachusetts General Hospital, 14 4 


Worcester Isolation Hospital, . 


1 


Massachusetts State Sanatorium, 1 


Cases treated, . 


103 



1 One was an out-patient. 

3 Fifty-four were out-patients. 



2 Seven were out-patients. 
4 Twelve were out-patients. 



Table XIII. 

Showing Home City or Toivn of 93 Girls committed within the Year. 



Boston, 23 


Abington, . 




Brockton, . 






. 1 


Adams, 






Cambridge, 






. 1 


Amherst, . 






Chelsea, 






. 1 


Charlton, . 






Everett, 






. 1 


Clinton, 






Fall River, 






. 2 


Fairhaven, . 






Haverhill, . 






. 1 


Framingham, 






Lawrence, . 






. 3 


Hingham, . 






Lowell, 






. 8 


Leominster, 






Lynn, . 






. 6 


Lexington, . 






Maiden, 






1 


Mansfield, . 






Marlborough, . 






2 


Middleborough, . 






New Bedford, . 






2 


North Attleborough, 






Newton, 






1 


Plymouth, . 






North Adams, . 






3 


Sharon, 






Northampton, . 






1 


Southbridge, 






Somerville, 






3 


Spencer, . 






Waltham, . 






2 


Stoughton, . 






Woburn, 






1 


Truro, 






Worcester, . 






3 


Westford, . 






From 20 cities, 






66 


Winchester, 






Floating, 1 . 






4 


From 21 towns, 




. 23 


1 For years in t 


ae cai 


eof t 


he Stat 


e or of some children's so 


ciety, 


3. 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



87 



Table XIV. 
Showing Technical Causes on 93 Commitments ivithin the Year. 



Stubbornness, 1 . 


54 


Idle and vicious, 


1 


Lewdness, .... 


2 


Vagrant and vicious, 


1 


Lewd and wanton conduct, 


1 


Common night walking, . 


4 


Lewd, wanton and lascivious, 


1 


Larceny, .... 


18 


Leading a vicious life, 


1 


Vagrancy, .... 


1 


Fornication, 


2 


Truancy, .... 


2 


Idle and disorderly, . 


3 


Habitual school absentee,. 


2 



1 The charge of stubbornness simply means that the complaint is brought by the 
parent or guardian, and it may cover any offence, from the least serious to the most 
serious. 



Table XV. 

Showing Ages of 93 Girls committed within the Year. 



9 years of age, . 

11 years of age, . 

12 years of age, . 

13 years of age, . 



14 years of age, 

15 years of age, 

16 years of age, 



17 

29 
28 



Average age, 14 years, 11 months, 24 days. 



Table XVI. 
Showing Nativity of the 93 Girls com miffed within the Year. 



Born in Massachusetts, 


59 


Born in Canada, 


. 4 


Born in New Hampshire, . 


4 


Born in the Provinces, . 


. 5 


Born in Vermont, 


1 


Born in Sweden, 


1 


Born in Rhode Island, 


2 


Born in Germany, 


1 


Born 'm New fork, . 


2 


Born in Russia-, . 


. 2 


Born in Illinois, 


1 


Born in Poland, . 


1 


Born in North Carolina, . 


1 


Born in Italy, 


. 3 


Born in Washington, D. C, 


1 


Bom in Syria, . 


1 


Born in United States, 


71 


Foreign born, 


. 18 






Birthplace unknown, . 


. 4 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 






Table XVH. 

Showing 2' - Parents of f -iris committed within the 

Year. 









nn^zis Iriliiz. 



'2 ' 
16 

1 

: 

•- 

3 
i 



American and French Canadian, 2 

Azfr.: ../:.:::.::;::"::::; : 

3 
1 

■" 

1 
1 

■2 
2 
~ 
1 
1 



American and English, 
American and Scotch, 2 

Azifri:-!" :'.zi Ir:si. 
Aiifri:^z izi G-er:u:i:i. 
French Canadian and English. 
French Canadian and Irish. 
EzgLisi: I' :.::: .'.:: :. : .: .". S:-:::-b 
English and Irish, 
Scotch and Irish, 
^frum mi ?.~sszizz. 



I'-- -::.:-■ 



Showing Domestic Conditio. 



z xvm. 

f the 93 Girls committed within the 



l::z 



:: 



:: i: ::::: 



::::;.': ims :: 



sn:—z 

l: _ r_ ~~ in : z'zzrz 
>: ii:~r. 4 . 



33 

:: 

: 
: 
r 



Te 



Sir - 



?rs or step- 



Sr: ss't inn zt-i. zz.zz.rz~s. , 
Jiiiirrs zzzL-Z-j :i ini-esr, , 
Criminal step-father, 
Temperate mothers or Bfeeg 

nnilcT= 
In t_t:::t Hitlers ir step 

nilhrlS. ... 



: 

: 



13 



Anted from husband, 3 : husband deserted, 2 ; 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 

Table XVIII. — Concluded. 



89 



Criminal mothers, 


2 


Was on the stage, 


1 


Grossly immoral mothers, 1 


8 


Kept house at home, . 


2 


Families on associated charities' 








records, 2 


21 


Committed as under the average 




Mother or woman in charge of 




of intelligence, 


16 


the home worked out, . 


14 


Ran away from home just pre- 




No woman in the home, . 


4 


vious to commitment, 3 . 


32 


Good, normal homes, 


17 


Were under the care of the 




Girl previously worked in mill, 




State Board of Charity, . 


13 


factory or store, 


29 


Been under the charge of 




Worked at housework or caring 




homes or societies, 


4 


for children, .... 


20 


Been on probation from the 




Worked in boarding house, 




courts, 


8 


hotel or restaurant, 


5 


Been in court before, 


5 



1 Guardian, 1. 

2 Looked up: Boston, 18; Cambridge, 3; Chelsea, 1; Fall River, 2; Lawrence, 
3; Lowell, 5; Lynn, 7; Maiden, 1 ; Newton, 2; Soinerville,4; Worcester, 3; total, 59. 

3 Not including those who stayed out single nights. 



Table XIX. 
Showing Literacy of 93 Girls committed within the Year. 



In first year high school, . 


1 


Unable to read, . 


. 6 


Grammar school graduates, 


2 






In 9th grade, 




2 


Recently left school, . 


. 32 


In 8th grade, 








9 


Out of school one year, 


. 14 


In 7th grade, 








12 


Out of school one and a 


half 


In 6th grade, 








10 


years, . . . . 


6 


In 5th iri :ulc. 








9 


Out of school two years, . 


. 23 


In 4th grade, 








21 


Out of school two and a 


half 


In 3d grade, 


• 






16 


years, . 


1 


In 2d grade, 








5 


Out of school three years, . 


8 


In 1st grade, 








4 


Out of school four years, 


. 2 


Could read a 


little French only 


1 


Out of school six years, 


. 1 


Could read a 


little Polish only, 


1 


Never been to school, 


. 6 



90 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



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A.- Living respectably. 
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II. In Care of but no longer maintained by the 
State : - 
Married, living respectably, .... 

Unmarried, with friends, 

At work in other families, 

At work elsewhere, 

Attending school, paying their way, 


Total no longer maintained and living respect- 
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where 

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1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



91 



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189 
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1,585 


Recalled to school for serious fault and re- 
maining, 

In penal institution 

In hospital through their own misconduct, 


Total, conduct bad or doubtful, 

C. — Conduct not known. 

J. Xo longer in the Cure of the Slate : — 

Married, 

Unmarried, 


//. Stilt in the Care of the State : — 

Married, 

On probation with friends, out of New Eng- 
llUnl, ' 

appeared, 

At large, having left their homes or places, 


Total, conduct unknown 

I). — Remainder, whose Conduct for Obvious 
Reasons not classified. 
/. No long, >■ in //,, < nre of the State : — 

(>t tit;.- or discharged, unlit, defective or insaue, 
Died, never on probation 


// 8HUin the tare of the State: — 

III. defective or Insane, in institutions not penal, 
In Btatfl Industrial Hehool through the year, . 
Boarding OOt In private fnmilies with schooling, 
Recalled for illness or ohange of place, not for 
serious fault, and remaining in the school, . 


il whose conduct Is not classilied, 
Grand total 






. B 
2 -3 



as 

■jo 



« CO 

~ S 



92 



STATISTICS INDUSTEIAL SCHOOL. [Oct. 



Table XXI. 

Showing the Cause for retiirn to the School during the Last Four 

Years. 1 





1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 




Num- 


Percent- 


Num- 


Percent- 


Num- 


Percent- 


Num- 


Percent- 




bers. 


ages. 


bers. 


ages. 


bers. 


ages. 


bers. 


ages. 


Change of place, visit, 
illness. 


37 


.37 


56 


.50 


54 


.46 


57 


.41 


Unsatisfactoriness, 


20 


.31 


31 


.28 


23 


.20 


38 


.28 


larceny, p e r j u r y, 
running away. 


















Danger of unchaste 
conduct. 


14 


.14 


14 


.13 


17 


.14 


16 


.12 


Unchaste conduct, 


28 


.28 


11 


.10 


23 


.20 


27 


.20 




99 


- 


112 


- 


117 


- 


138 


- 



Counting each individual under most serious cause for return during each year. 



1904. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



93 



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94 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table XXIII. 

Showing, in the Light of their Age at Commitment (being over or 

under Sixteen Years) , the Conduct of the Following Girls : Those 

in the Care of the School throughout the Year ending Sept. 30, 

1904 ; Those coming of Age during the Year ending Sept. 30, 

'1904; excluding in Both Groups the Non-classifiable Class. 1 





Total 
Number. 


Over 16 
Years. 


Under 

16 
Years. 


Per 

Cent. 

over 16 

Years. 


Per 

Cent. 

under 16 

Years. 


A. — Living Respectably. 
I. JVb longer in the Care of the State: — 

Attained majority (married), living 
respectably, 

Attained majority (unmarried), liv- 
ing respectably, .... 

Died, conduct has been good, . 

Honorably discharged, 


25 

22 
2 
6 


8 
5 

2 


17 

17 

2 
4 


- 


- 


77. In Care of but no longer maintained 
by the State : — 

Married, livintr respectably, 

Unmarried, with friends, . 

At work in other families, . 

At work elsewhere, .... 

Attending school or academy, pay- 
ing their way, 


55 

32 

58 

138 

5 

9 


15 

2 
6 

28 

1 


40 

30 

52 

110 

4 

9 


.79 


.80 


Total no longer maintained and living 
respectably, 

B. — Conduct Bad or Doubtful. 
I. No longer in the Care of the State : — 
Attained majority (married), in prison 

or elsewhere, 

Attained majority (unmarried), in 
prison or elsewhere, 


242 
297 

1 
10 


37 
52 

1 
3 


205 
245 

7 


.69 
.71 


.74 
.75 


II. Still in Care of State, under Twenty- 
one : — 

Married 

On probation with friends or at large, 
Recalled to school for serious fault 
and remaining, .... 
In prison or house of correction, 
Were in prison, now discharged, 
In hospital through their own mis- 
conduct, 


11 

7 
2 

17 
6 
3 

4 


4 
2 

3 

1 

1 


7 

5 
2 

14 
5 
3 

3 


.21 


.14 


Total, conduct bad or doubtful, 

C- Conduct not known. 
I. JVb longer in the Care of the State : — 

Married, 

Unmarried, 


39 
50 

3 


7 
11 


32 
39 

3 


.13 
.15 


.12 
.12 


II. Still in the Care of the State : — 

Married, 

On probation with friends, out of 

New England, 

At large, having left their homes or 

places 


3 

' 7 

9 

33 


1 
2 

7 


3 
6 

7 
26 


.00 


.06 


Total, conduct not known, 

Grand total, 


49 
52 

399 


10 
10 

73 


39 
42 

326 


.19 
.13 


.14 
.13 



i See foot-note to Table XXII. 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



95 





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96 FINANCIAL STATEM'T INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Current Expenses and Salaries. 

1903. — October, received from State Treasurer, 

November, " " " " 

December, " " " " 

1904. — January, 

February, " " " " 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, " u " " 

July, 

August, " " " " 

September, " 







$3,359 21 






3,474 15 






3,005 48 






6,386 38 






4,133 79 






4,956 33 






3,685 06 






5,665 99 






3,593 77 






2,955 18 






3,083 99 






2,758 87 




$47,058 20 



Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury. 

1903. — October, . . . $3,359 21 

November, . . . 3,474 15 

December, 3,005 48 

1904. — January 6,386 38 

February, 4,133 79 

March 4,956 33 

April, 3,685 06 

May, 5,665 99 

June, 3,593 77 

July 2,955 18 

August, 3,083 99 

September, 2,758 87 



$47,058 20 



Current Expenses and Salaries of the Department of Boarding 
Out and Probation. 

1903 — October, received from the State Treasurer, . . . $406 79 
November, " " " " ... 362 31 

December, " " " " ... 849 28 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



97 



« u 



1904. — January, received from the State Treasurer. 
February, 
March, 
April, 
May, 
June, 
July, 
August, 
September, 







$328 69 






569 14 






. 530 80 






. 673 18 






496 69 






546 84 






628 04 






672 97 






702 99 



1903. 



1904. 



Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury. 

October $406 79 

November, 362 31 

December, 849 28 

January, 328 69 

February, 569 14 

March, 530 80 

April, 673 18 

May, 496 69 

June, 546 84 

July, 628 04 

August, 672 97 

September, 702 99 



98 FINANCIAL STATEM'T INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 









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a ' A ' £ ' m ' ' ' a, " S 








Chapel services and entertai 
ments 

Freight, express and transport 
tion, 

Medicines and hospital supplie 

Postage, .... 

Printing and printing supplie 

Soap, laundry, etc., . 
Stationery and office supplies, 
School books and school su 

plies, 

Telephone and telegraph, . 
Sundries, .... 
Blacksmith and supplies, . 
Carriages, wagons and harne 

supplies 

Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., 
Hay, grain, etc., . 
Horses, cows and live stock, 
Tools, farm machines, etc., 








abor, 
ries, 
Is, 

ments 








and 1: 
groce 
ateria 

prove 
odical 














s, wages 
ons and 
ig and m 
tiings, 
id light, 
s and im 
and peri 










Salarie 
Provisi 
Clothir 
Funds] 
Heat ai 
Repair 
Books 





1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



99 



FARM ACCOUNT. 



Dr. 

To live stock, as per inventory, 1903, 

tools and carriages, as per inventory, 1903, 
miscellaneous, as per inventory, 1903, 
produce on hand, as per inventory, 1903, , 

fertilizers, 

farming implements, .... 

grain, 

labor, 

live stock, 

services of veterinary, . 

plants, seeds and trees, . 

harness repairs, 



blacksmithing, 



pasturage, 
wood, 



Cr. 



By produce consumed, 

produce sold and amount sent to State Treasurer 

produce on hand, as per inventory, 1904, 

live stock, as per inventory, 1904, 

tools and carriages, as per inventory, 1904, 

miscellaneous, as per inventory, 1904, 



Balance for the farm, 



|4,524 75 
3,000 00 



1,311 


08 


4,231 


18 


440 81 


91 


49 


3,483 


37 


2,808 82 


538 


29 


78 


30 


211 


40 


12 


90 


184 49 


105 


00 


225 


00 


$21,246 88 


$7,627 58 


376 


50 


5,328 


15 


5,346 


00 


3,100 00 


1,692 


00 


$23,470 


23 


$2,223 35 



100 



PROPERTY INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



VALUATION OF PEOPEKTY. 



State Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster, Oct. 1, 1904. 



Real Estate 



Chapel, . 

Hospital, . 

Putnam Cottage, 

Fisher Hall, . 

Richardson Hall, 

Roger Hall, 

Fay Cottage, . 

Mary Lamb Cottage, 

Elm Cottage, . 

Superintendent's house, 

Laundry and bread kitchen, 

Storeroom, 

Farmhouse and barn, 

Large barn, 

Silo, . 

Holden shop, 

Ice house, 

Wood house, 

Two hen houses, 

Piggery, . 

Reservoir house No. 1, 

Reservoir house, land, etc, No. 2, 

Water works, land, etc., 

Hose house, hose, etc., 

Store barn, 

Farm, 176 acres, 

Broderick lot, 12 acres, 

Wood lot, 10 acres, . 

Storm windows, 

Corn crib, 

Root cellar, 

Bolton annex, 

Farmhouse, 

Barn, 

Amount carried forward, 



$6,500 00 


9,000 00 


16,000 00 


16,000 00 


15,000 00 


12,750 00 


13,000 00 


13,500 00 


4,900 00 


10,000 00 


2,500 00 


350 00 


2,300 00 


12,975 00 


400 00 


300 00 


1,000 00 


600 00 


1,000 00 


1,100 00 


100 00 


300 00 


7,500 00 


2,000 00 


125 00 


11,300 00 


1,000 00 


200 00 


40 00 


100 00 


175 00 


21,000 00 


600 00 


100 00 


$183,715 00 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 



101 



Amount brought forward, 



.$ 183,7 15 00 



Tillage, 33 acres, 
Woodland, 7 acres, . 
Wood and sprout lot, 30 acres, 
Spring, 



Personal Property. 
Produce of farm on hand, 
House furnishings and supplies, 
Live stock, .... 
Tools and vehicles, . 
Miscellaneous, .... 



1,650 00 
350 00 
450 00 
200 00 



$5,328 15 


24,305 06 


5,346 00 


3,100 00 


1,692 93 



$186,365 00 



$39,772 14 



WM. L. BANCROFT, 
ANDREW J. BANCROFT, 

Appraisers. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Worcester, ss. Lancaster, Oct. 7, 1904. 

Personally appeared the ahove-named appraisers, and made oath to the foregoing 

statements. 

George E. Howe, 

Justice of the Peace. 



102 



OFFICEES INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



LIST OF SALARIED OFFICERS NOW 
EMPLOYED. 



F. F. Morse, superintendent, 










. $1,500 00 


A. Hawley, assistant superintendent, . 








600 00 


G K. Wight, steward, . . . 








650 00 


C. P. Fitzgerald, M.D., physician, 








600 00 


N. C. Rudd, clerk, 








400 00 


M. E. Richmond, teacher of music, 








. • 400 00 


I. G. Prouty, teacher of sloyd, 








500 00 


M. B. Atherton, teacher of gymnastics, 








1 200 00 


A L Jordan, matron of Bolton, . 








550 00 


E. H. Church, Mrs., matron of hospital, 








400 00 


A. M. T. Eno, matron, 








400 00 


H. A. Woodward, matron, 










400 00 


E. A. Bartlett, matron, . 










400 00 


C. C. Russell, matron, . 










400 00 


M. Drown, matron, 


. 








375 00 


E. F. Peel, matron, * . 


. 








350 00 


J. E. Clark, matron, 


. 








350 00 


M. C. Westcott, matron of Bolton farmhouse, 








260 00 


H. B. Shaw, supervisor of schools, 








240 00 


A. M. Sturges, teacher, . . . . 








350 00 


A. G. Mansfield, teacher, 












350 00 


E. A. Greenlaw, teacher, 












350 00 


L. A. Strout, teacher, . 












325 00 


F. J. Ovens, teacher, . 












325 00 


E. A. Brown, teacher, . 












300 00 


A. M. Kelley, teacher, . 












300 00 


L. M. Greenlaw, teacher, 












325 00 


B. G. Foss, housekeeper, 










• 


350 00 


J. G. Griffin, housekeeper, 












350 00 


A. A. Stowell, housekeeper, 












350 00 




* Vi 


)V six months, 











1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 103 

A. Crocker, housekeeper, $350 00 

M. L Smith, housekeeper, 350 00 

A. J. Smart, Mrs , housekeeper, 325 00 

L. Eastman, housekeeper, 325 00 

W. T. Bryant, housekeeper, 300 00 

C. Goss, housekeeper, 300 00 

I. N. Bailey, housekeeper, 300 00 

V. P. Wightman, vacancy officer, 400 00 

E. E. Eames, gardener, 325 00 

E. P. Woodbury, foreman of the farm, 590 00 

D. H. Bailey, carpenter, 540 00 

B. V. Smith, foreman of Bolton, 420 00 

E. W. Harrington, dairyman, 384 00 

A. E. Brown, driver, 360 00 

A. J. Smart, teamster, 360 00 

W. B. Eastman, teamster, 360 00 

H. B. Eastman, care swine and poultry, 360 00 

W. Westcott, gardener, 312 00 

J. Patmore, laborer, 312 00 



104 VISITORS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. [Oct. 1904. 



VOLUNTEER VISITORS. 



Putnam, Miss Elizabeth C, . . . . . At large. 

Andrews, Mrs. Charles A., . . . . . . Holyoke. 

Brewer, Mrs. Frank C, . . . . . . . Hingham. 

Cowles, Mrs. William N., . . . . . Ayer. 

Cross, Miss Mary E., Fitchburg. 

Edgett, Miss Ruth F., . . . . . . . Beverly. 

Ely, Miss Amelia M., Dedham. 

French, Mrs. E. V., Lynn. 

Fuller, Mrs. Frederick T., Milton. 

Hall, Miss Emma R., New Bedford. 

Harlow, Miss Margaret, Worcester. 

Hagelstein, Miss Sophie, Lawrence. 

Leonard, Miss Lizzie C, ...... Bridgewater. 

Moore, Mrs. A. C, . . Lowell. 

Reed, Miss Clara G., Springfield. 

Rockwell, Miss Florence, Montague. 

Shattuck, Miss Elizabeth, . . . . . . Boston. 

Strong, Miss Maud E., . . . . . . Northampton. 

Symonds, Dr. Alice G., Haverhill. 

Warner, Mrs. Charles H., Fall River. 

Whiting, Mrs. Howard, Great Barrington. 

Woodbury, Miss Alice P., . . . . . Gloucester. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT . . . . 



. No. 18. 



ELEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 



Lyman and Industrial 
Schools 



(Formerly known as Trustees of the State Primary and 
Reform Schools), 



Year ending September 30, 1905, 







BOSTON: 
WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 
1906. 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Trustees' Report on Lyman School, 5 

Trustees' Report on State Industrial School, 15 

Report of Treasurer of Trust Funds, 22 

Appendix A, Report of Officers of the Lyman School: — 

Report of Superintendent, 31 

r 

Report of Berlin Farmhouse, 37 

Report of Superintendent of Lyman School Probationers, .... 40 

Report of Physician, 49 

Statistics concerning Boys, 51 

Financial Statement, 61 

Farm Account, 65 

Valuation of Property, 66 

List of Salaried Officers, 68 

Appendix B, Report of Officers of the State Industrial School : — 

Report of Superintendent, 73 

Report of Physician, 79 

Report of Superintendent of Industrial School Probationers, ... 81 

Statistics concerning Girls, 86 

Financial Statement, -105 

Farm Account 109 

Valuation of Property, 110 

List of Salaried Officers, 112 

List of Volunteer Visitors, 114 



Commctthxealijj of llfassacjjtt&eits. 



LYMAN AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS. 



TRUSTEES. 
M. H. WALKER, Westborouoh, Chairman. 
ELIZABETH G. EVANS, Boston, Secretary. 
CHARLES G. WASHBURN, Worcester, Treasurer. 
GEORGE H. CARLETON, Haverhill. 
M. J. SULLIVAN, Chicopee. 
SUSAN C. LYMAN, Waltham. 
JAMES W. MCDONALD, Marlborough. 

HEADS OP DEPARTMENTS. 
THEODORE F. CHAPIN, Superintendent of Lyman School. 
THOMAS H. AYERS, Visiting Physician of Lyman School. 
WALTER A. WHEELER, Superintendent of Lyman School Probationers. 
FANNIE F. MORSE, Superintendent of State Industrial School. 
CLARA P. FITZGERALD, Visiting Physician of State Industrial School. 
MARY W. DEWSON, Superintendent of Industrial School Probationers. 



Camm0n:foraIllj d fjtessarjwsdts. 



TEUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honor-able Council. 

The trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools respectfully 
present the following report for the year ending Sept. 30, 1905, 
for the two reform schools under their control. 

LYMAN SCHOOL FOE BOYS AT WESTBOROTJGIL 

The Lyman School receives boys under fourteen years of 
age, who are committed to its care by the courts, retaining au- 
thority over its wards until they reach their majority. Almost 
one-quarter of the boys are committed upon the request of their 
parents ; the rest are brought in by the police for minor offences 
against the law. 

There is a main branch of the institution at Westborongh, 
with accommodations for 280 inmates in ten cottage groups ; 
and a minor department at Berlin, some seven miles distant, 
with accommodations for 24. Boys who are under thirteen are 
;it «>nce sent over to Berlin, where the majority of them are soon 
placed out at board, to attend the district school and to take 
their pari once more as members of the community. Those who 
misconduct while they are on trial are recalled to the main 
branch of the school, to receive ;i longer and more systematic 
training. At Westborough s marking system is so planned thai 
release can be earned in a year by exceptionally good conduct, 
the time being Lengthened proportionally by bad conduct. 

Of the 322 boys released within the year, there bad been: — 



Tn the school 3 months or less, 
In the school 3 to 6 months, . 
In the school 6 months to 1 year, 
In the school 1 year to 1£ years, 
In the school 1£ years to 2 years. 
In the school 2 to S years, 
In the school 3 to 4 years, 



2.5 
2;> 
23 
81 
64 
80 
24 



6 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

Fifty of those who went out in less than one year were from 
Berlin. 1 It is found possible to reinstate about half of the 
Berlin boys in the community without ever allowing them to 
have associations with the boys at Westborough. Four hundred 
and four boys have been cared for at Berlin since the cottage was 
opened ten years ago. 

The educational methods in use at Westborough are well up 
to modern requirements. Drawing, music, manual training in 
sloyd, in wood turning and iron work, are emphasized in the 
curriculum. There are daily gymnastic classes, with special 
attention to the development of the mentally and physically 
defective. An honor class, with excursions off the grounds, and, 
for the advanced grade, the privilege of going home for a visit, 
is working satisfactorily. Further details of the methods of 
the school will be found in the superintendent's report, on page 
31. 

No question is more vital than whether or not a boy shall go 
home when he leaves the school ; and a hard and long day's work 
is in order when the superintendent, the visitors and the trus- 
tees come together in probation committee. About half the boys 
are allowed to go home without much question. A few have no 
homes to go to, and for them a farm is the one livelihood that is 
open, where a home goes with the job. This a boy may not 
appreciate ; but he will usually accommodate himself to circum- 
stances when he understands the facts of the case. It is in 
regard to boys who have homes, but bad ones, that the difficult 
questions arise. How far shall the desires of immature lads and 
of unworthy parents be allowed to prevail? No hard-and-fast 
line can be drawn. Each case must be considered on its merits, 
and often a decision must be reversed if a boy's co-operation 
cannot be gained. Sometimes the only way to convince him is 
to let him have his own way, reckoning that he can be recalled 
if things go ill. 

The following is from a father whose boy, after much urgency 
on both sides, was sent home on trial, and a year later recalled 
to the school, to be soon placed out: — 

1 Some of the others were Berlin boys returned from boarding-places and soon 
placed again. 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



Mr. T. F. Chapin. 

Dear Sir : — Yours of Mar. 30, received. You did right in not 
sending [my son] home. Yon did wrong in putting him to work 
outside the school, he will run away inside of two months. He 
will be good when he is locked up. When he is free he will go to 
the bad fast. Yours respectfully, 



Six months have now passed, and in spite of his father's harsh 
expectations, the boy is still doing well, the last report from the 
visitor reading, " Satisfied and happy in his home, and giving 
good satisfaction." 

Table No. 3, on page 52, which gives the condition of every 
Lyman School boy who is under twenty-one, shows that 443 of 
them are on probation with their own people, against 132 who 
are with farmers (including in this figure 47 little boys at 
board) and 138 who are " f or themselves," as the phrase goes, 
or in the army or navy. 

The following comparative table makes analysis of the con- 
duct of the boys who each year have come of age 1 since the visita- 
tion department w T as first started, in 1895 : — 

1 Under this head runaways from the school who have never been returned, and 
boys transferred to Concord without trial outside the school, are included. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 















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1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 9 

The point of chief interest in the table is the striking increase 
in the number doing well. 

Examining the individual histories of the 62 per cent, classed 
above as doing well, it is found that 78 of them have done well 
throughout their whole term of probation, while 16 have been 
at some time returned to the school for bad conduct. Inquiring 
as to the present occupation of this group, it is found that 8 of 
them are farming and 86 are at work in cities. Of this 86, 22 
had formerly been on farms, and located later in the city. An 
analysis made last year of boys who went to their own homes 
direct from the school and those who went direct to farms, shows 
that the latter were at no disadvantage as to occupation when 
they attained manhood, but that, upon the contrary, the ease 
with which they can shift to the country when out of work is a 
distinct advantage, especially in times of industrial depression. 
As to the moral influences on farms, the table on page 45 in 
the report of the superintendent of probationers shows that 78 
per cent. 1 of the boys who went to farms have done well, as 
against 69 per cent. 1 who went to parents or relatives. 

In addition to visiting the boys in their homes and places, 
a large correspondence was carried on. Erom a hasty perusal 
nf a batch of letters from boys, found in the office one day last 
winter, the following are selected : — 

The first is from a boy now nineteen years of age, who was 
sent to the school from one of our large cities for breaking and 
larceny. He had been arrested twice before for a similar offence. 
His people are respectable, and from their home he writes: — 

, , Jan. 13, 1905. 

Mr. Walter Wheeler. 

Dear Sir: — Yours received of the 9th and very much pleased 
to hear from you. and thanking von for the Happy New Year wish 
and I wish yon a good many fco come. 

ron hope dial I may have very little time to spend in idleness, 
and T have very little time to throw away as I am going to take 
up the course of Mechanical Drawing and I guess that when r put 
my mind on that 1 will have very little time in throwing away. 

' These per cents, are higher than the figure given in the table abov< 
Well, as in that table are included boys who ran away from the school or were 
transferred to Concord without ever having been on probation. 



10 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

I am at present working for the , and if ever yon shonld 

happen to pass by there step in and call on me. I am at present 
running a lathe bnt will be grinding for them soon as I was hired 
in to do it. 

I have been doing that kind of work for two years and I loafed 
9 months '•and that was quite a long time. 

I wonld like to get in some automobile Station and learn what I 
can about Electric, don't you think that is sensable. 

Well Mr. Wheeler I would like to take a trip out to Westboro and 
have a look at the place once more but I would like to get an invita- 
tion as I would like to take my lady friend and gentleman friend 
with me. 

If you think I can come and be able to visit the place I would 
like to go. 

Thanking you for your letter and hoping to hear from you again, 
I remain Yours truly 



The second letter is from a boy now seventeen years of age, 
who upon leaving school went to an aunt in Jersey City : — 

Dear Mr. Wheeler, Lyman School, Westborough, Mass. 

Dear Sir : — I received your letter and was very glad to hear 
from you, as I am geting along fine, but I am very sorry that I 
didn't write to you sooner. I forget all that is gone by and in the 
future I know I am going to do better. I suppose you know I am 

working in the and doing fine sence I been working there I 

was put helper on a single wagon and they pay at the rate of six 
dollars a week and about five months ago I was put on a double 
wagon and they pay ten dollars a week and now I am getting ten 
dollars a week and expect driver of a single wagon soon and they 
pay at the rate of $50 dollars a month and you know that is great 
miney of a boy of my age. But you asked me in the letter what 
my trade was gowing to be. I will stick to this till I will be over 
age than I will take trade to be a Locomotive fireman, you know 

I got a little touch of it up to the School when used to be 

tending it. 

It is now Sunday morning and that I must go to Mass; tell Mr. 
Chapin and my Master and Matron Mr. Lougee and Mrs. that I 

will write soon hoping and is out. Hoping you and all 

the Schooll a Happy New Year Yours friend 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 18. 11 

The writer of the following letter has a drunken father with 
a bad court record, and no settled home; his mother is dead. 
From the school the boy was placed out on a farm ; he is almost 
eighteen years of age. Tie writes : — 

, , Jan. 15, 1905. 

Dear Sir: — I received your letter and was glad to hear from 
you. I do farmer work such as take care of the twelve head of 
cattle three horses hens geese and turkeys. I chop wood in my 
spair time, the days are short and it takes quite a little time to do 
the choir night and morning. I like to do any kind and of farm 
work that I can do. When I become of age I want to work on a 
farm. Very truly yours, 



The following is from a little boarded boy with drinking 
parents, who came to the school at the age of eleven : — 

, , Jan. 8, 1005. 

My dear Friend : — I received your letter and was very glad 
to hear from you and I thought that I would write to you some 
evening but I put the letter away and never thought of it until 
this evening. 

I had a nice Christmas, and I learnt a peice to speak, and spoke 
it on the night before Christmas at the schoolhouse where I go to 
school. 

We all enjoyed a good time and a fine programme. 

I hope that you and the boys and all the rest of you enjoyed your- 
selves as much as I did. 

Mr. got me a book which was the life of Gen. Sheridan and 

it is ;i very good book although 1 have not read much of it. 

I go to school every day excepl when they don't have any. 

Our teachers name if Mrs. and I guess thai nil the school 

Like her anyway r do. 

Last term of school we started in on precentage and we got along 
pretty well with it, then we went into interest and we got along 
pretty well with that. And so we have started this term with pro- 
portion and we are getting along with it fine. 

We are taking the big Metcalfs Green Geography, Metcalfe bine 
grammar. Wentworths Arithmetic, Metcalfe Speller, history, and 
reader. 

We have had three big storms and T had to stay home from 



12 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

school one day but Mr. had to stay home from work three 

days. 

They have a singingschool down here and I go every night. 

I hope yon had a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. 

Good by from yonr Friend 



The writer of the last letter here given will soon attain his 
majority. He was almost fifteen years of age when he came to 
the school for the offence of stubbornness. When he was ready 
to go out on probation, it was found that his father drank and 
was indifferent to the boy's welfare; likewise the mother, who 
did not care whether he came home or not. The boy's own pref- 
erence was to go out on a farm, as he had previously worked in 
a mill, and did not like it. 

, , Jan. 11, 1905. 

Dear Mr. Wheeler : — Will you please send me whatever money 
there in your care that belongs to me. I am now in the IT. S. ser- 
vice, if you remember there were seven dollars left behind at Mr. 

the last place I work. I left Dec. 2 and enlisted on Dec. 

9, 1904. I in good health and I am thankful to you and all of the 
officers that look after my interest. I was tired of going around the 
way I was so I thought this was the best I could do. I will now 
close because the bugle is calling. With a great many thanks to 
you Good-by 

My address 



The above letters were by no means the only ones among those 
examined which expressed gratitude to the school and a good 
hope for their writer's own prospects in life. 

Eor further details in regard to boys on probation, readers 
are referred to the report of the superintendent of probationers, 
on page 40. 

A new feature within the year has been a monthly visit to 
the school by Dr. Arthur Jelly to examine feeble-minded or 
abnormal boys, with a view to determining their proper treat- 
ment. Eight boys have been brought before the probate judge 
at Worcester, and six of them were committed to the Massa- 
chusetts School for the Eeeble-minded. It is customary in such 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 13 

cases to notify the parents, that they may appear in opposition 
if they so desire. In the case of two boys in whose behalf the 
parents and the selectmen put up a strong protest, the judge 
suspended action, recommending that they be tried at home, to 
see if they could get on there. Two other boys, whom Dr. Jelly 
pronounced decidedly feeble-minded, were released to parents, 
because it was felt it would be impossible to hold them in a 
custodial department without the parents' co-operation. A 
special file to be kept relative to all cases which Dr. Jelly has 
studied should be the means of better determining what degree 
of intelligence properly constitutes a claim to freedom and self- 
direction, — a question upon which light is needed. 

The practice of recalling boys who misconduct outside, for a 
further period of training, is essential to the probation system; 
but it has its drawback in bringing into the school a certain 
number of older boys whose influence upon the others is unde- 
sirable. Further, for the boys of sixteen and upward the Lyman 
School is in many ways unsuitable. Over and above all this, 
the school is crowded far beyond its proper capacity. A branch 
school upon the lines suggested in last year's report would seem 
the most effective way of meeting the situation, and this plan is 
again recommended by the trustees. In default of such a pro- 
vision, the trustees must urge as an imperative necessity an 
appropriation for another cottage, and for a building in which 
to offer further trade instruction. 

The construction of a subway connecting the laundry building 
with the superintendent's house and the kitchen, for which 
$1,500 was appropriated, has been a godsend this summer by 
providing real Labor for ever} one who could be spared from 
other tasks. It will be completed before the winter sets in. X" 
labor was hired. 

The subway should be i xtended one hundred feel further, to 
the schoolhouse. The cosl of «> doing will not exceed ;i few 
hundred dollars, and will be offsel by the saving in dud. Facili- 
ties for bathing are needed in connection with the gymnasium, 
and n>il<.t accommodations foT the use of the officers a1 Berlin, 
where the arrangements .ire very primitive. Also, a dough mixer 
m the bakery Is recommended. This is guaranteed to Boon pay 
tor itself by the economy it effects in flour. The cosl of these 



14 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct, 

four items is estimated at $2,500, for which an appropriation 
will be asked. 

The Lyman School Opened this year with 343 inmates, and 
closed with 330. The whole number of individuals in the school 
during the year was 613, while the average number was 336. 
There were 191 new commitments. There were 862 names upon 
the list of the probation department on September 30 ; of these, 
however, 212 were beyond practical control, 52 of them being 
in the army or navy, 49 in Concord or some other institution, 
44 had left the State, and 56 whereabouts unknown, leaving 
650 subject to supervision by the department. 

The appropriations for running the school the past year were : 
for salaries, $32,766; for current expenses, $49,500, — a total 
of $82,266 for running the institution. To be expended in 
behalf of probationers : for tuition fees to towns, $600 ; for 
visitation, $9,000 ; for boarding, $5,000. The expenditure in 
behalf of probationers was $14,473.76. The expenditure in be- 
half of the institution from Oct. 1, 1902, to Sept. 30, 1903, was 
$81,175.38. The per capita cost of the institution was $4.63, 
and $395.76 was turned into the State treasury, making a net 
per capita cost of $4.61. The per capita cost for the family at 
Berlin was $2.96 ; x the per capita cost of visitation was 18.4 
cents per week, and the per capita for the whole body of boys 
in the care of the school, whether as inmates or probationers, 
was approximately $1.43 per week. 

1 This figure takes account only of the outlay for the Berlin family, and does not 
charge to it any expense of the central administration. 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 18. 15 



STATE INDUSTEIAL SCHOOL FOE GIELS AT 
LANCASTEE. 

The State Industrial School at Lancaster attempts a similar 
task for girls to that undertaken for boys at Westborough. At 
both institutions the children are received by sentence of court, 
at both the period of control is for minority, and at both a com- 
paratively brief term of training in the school is followed by a 
long period of probation. The institution is not merely a place 
of education ; much less is it a place of punishment ; rather it 
is considered a point of departure for young people who have 
made a false start, but whose lives are still before them. It is 
toward this future that every effort is directed. 

The domestic training which the school furnishes is very 
thorough. Each girl goes through a course in different branches 
of housework, being promoted from the less to the more skilled 
occupations, as a recognition of good work done. Three hours 
a day are spent in the schoolroom. A few of the girls are capa- 
ble of taking advanced work, but most of them are dull and 
backward, and a few can barely read or write. Eor those whose 
education has been so neglected, school is uphill work for pupils 
and teachers. A principal who goes from room to room, strength- 
ening teachers when they are weak and giving instruction in 
Bpecial subjects, lias done much to raise the standard of the 
-«di< »f>l inu". Much attention is paid to singing, and a course for 
every girl in slovd is found to be of very great value, and is ;i 
Bource of real delight. The girls all attend classes in gymnastk-s. 

In the summer there is ;i two months' vacation from the school- 
room. This was long thought a thing that could not be man- 
aged, where pupils remain upon ili< b grounds the year round. 
Bu1 the superintendent, whom obstacles do not daunt, has 
brought the impossible to pass, and lawn-mowing or other out- 
door work such as wooding or gathering vegetables, go to fill 
up the hours that must not be left idle. Baseball contest? be- 
tween the differenl cottages, roll of honor parties, and an autumn 
•'"I'n roast, are favorite forms of recreation. On the whole, 



16 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

in spite of the many restrictions beyond what would obtain in 
an ordinary boarding-school, the girls are happy at Lancaster, 
and look back upon it with affection. To go there for a visit is 
regarded as a privilege. Last year 51 girls went back for a visit, 
for change of place, or for care during sickness. 

One of the cottages, so far as its dimensions will allow, is 
used for feeble-minded inmates. In the other households the 
girls are classified on the line of their experiences before com- 
mitment. This goes far to prevent the contamination of the 
relatively innocent by those more versed in wrong-doing. The 
cottage located upon the adjoining farm at Bolton altogether 
removes from the grounds the girls who are returned for the 
most serious offences, and the most degraded among the new- 
comers. This gives a better tone to the school at Lancaster. 

Fully one-third of the Industrial School girls are a selection 
by failure from other charitable agencies, such as the House of 
the Good Shepherd, the Children's Aid Society or the State Board 
of Charity. Many of them have been previously on probation, 
and have been allowed to run wild far too long. As a rule, they 
come from very wretched homes. Mother or step-mother " crim- 
inal," or " grossly immoral," is recorded of 12 girls ; 2 had 
" grossly immoral " fathers. " ~No woman in the house " is on 
record against 7. Of 4, " no home " is given. " Good normal 
homes " are attributed to only 14 ; x and even where parents are 
respectable, they are often lamentably incapable. 

More than half the commitments are at the request of parents. 
This by no means indicates that the offence has been simple 
disobedience, for too often the parents have deferred action till 
their daughters have gone very seriously wrong. Indeed, there 
is frequently little to choose between those who are sent for 
" stubbornness," and those against whom shameful failings are 
written down. Often the best capacity is found in girls with a 
most direful past. As an instance, one girl who came to the 
school on the charge of " lasciviousness " has just received an 
honorable discharge, — a recognition accorded to few. In her 
case, her own father was one of those who degraded her. Eor 
three years now she has lived in one family, and it is with 
friends made there that she is about to go to another State.* In 

1 If a mother is away at work all day, her home is not classed as normal. 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 17 

the recommendation for her discharge she was characterized 
as a " splendid girl.'' 

The probation work with which the girls are followed when 
they leave the school is directed by Miss Mary W. Dewson. 
She is assisted by six paid visitors and twenty-six volunteers. 
The latter are scattered in various parts of the State, and most 
of them visit only one or two girls. Between 30 and 35 girls 
are found as many as a visitor who gives her whole time can 
care for and do her work well. It is time-consuming to take a 
ward to Boston on a shopping expedition, entering into her 
interest in clothes; but this is a sure road to her heart. A 
bright-haired young visitor recently mentioned a ward who 
seemed devoid of interests and ambitions. Presently it was 
discovered that she longed to take singing lessons; so a way 
was found to gratify her desire, and she became like a different 
creature. " When I went to see her the other day," said her 
visitor, " I passed the afternoon playing accompaniments, and 
we had a beautiful time together. Her voice is really charm- 
ing." Visiting of that character is a very different matter from 
a perfunctory call to listen to the employer's complaints and 
administer advice at stated intervals. 

Housework is the one kind of labor for which there is always 
a demand, and where, moreover, a girl is comparatively shielded 
from temptation. But most young women prefer other kinds 
of work; and accordingly it is attempted to start our girls at 
something else before they pass out of our care. By showing 
herself trusty, a girl may graduate from the closer control of 
housework just as she earns her release from the school. By 
the time she is twenty-one it is expected that she will be settled 
in her normal place in the community. Occasionally one or 
another finds factory work and life in a meagre tenement less 
attractive than she anticipated, and is glad to return to the 
humdrum decencies of housework. ]\ x ow and then a girl finds 
b real home with her employer. A delicate little creature named 
Kffie is a case in point. It seemed impossible to make her self- 
supporting; but she is now earning fifty cents a week with a 
lady whom she calls " mama," and who treats her as she would 
her own child. Effie is filled with delight at being taught to 
cook. She helps with the care of the children, and sin^s as she 



18 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

goes about her work, as happy as a bird. Against 136 girls at 
work in families are 76 engaged in miscellaneous employments. 

It is sometimes said that one reason housework is unpopular 
is the restricted opportunity it offers for marriage. The sta- 
tistics on marriage of our girls would seem on their face to bear 
out this thesis, Table XII (page 93) showing that only 18 per 
cent, of those in place get married, against 39 per cent, of those 
who were living with parents or relatives. It must be borne in 
mind, however, that the girls in place are as a whole of a less 
marriageable age. This, and the fact that marriage in extreme 
youth is a doubtful advantage, raises a question as to the deduc- 
tion to be drawn from the above figures. The proportion of 
those who are living respectably in marriage is slightly in favor 
of those who met their husbands in their places, being 81, against 
78 per cent. 

The girls in places are encouraged, and even required, if 
possible, to save some part of their wages. Within the year 
$2,196.20 has been put in the savings bank to the credit of 177 
different girls, and $2,294.55 has been drawn out by 106 depos- 
itors, more than half of which sum went to prepare for a wedding 
or to start housekeeping. 

In her first report as superintendent Miss Dewson said : — 

We work for improvement in every girl. Our standard varies for 
each individual, and is adjusted to her possibilities. It grows higher 
and higher as she progresses. The State asks simple respectability, 
but to be sure of that we strive for much more. Temporary safety 
from temptation . contents us for the lowest natures, but for them 
alone. A passive condition affords the poorest preparation for re- 
sisting the evil which is sure to come. 

This high ideal has been kept steadily in mind by all engaged 
in the work of the probation department. 

Table X on page 91 shows that 68 per cent, of those coming 
of age were living respectably. In making this statement, it is 
realized that, as a gauge of the school's success, it is a most 
imperfect one. For instance, a girl who several years ago had 
an illegitimate child shortly before she became twenty-one, was 
classed as doing badly ; but she has been supporting herself and 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 19 

her child ever since. Among this year's girls is one with a 
very doubtful past, who has just married a man she seems to 
care for, and has gone to New York. According to a super- 
ficial standard, she might be said to be living respectably, and, 
indeed, there is hope that her future will make good such a 
claim ; but on her record while in our care she is classed as doing 
badly. On the other hand, there is a considerable per cent, 
who are kept respectable only by the school's authority, 1 and 
who will too probably relapse when they are free. All of which 
goes to show the innate impossibility of truly classifying live 
facts like human beings, which change before ever one's breath 
is cold. Nevertheless, the value of such analysis is enormous 
in helping one to review one's own work and to profit by past 
experience. 

For further details the reader is commended to the report of 
the superintendent of probation, on page 81, with appended 
tables, giving information upon many points not usually tabu- 
lated. 

The large number of feeble-minded girls, to whom attention 
was called a year ago, are still a heavy burden upon the institu- 
tion; but through the hearty co-operation of the trustees and 
the superintendent of the Massachusetts School for the Feeble- 
minded, progress has been made toward a solution of this vast, 
difficult problem. Nine 2 girls have already been received by the 
School for the Feeble-minded, and under advice from Dr. 
Arthur Jelly, those who can be classified as simple custodial cases 
are being gradually eliminated from Lancaster. Border-line and 
otherwise abnormal cases will, however, remain a perennial 

1 Such a condition is far more true of the girls than of the boys, who are allowed 
a far greater degree of freedom while on probation. With the girls it is agreed 
that, if tided successfully along through extreme youth, they may marry and settle 
down ; while the hope for a boy is to learn to stand on his own feet and make his 
own way in the world. Without doubt this greater freedom during probation 
explains the smaller proportion of hoys who are doing well the year they come of 

be per cents, standing 02 against 68 in the girls' favor ; and this in spite of the 
fact that the hoys on the whole are of better material than the girls. 

2 One of these had been sent the previous AugUSl to tin- Reformatory Prison at 
Bherborn ; but Bhe was considered so manifestly feeble-minded that it was arranged 
she should be transferred to the School for the Feeble-minded. Just as at Lan- 
caster, however, she was so licentious and so violent as to drive the authorities <rf 
the School for the Feeble-minded to their wits' end. Finally she was pronounced 
insane, and committed to an asylum. Her case Is typical of a Dumber of others 
who are standing puzzles in the various Institutions, and in the world. 



20 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

source of perplexity. Under present conditions, when the school 
has done what it can, such girls must be gotten out into the world, 
somehow, to be dealt with by the probation department as best it 
may. By following such cases closely, and analyzing results, a 
body of experience will at least be gained which may lead, by 
and by, to custodial care for some who would nowadays be 
classed as responsible agents. 

The hospital, which was opened last October, is proving of 
value beyond what was anticipated. Many cases receive treat- 
ment there who would formerly have gone to Tewksbury. Teeth 
and eyes are under the care of specialists. The nurse, who is 
rarely qualified for her work, gives attention to ailments which 
were formerly overlooked. In the light of what is now accom- 
plished, it is realized that formerly the State has done too little 
for the physical needs of its Lancaster wards. 

The renewal of the plumbing in four of the cottages, for 
which an appropriation of $6,300 was made, will be soon com- 
pleted within the appropriation. 

Still one cottage remains to be renovated, and it ought to be 
done this year. Also, $1,000 will be asked to complete the 
hospital equipment, which is only partly furnished, and to equip 
a laundry and bakery, where the instruction of the cottage 
housekeepers in these branches will be supplemented. 

A proper storeroom is an urgent need of the institution. At 
present, provisions which are purchased in bulk must be kept 
in half a dozen different places, and perishable articles must be 
bought at retail. The superintendent estimates that a cold- 
storage room would allow a saving of $1,000 a year. 

Still another institution need is a silo. Figures upon the 
above items will be supplied later. 

The method of sewage disposal at the school is emphatically 
condemned by the State Board of Health. This has been called 
to the attention of the Legislature several times. The estimated 
cost of a sewage bed is $11,550. 

The probation department expended $9,167.09, of which 
$7,499.25 covered the salaries and travelling expenses of the 
visitors, and office expenses; and $1,667.84 was spent directly 
upon girls, for car fares going to and from their places, doctor 
and hospital bills, and board or clothing of such as were not 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 21 

self-supporting. Four hundred and sixty-nine individuals were 
under the care of the department within the year, at an average 
cost of 38 cents a week. 

The appropriation for carrying on the school was $48,392, of 
which $20,707 was for salaries and $27,685 for current ex- 
penses. The expenditure for carrying on the school, exclusive 
of money spent on probationers, from Sept. 30, 1904, was 
$47,325.89, which makes a per capita cost of $4.35 gross and 
$4.33 net. The per capita cost for the whole number in the 
care of the school, including inmates and probationers, was 
$1.75 a week. 

The school opened the year with 215 inmates, and closed with 
209 ; average number, 209. There were 79 new commitments. 

Trust Funds. 
It is provided in section 1 of chapter 86 of the Revised Laws 
that this Board shall be a corporation, for the purpose of taking, 
holding and investing, in trust for the Commonwealth, any 
grant, devise, gift or bequest made for the use of any institu- 
tion of which they are trustees. It is the opinion of the trustees 
that this duty should devolve upon the State Treasurer or some 
other State official, and it is recommended that legislation be 
enacted which shall accomplish this result. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. H. WALKER. 
ELIZABETH G. EVANS. 
M. J. SULLIVAN. 
GEORGE H. CARLETON. 
CHARLES G. WASHBURN. 
SUSAN C. LYMAN. 

james w. Mcdonald. 



22 TREASURER'S REPORT TRUST FUNDS. [Oct. 



TEUST FUND OF LYMAN AND INDUS- 
TEIAL SCHOOLS. 



TREASURER'S REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPT. 30, 1905. 



Worcester, Mass., Oct. 2, 1905. 
To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

I herewith submit my annual report for the financial year 
ending Sept. 30, 1905. 

Lyman School, Lyman Fund. 
Dr. 



1904. 


Sept 


30 


Oct. 


20 




20 




20 




21 




21 




21 




21 




21 




21 




21 




24 


Nov. 


8 


Dec. 


10. 




23 


1905. 


Jan. 


1 




3 




10 




10 




10 




10 




16 


Feb. 


10. 


Mar. 


10. 



Balance brought forward, .... 

People's Savings Bank, dividend, 
Worcester Five Cents Savings Bank, dividend, 
Worcester Mechanics Savings Bank, dividend, 
Amherst Savings Bank, dividend, . 
Fall River Savings Bank, dividend, . 
Franklin Savings Institution, dividend, . 
Palmer Savings Bank, dividend, . . . 
Ware Savings Bank, dividend, .... 
Worcester County Institution for Savings, dividend 
Worcester North Savings Institution, dividend, 
Worcester County Institution for Savings, 

Interest on deposit, 

Interest on deposit, 

Commonwealth National Bank tax, rebate, 



Interest on deposit, 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy joint 4's, interest, 
Fitchburg Railroad, dividend, .... 
Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, 
New London Northern Railroad, dividend, 
Worcester Trust Company, dividend, 
Palmer Savings Bank, account closed, 

Interest on deposit, 

Interest on deposit, . . . 



Amount carried forward, 



$566 82 


55 18 


35 52 


40 50 


64 76 


44 04 


54 94 


52 15 


61 00 


64 00 


54 94 


50 00 


1 32 


1 70 


20 84 


1 32 


100 00 


115 00 


321 75 


22 50 


6 00 


1,503 56 


2 30 


1 35 



$3,241 49 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



23 



Amount brought forward, 



April 10. 
10. 
10. 
10. 
10. 
11. 

4. 

9. 



May 



10. 

June 10. 

July 1. 

1. 

1. 

10. 

10. 

11. 

Aujr. 10. 



Sept, 



7. 

7. 

7. 

7. 

7. 

7. 

7. 

7. 

7. 
10. 
30. 
30. 
30. 
30. 
30. 
30. 



I'M! I. 



Oct. 



21. 
2-4. 
25. 
25. 
25. 
25. 
25. 



Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, 
Quinsigamond National Bank, dividend, . 
Worcester Trust Company, dividend, 
Fitchburg Railroad, dividend, .... 
New London Northern Railroad, dividend, 

Interest on deposit, 

First National Bank, Dividend No. 2, in liquidation 
Chicago Junction and Union Stock Yards Company 

interest, 

Interest on deposit, 

Interest on deposit, 

Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, 
New London Northern Railroad, dividend, 
Worcester Trust Company, dividend, 
Fitchburg Railroad, dividend, .... 

Interest on deposit, 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy joint 4's, interest, 

Interest on deposit, 

Worcester Mechanics Savings Bank, dividend, 
People's Savings Bank, dividend, 
Worcester Five Cents Savings Bank, dividend, 
Worcester County Institution for Savings, dividend 
Amherst Savings Bank, dividend, . 
Franklin Savings Institution, dividend, . 
Worcester North Savings Institution, dividend, 
Ware Savings Bank, dividend, .... 
Fall River Five Cents Savings Bank, dividend, 

Interest on deposit, 

Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, 
New London Northern Railroad, dividend, 
Worcester Trust Company, dividend, 
Fitchburg Railroad, dividend, .... 
Quinsigamond National Bank, dividend, . 
Chicago Junction and Union Stock Yards Company 

interest, 



Total to balance, 



Ck. 



A. S. Roc, three lectures, . 
Gospel services, 
Slides and condenser, 
C. A. Lakin, extra salary, 
Band Instruction, 
Redemption of token money, 
Prizes to cottagers, . 



Amount carried forward, 



$3,241 49 

286 00 

15 00 

6 00 

118 75 

22 50 

1 26 

250 00 

100 00 

1 53 

2 01 
357 50 

22 50 

6 00 

118 75 

1 81 
100 00 

2 36 
40 60 
55 72 
83 28 

63 70 

64 76 
54 94 
54 94 
61 00 
44 04 

2 19 

286 00 

22 50 

6 00 

118 75 

15 00 

100 00 



$5,676 88 


$30 00 


28 00 


7 23 


8 34 


10 00 


100 00 


7 00 



?190 57 



24 TREASURER'S REPORT TRUST FUNDS. [Oct. 



Union Stock Yards 



for boys, 



ase, 



$190 57 



Amount brought forward, 

Nov. 7. Prizes to cottagers, 

16. Band instruction, 

16. C. A. Lakin, extra salary, 

16. Books, 
29. Prizes to cottagers, 

Dec. 7. Prizes to cottagers, 

7. L. R. Adams, lecture, 

7. Redemption of token money, 
13. Band instruction, 
13. Prizes to cottagers, . 
29. Steel die, and medals, 
29. A. S. Roe, two lectures, . 
29. Redemption of token money, 
29. Band instruction, 

1905. 

Jan. 11. Stereopticon lecture, 

17. Prizes to cottagers, . 
17. 20 medals, .... 
17. Gospel services, 
17. Christmas celebration, 
23. $1,000 Chicago Junction and 

Company 4's, . 

23. 1 share Fitchburg Railroad, 

25. 2 shares Fitchburg Railroad, 

28. Tuition at Mt. Hermon School 

Feb. 8. Band instruction, 

8. Prizes to cottagers, . 
8. Redemption of token money, 
8. Entertainments, 

Mar. 2. Ribbon for badges, . 

2. Prizes to cottagers, . 

2. Expenses of trip of honor boys 

2. A. S. Roe, lecture, 
16. Band instruction, 
16. Prizes to cottagers, . 

April 12. Redemption of token money, 

12. Band instruction, 

12. Entertainment, . 

12. Peter MacQueen, lecture, . 

12. Gospel services, 

25. Charles L. Gates, re Westborough land purch 

25. Worcester Safe Deposit Vaults, box rent, 

May 3. Band instruction, 

3. Prizes to cottagers, 

3. Medals, 



Amount carried forward, f 2,759 01 



3 00 


25 00 


8 33 


225 47 


3 00 


8 00 


10 00 


100 00 


25 00 


3 00 


43 00 


20 00 


100 00 


25 00 


10 00 


• 3 00 


12 00 


26 00 


90 87 


1,013 69 


144 13 


290 25 


55 00 


25 00 


3 00 


100 00 


10 00 


3 00 


6 00 


6 50 


10 00 


25 00 


8 00 


100 00 


25 00 


10 00 


10 00 


26 00 


6 20 


5 00 


25 00 


3 00 


18 00 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



25 



Amount brought forward, . 



May 3. 

3. 

8. 
June 5. 

5. 

5. 
14. 
14. 
14. 
14. 
14. 
July 12. 
12. 
12. 
12. 
12. 
12. 
20. 
Aug. 2. 
31. 
31. 
31. 
31. 
Sept. 12. 
12. 
12. 
30. 
30. 
30. 
30. 
30. 



190J. 

Oct. 1. 
20. 

1905. 

.Jan. 10. 
Apr. 
July 
Sept 



10. 

1. 



1905. 

Sept. 80. 



Expenses of outing of honor boys, 

Redemption of token money, . 

Prizes to cottagers, . 

Band instruction, 

Prizes to cottagers, . 

Expense of trip of honor boys, 

John A. Bowler, lecture, . 

A. S. Roe, three lectures, . 

Redemption of token money, . 

Prizes to cottagers, . 

Expense of honor boys, . 

July 4th celebration, 

Fireworks, .... 

Band instruction, 

Badges for honor boys, . 

Redemption of token money, . 

Prizes to cottagers, . 

Prizes to cottagers, . 

Band instruction, 

Gospel services, 

Prizes to cottagers, . 

Redemption of token money, . 

Expenses of honor boys home, 

Prizes to cottagers, . 

Band instruction, 

Badges for honor boys, 

Band instruction, 

Gospel services, 

Redemption of token money, . 

Expense of home trip of honor boy 

Balance forward, 

Grand total, 



Lyman School, Lamb Fund. 
Db. 

Balance brought forward, 

People's Savings Bank, dividend, 

Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, 

Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, 
Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend, 

People's Savings Bank, dividend, 

Boston & Albany Railroad, dividend. 



Total, 



$2,759 01 

5 18 

100 00 

5 00 

25 00 

14 00 

13 30 

10 00 

30 00 

100 00 

3 00 

21 65 

46 70 

72 61 

25 00 

16 50 

100 00 

5 00 

3 00 

25 00 

26 00 
9 00 

100 00 

12 25 

8 00 

25 00 

1 15 

25 00 

24 00 

100 00 

5 94 

1,860 59 

$5,676 88 



$151 


93 


54 


87 


13 


60 


12 


00 


16 


00 




41 


12 





Balance forward, 



Cr 



?3U 71 



$314 71 



26 TREASURER'S EEPORT TRUST FUNDS. [Oct, 



Industrial School, Lamb Fund. 

1904. Dr. 

Oct. 1. Balance brought forward, $5 93 

20. People's Savings Bank, dividend, .... 6 06 

1905. 

Jan. 3. American Telephone and Telegraph Company, in- 
terest, 20 00 

July 11. American Telephone and Telegraph Company, in- 
terest, 20 00 

Sept. 1. People's Savings Bank, dividend, .... 423 

Total, ......... $56 22 

1904. CR. 

Dec. 14. Christmas celebration, $50 00 

Sept. 30. Balance forward, 6 22 

Total, 856 22 

Industrial School, Fay Fund. 

1904. Dr. 

Oct. 20. Worcester Mechanics Savings Bank, dividend, . $20 00 

1905. 

Sept. 7. Worcester Mechanics Savings Bank, dividend, . 40 20 

30. Worcester Mechanics Savings Bank, ... 25 00 

Total, $85 20 

1905. CK. 

Jan. 10. Prizes, §60 00 

July 7. July 4th celebration, 25 00 

Sept. 30. Balance forward, 20 

Total, f 85 20 

Lyman and Industrial Schools Investments, Sept. 30, 1905. 
Lyman School, Lyman Fund, 

Bonds : — Par Value. Market Value. 

$5,000 Chicago Junction and Union Stock Yards 

Company, $5,000 00 $5,300 00 

$5,000 Chicago, Burlington & Quincy joint 4's, . 5,000 00 5,050 00 

Stock : — 

143 shares Boston & Albany Railroad Company, 14,300 00 36,751 00 

95 shares Fitchburg Railroad, . . . . 9,500 00 13,490 00 

10 shares New London Northern Railroad, . 1,000 00 2,250 00 

5 shares Quinsigamond National Bank, . . 500 00 675 00 

4 shares Worcester Trust Company, . . 400 00 860 00 

Amounts carried forward, .... 835,70000 $64,37600 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



27 



Amounts brought forward , . 

10 shares Central National Bank, in liquidation, 
40 shares Citizens National Bank, in liquidation, 
10 shares First National Bank, in liquidation, . 

Savings banks : — 
Amherst Savings Bank, .... 
Fall River Savings Bank, .... 
Franklin Savings Institution, 
People's Savings Bank,- .... 

Ware Savings Bank 

Worcester County Institution for Savings, 
Worcester Five Cents Savings Bank, 
Worcester Mechanics Savings Bank, . 
Worcester North Savings Institution, 
Worcester National Bank, balance, . 



$35,700 00 164,376 00 



Totals, 



1,000 00 


- 


4,000 00 


- 


1,000 00 


400 00 


1,603 32 


1,603 32 


1,090 41 


1,090 41 


1,360 78 


1,360 78 


1,472 94 


1,472 94 


1,510 66 


1,510 66 


1,590 56 


1,590 56 


947 20 


947 20 


1,010 00 


1,010 00 


1,360 78 


1,360 78 


1,860 59 


1,860 59 



$55,507 24 $78,583 24 



Lyman School, Lamb Fund. 

6 shares Boston and Albany Railroad Company, $600 00 

People's Savings Bank, 1,464 49 

Worcester National Bank, balance, . . . 314 71 



Totals, 



$1,542 00 

1,464 49 

314 71 



$2,379 20 $3,321 20 



Industrial School, Lamb Fund. 
$1,000 American Telegraph and Telephone 

Company, 

People's Savings Bank, .... 
Worcester National Bank, balance, . 



Totals, 



Industrial School, Rogers Fund 
|1,000 city of Quincy, 8J per cent., 1922, . 
Accrued interest, 



$ 1,000 00 


$960 


00 


112 02 


112 


02 


6 22 


6 


22 


$1,118 24 


$1,078 24 


nd} 

$1,000 00 


$1,000 


00 


141 01 


141 


04 



Totals, 



si, 141 04 $1,141 04 



Industrial School, Fay Fund. 

Worcester Mechanics Savings Bank, . . . 175 00 

Worcester National Bank, balance, ... 20 



Totals, 



Examined ami approved : M. H. Walker, 



$975 00 
20 



$975 20 $975 20 

C. G. WASHBUKN, 

Treasurer. 



George H. Carleton, 



Auditors. 



Custody of State Treasurer. 



Appendix A 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS 



WESTBOROUGH. 



1904-1905 



SUPERINTENDENT'S EEPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

The "usual tables of statistics showing the condition and changes 
in Lyman School for Boys for 1904-1905 are herewith respectfully 
submitted. 

The average number of pupils has been 336, — an increase of 
nearly 6 per cent, over the average of the preceding year. The fact 
that there has been all the time a full complement of boys for one 
additional cottage, and some of the time for two, has been a serious 
handicap. An inspection of Table No. 10, page 58, shows that the 
number of new commitments has grown nearly 50 per cent, in ten 
years. During that time only one cottage has been built, to fill 
partially a want already existing. The pressure has been increasing 
year by year, and I hardly see how the inevitable growth of the 
coming year can be decently met, pending the construction of addi- 
tional dormitories, should the Legislature see fit to vote an appro- 
priation for the same. 

Ali departments of the school have moved forward with a good 
degree of vigor, and the work accomplished has seemed to com- 
mend the earnestness and efficiency of my co-workers. One of my 
assistants, fresh from public school work, thinks he finds a much 
more earnest and self-sacrificing spirit here than among the public 
school teachers. 

There have been some changes in my corps of assistants. Two 
have been removed by death. James W. Clark, for forty years engi- 
neer and master mechanic, died December last. In him the institu- 
tion lost one of the most efficient and loyal workers it ever had. 
Mrs. Cora Carey, who had clone excellent service in charge of the 
laundry, passed away in August. So much of the success of a 
school like this depends upon the staunch character of the officers 
in charge, thai it seems fitting to honor the memory of these who 
died in the harness by a mention of their devotion. 

The supervising principal, Mr. J. A. Puffer, terminated his 
vice September 30, and is succeeded by Mr. William G. Siddell. 
Mr. Puffer leaves the work in so good a condition that ii is hoped 
his successor may carry it forward with even greater success. 



32 SUPT.'S REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

The school program has been so arranged that boys of the lower 
grades attend in the morning from 8 to 11.30 o'clock, and the 
older and more advanced from 1 to 4.30 o'clock in the afternoon, 
while all go from 7 to 8 o'clock in the evening. Pupils returned for 
a second term in the school, if over sixteen years of age and fairly 
well advanced in their studies, also boys of equal age and advance- 
ment who have been here two years or more without winning a pro- 
bationary release, have only one hour of evening school. It is 
believed that acquiring a habit of work is an even more needful 
part of education of these older boys than book knowledge. 

The elementary manual training classes have become too large 
for two teachers to instruct, and an additional class has been organ- 
ized under the teacher of drawing and carving, who is also trained 
for the teaching of woodwork. In the advanced and elementary 
manual training 125 pupils are under daily tuition. No other 
training excites so deep and general interest. 

The carpentry class has done valuable training work, as well as 
produced very creditable articles of furniture, and its graduates 
have rarely failed to make their way successfully upon release. 

The class in printing has had its full complement of 16 pupils 
throughout the year, and has done unusually good work in prepara- 
tion of its pupils for practical printing. The majority of the boys 
who have had the training have upon release found opportunity to 
practise their art. 

The classes in agriculture have been provocative of much interest 
and enthusiasm, and will continue to be made a prominent feature 
of the school work. The boys' gardens are of direct practical value 
in arousing an intelligent interest in plants and the successful culti- 
vation of them, which will make many a boy long for a little spot 
of ground to cultivate when he has won his release. 

As an extension of our agricultural training, butter-making has 
been added to our dairying plant. About 20 boys are all the time 
in training as milkers and grooms for the cows ; 6 others are in the 
creamery. The butter produced is of first quality, and is given to 
the boys at two of their meals daily. The care of the stock seems 
to exert a very humanizing effect upon the boys, calling forth kindli- 
ness and thoughtfulness in a marked degree. 

The industrial training which comes through the general kitchen, 
the bakery, the steam laundry, and even the domestic work, while 
hardly to be reckoned as trades teaching, has a concrete value in 
preparing boys to become bread-winners and home-makers later 
in life. 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 33 

Over 40 boys received daily instruction in the brass band. Their 
progress was such that on Memorial Day they marched and played 
several hours for the G. A. E. Posts of Westborough and North- 
borough, winning enthusiastic praise in both places. 

Gymnastic and military drill have been continued throughout the 
year. The play element has had a conspicuous place in the program, 
especially for the younger boys. First physical measurements were 
made of 401 boys; second measurements of 157; 17 were treated in 
a corrective class, 5 of these, having been brought up to standard, 
were discharged. The things for which they received the special 
treatment were curvature, pronated feet, stiff knee and general 
weakness. In out-of-doors sports and contests a commendable de- 
gree of enthusiasm and skill has been shown. 

A beginning has been made in the classification of the backward 
and feeble-minded. Dr. Jelly's aid in this work is invaluable. The 
work for such boys in mental and manual instruction should be so 
conducted as to clearly demonstrate who are really so feeble-minded 
as to demand custodial care, and who with painstaking education 
can be prepared for life in the open community. Work of this 
character is an important function of such a school as this ; and up 
to the present, so far as I know, very little intelligent systematic 
effort has been put forth in this direction by any corrective institu- 
tions. 

Among the devices which have been used this year to stimulate 
good effort has been the so-called " Honor Class." It has no direct 
bearing upon speedy release. Any boy may become a candidate for 
it by declaring his intention of so doing. At the end of two months 
of effort his name is considered before the officers and teachers, and 
if his conduct is judged fitting, he is admitted to the class and has 
the privilege of wearing a decoration, consisting of a bronze medal- 
linn of the knight Sir Galahad, attached to a red ribbon. If his 
conduct is correct for two months longer, he wears his medallion 
on a red and blue ribbon. He now has certain privileges not ac- 
corded to other pupils. If his conduct continues to be satisfactory 
two months longer, he may wear the bronze token over a red, white 
and blue ribbon. This gives additional privileges, among which is 
that of visiting his home. 

This device has seemed to work well thus far. The object is, of 
course, to secure the co-operation of the boy's will in the right 
direction. It may seem like a bribe; but if it induces a boy to strive 
honestly for even two months, ii has served a useful end. It may 
be a crude motive, but it is a motive suited to the age nnd develop- 



34 SUPT.'S KEPOKT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

ment of the pupil. It has induced 108 boys to make a successful 
struggle, and has exerted a perceptible and salutary effect upon the 
whole school. 

In the same line is a prize to the boys of any cottage having a 
three-months clean record for no runaways. This is called the 
" Loyalty Prize." It is no unusual thing for a cottage to be six 
months or a year or more without a runaway. The number of run- 
aways within the last two years, however, has been annoyingly large, 
about one in eight of those passing through the school having made 
a more or less successful attempt at escape, although very few are 
successful in staying out long. 

What is the significance of these runaways? Are they a sign of 
disorganization, or weak discipline? The boy comes to the school 
against his will, and is to be kept at all hazards. Adequate physical 
restraints would seem the logical sequence of the legal requirement 
to keep and discipline. Diametrically opposed to physical restraint 
is the aim to give each boy an education in liberty and its proper use. 
In so far as the running away is made physically difficult, the cir- 
cumstances become characteristic of a prison, the conditions ab- 
normal, and in an important degree the exercise of all volition and 
habit by the pupil unnatural. The tendency of such physical re- 
straint is to induce a frame of mind wholly repugnant to life in the 
open community. To minimize unnatural restraint, to make the 
bo}^ see that he cannot escape obedience to law by becoming a tramp, 
is worth a great deal of trouble and many attempted runaways. 

In an institution where it is the settled purpose and effort to 
return its charges to the open community as soon as consistent with 
good discipline, there are bound to be many returned to the institu- 
tion for further instruction and discipline. There are also always a 
few whose peculiarities of disposition will prolong their detention. 
Some of these would be benefited and prepared for a life work if the 
instruction in trades were more extended and varied than at present. 
Carpentry and printing are effectively taught. Brick and stone 
laying, painting and plumbing would be a valuable addition to 
present facilities. 

The dentist, Dr. Brigham, by reason of near-by residence and 
the frequency of his visits, has made a decided improvement in the 
attitude of the boys toward the care of their teeth. The best of 
dentistry will, however, fail of much permanent good without the 
hearty co-operation which the cottage masters give. 

The work on the subway, for which a special appropriation was 
given, has progressed so that the walls and roof are nearly com- 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 35 

pleted. The piping is about ready to be made up and erected. 
Owing to the advance in the price of cement, there is some question 
whether the work can be completed inside the amount appropriated. 
The work of construction is all being done by the boys, the con- 
creting under the direction of Mr. Backus, master of Oak cottage, 
the piping under the direction of the head engineer, Mr. Irving 
Nourse. 

The amount paid out for current expenses during the past three 
years has remained about the same for each year, notwithstand- 
ing a substantial increase in the cost of living, and an increase 
during that time of nearly 9 per cent, in the average number of 
pupils to be provided for. If we steer clear of a deficiency during 
the remainder of the fiscal year, it will be by depleting the stock 
of supplies usually kept on hand, and postponing repairs and im- 
provements which should be made. Some of these betterments, 
although singly not large matters, should, I think, be done by a 
special appropriation, rather than be added to the current per capita 
expense. 

The first of these betterments is an officers' bath room at the 
Berlin farmhouse. There is none now, and so evident a need should 
no longer be neglected. 

The second is a dough mixer at the bakery, which would soon pay 
for itself in saving of flour and improvement in the uniformity of 
the bread. 

For the third there should be showers installed in the gymnasium 
bath room. Gymnastic drill cannot be carried on properly without 
some facilities in this direction. 

It would also be an economy to extend the subway for steam pipe 
from the bakery building to the school building about one hundred 
feet. If this were done, the steam could be supplied from the 
power station to heat the school building during all except the 
winter weather, and that without additional boiler capacity. The 
saving of coal and the more judicious firing because of better super- 
vision would fully justify the expense of additional conduit and 
piping. 

The cost of the four items above named would probably not 
reach $2,500. 

The amount of land owned by the institution is wholly inadequate 
to supply the products needed. At present over two hundred acres 
are hired. Is it as good policy to rent land as to own it? 

I wish to reiterate the crying need of another cottage, and if it 
could be located so as to separate the older returned boys from the 



36 SUPT.'S REPOKT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

rest of the school, it would be of advantage to the boys and to the 
discipline of the school. 

Notwithstanding all that has been achieved, the work bristles 
with problems difficult of solution, but not so discouraging but that 
we face the future hopefully. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

THEODORE F. CHAPIN, 

Superintendent. 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 37 



KEPOKT OF THE MANAGER OF THE 
BERLIN FARMHOUSE. 



To the Superintendent of the Lyman School for Boys. 

With this, the tenth annual report of the Berlin farm school, one 
is inclined to review the work of the ten years, to discover, so far 
as possible, whether or not it has counted for all it should toward 
accomplishing the desired result. 

There are 404 names on the list of boys committed, the majority 
of whom have been retained as suited to conditions existing here. 
Among the list are many that thus far have proved a disappoint- 
ment, yet few indeed that have not in some measure responded to 
the influences surrounding them, and a large number whose changed 
lives give encouragement to all concerned in their training and 
teaching. One important lesson has been learned, namely, not to 
judge by appearances; for the best results are often found where 
least expected. There is in mind a slow, reticent, rather unattrac- 
tive boy, a member of the school for only a few months, whose career 
when leaving seemed doubtful; yet in June last, three years from 
that time, an exceptionally well-written letter was received, making 
kindly inquiry for each member of the family, remembering also 
the horse he cared for while here, and expressing his thankfulness 
that " some one had thought to establish such a school for such 
boys as he." Another letter, showing that the nature work begun 
here had not been forgotten, was lately received. K. wrote : " The 
bird game has been a great help as well as pleasure to me in learn- 
ing the names of the birds I saw; it makes me feel quite happy 
when I can come home and say that I have discovered a new bird." 

If not out of place, I wish here to testify to the inspiration gained 
in a recent conversation with the superintendent, who, after so 
many years of labor with all sorts of boys, still showed the same 
kindly interest and faith in each individual case that he has ever 
done, guarding carefully the boys 7 rights as wards of the State; 
thus refuting the charge often made, that any one long accustomed 
to deal with the delinquent child becomes callous to his needs or 
even to his just deserts. 



38 FARMHOUSE REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

At times boys have been placed to board when they have been 
here but a few weeks ; and it has been questioned, " Why were they 
sent here, if they need to stay so short a time ? " This can only be 
answered by the statement that, while every effort is made to keep 
this a model home, yet new boys are constantly coming, often very 
bad ones, whose words and deeds recall to the minds of others that 
which has been partially forgotten or replaced by ideas more 
worthy. Now, when a child has shown himself so far reformed as 
to appear willing and anxious to do right, it seems advisable to 
place him in a good home, where his companions are limited in 
number, and are supposedly those that will help in the reformation 
already begun. 

Reformation may seem too harsh a term to apply to these chil- 
dren, yet much has been developed in their characters that must be 
reformed before they can be anything but a menace to society if 
unrestrained. Even a child of seven years came to the school so 
utterly undisciplined as to require personal restraint while in his 
paroxysms of rage, which appeared at the least hint of command 
or guidance. He came from a large city, and, according to even 
his father's statement, had lived in defiance of all control, having 
stayed from home five nights in succession at one time. Now, after 
three months' kindly, judicious discipline, he is a happy, healthy, 
contented and generally obedient boy. Unlike many another, he 
was uncommonly bright and shrewd, and only needed the matter 
plainly set before him to realize that "law is better than license." 

The visiting day picnics have been, as ever, a source of great 
enjoyment to the boys as well as to their families. No reward is 
more appreciated than permission to meet the mother and her little 
ones at the railroad station half a mile away, and no punishment 
is more deeply felt than the withdrawal of such permission. This 
happened to a boy last month for deceit and falsehood. 

The benefit arising from these visits is not all on the side of the 
boys. A better knowledge of home conditions is gained by watching 
this unrestricted intercourse of parent and child than could be 
learned by an inspection of the home after the boy has left. One is 
enabled to deal more intelligently with the child, for many things 
are explained. Even D.'s nervousness and dyspeptic stomach trou- 
bles were better understood after his fond mother had confidentially 
requested permission to " sind up a bit of tay, so the bye could have 
a cup now and then. He do be missin' it so." This matter of tea 
is found to be serious with many boys. One wrote to his grand- 
mother, " Oh, I miss my tea; I cry and cry and cry, but it ain't no 
youse." 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 39 

Fifty boys have been committed to the Berlin School this year, — ■ 
a larger number than during any previous year. One was within a 
few weeks returned to Westborough, and another after several 
months' trial. One was allowed to go home, and 43 have been placed 
at board in private families. Several of these were placed with 
grave fears that they would be returned (as they were) to the school. 
The tendency to dishonesty was such a marked characteristic in 
them that it was doubtful if they could or would resist temptation 
when released from school supervision. 

The average time of detention was nearly five months, — a trifle 
less than last year. The school now numbers 22. Only one has 
been here over five months. 

Thanks are due to the trustee who keeps in such close touch with 
this branch of the school. Her visits are eagerly anticipated by all, 
the faithful boy being proud to show his good record, and even the 
bad boy sure of her sympathy and encouragement for the future. 
To her helpful advice, as well as to the superintendent's confidence 
and trust, is due much of the success of the ten years' work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EMILY L. WARNER. 



40 VISITATION REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 



EEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF 
LYMAN SCHOOL PROBATIONERS. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

Herewith is respectfully presented a brief summary of the work 
of the visiting department for the year 1904-1905. 

The total number of individuals on the visiting list for the year 

ending Sept. 30, 1905, was , 1,073 

Becoming of age during the year, ...... 139 

Died, 5 

Discharged : — 

As an unfit subject, 1 

In insane asylum, 1 

In epileptic hospital, . .1 

— 3 
Returned to the school and not relocated : — 

For serious fault, "". . .25 

Not serious, 39 

— 64 
Total number passing out of our care during the year, . . — 211 

On the visiting list Oct. 1, 1935, 862 

Adding to the above number : — 
Transferred to the Massachusetts Reformatory: ] — 

This year, 22 

Previously, . . . 33 

Runaways from the school : — 

Having been returned from probation, 20 

Never having been on probation, 15 

— 90 

Total number under twenty-one outside the school, .... 952 

1 The mittimus is sent to the reformatory with hoys so transferred, and techni- 
cally they no longer belong to the Lyman School. They are, however, included 
among Lyman School boys under twenty-one in the table on page 52. 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



41 



Classification of Visiting List. 
Of the 862 boys on the visiting list, 44 (not including those in 
the foreign service of the United States government) are classed as 
out of the State and employment unknown, and 56 are on the 
unknown list. The occupations of the remaining 762 boys, with 
the number engaged in each employment, are shown in the follow- 
ing table : — 



Army, United States, 


. 12 


Express team, . 




Assisting parents, 


. 8 


Farmers, . 




At board and attending school, 


. 47 


Fisherman, 




Attending school, 


. 25 


Florist, 




Baker, .... 


. 6 


Glass factory, 




Barber, .... 


. 1 


Guide, 




Bell boy 


1 


Hat shop, . 




Bicycle shop, 


1 


Idle, .... 




Blacksmith, 


4 


Invalids, 




Bleaehery, .... 


2 


Iron works, 




Book binder, 


1 


Jewelry shop, . 




Bookkeeper, 


1 


Laborer, . 




Bootblack, .... 


1 


Leather factory, 




Bos factory, 


4 


Lithographer, 




Brick yard, 


2 


Lumber yard, . 




Brash factory, . 


1 


Machinist, . 




Button shop, 


1 


Market, . 




Canning factory, 


2 


Massachusetts Reform ator 


' i • 


Carpenter, .... 


11 


Milk wagon, 




Cartridge factory, 


1 


Mill (textile), . 




Chocolate factory, 


1 


Mo tor man, 




Clerk 


20 


Navy, United states, . 




( loach man, . 


2 


( Occupation unknown, 




Comb factory, . 


S 


Other public institutions, , 




Conductor, 




Painter, . 




Corcmaker, 




Paper mill, 




Cork shop, .... 




Peddler, . 




Cutlery shop, 




Piano shop, 




Electrical works, 


10 


Plumber, . . . . 




Elevator boy, 




Porter, . 




Emb aimer, . 




Printer, . 




Envelope factory, 




Recently released, occup 


ition 


Errand boy, . 


17 


unknown, 





1 1 



42 VISITATION REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL 



Railroad hand, . 


6 


Shirt factory, 


Restaurant, 


8 


Stock boy, . 


Rope factory, 


3 


Tailor, 


Rubber works, . 


5 


Tannery, . 


Sailor, .... 





Teamster and driv 


Sawmill, .... 


2 


Theatre company, 


Shoe shop, .... 


32 


Toy shop, . 


Silver plating factory, 


1 


Waiter, 


Skate shop, 


1 


Wire mill, . 


Shipper, .... 


7 





[Oct. 



l 
l 
l 

4 

33 
1 
3 
1 

7 



Reduced to approximate percentages, this table will show: 



In United States army and navy, about 

At board, 

Employed on farms, .... 

In mills (textile), about 

Classed as laborers, .... 

Massachusetts Reformatory at Concord, 1 

In other public institutions, about 

In 77 different occupations, about 



Per Cent. 

7 

6 
18 

7 

2 

5 

2 
53 



The report cards of the above-mentioned 762 boys show that at 
the time of the last report 645, or 85 per cent., were doing well; 62, 
or 8 per cent., doubtfully; and 57, or 7 per cent., badly. 

An analysis of the unknown list shows that 

29 disappeared this year. 
27 disappeared previously. 

And, again, that of this number 



24 left place with a farmer. 

12 left home or relatives. 

20 not located, family having moved. 



1 Boys transferred to the Massachusetts Reformatory and runaways from the 
school are not included above, their names not being upon the visiting list ; but 
they are counted in the tables given on pages 52-54. 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18, 



43 



The following figures give the placings, returns, visits and collec- 
tions of wages for two years : — 





1905. 


1904. 


Placings. 

Number of boys placed in their homes when leav- 
ing the school, 

Number of boys placed with others when leaving 
the school, 

Number of boys boarded out when leaving the 
school, 


142 
88 
49 


114 
73 
44 


Total number placed out within the year and 
becoming subjects of visitation, 


279 


231 


Returns. 
Number of boys within the year returned to the 
school : — 
For serious fault, 


25 


30 


For relocation and other purposes, 


89 


70 


Total returned, 


114 


100 


Visits. 
Number of visits to probationers, .... 


2,319 


2,127 


Number of visits to boys over eighteen years of age, 


1,102 


1,081 


Number of boys over eighteen years of age visited, 


582 


461 


Average visits to boys over eighteen 3 T ears of age, . 


1.9 


2.3 


Number of visits to boys under eighteen years of age, 


1,217 


1,046 


Number of boys under eighteen years of age visited, 


491 


576 


Average visits to boys under eighteen years of age, 


2.4 


1.8 


Number of homes investigated and reported upon, 
in writing, 

Number of new places investigated and reported 
upon, 


271 
33 


287 
25 


Collections. 

Amount of money collected and paid over to the 
Lyman School as wages of boys and placed to 
their credit, 

Number of boys in behalf of whom money was col- 
lected, 


f2,268 66 
70 


$2,396 87 
64 



44 VISITATION EEPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 



One hundred and thirty-nine boys whose names are upon the 
visiting list have become of age during the year. The following 
table shows their occupation and standing : — 



Army, 
Bookkeeper, 
Bottling works, 
Carpenter, . 
Clerk, 








8 
1 
2 
1 
6 


Collar shop, 
Conductor, . 








1 

1 


Cigar maker, 
Drummer, . 








1 

2 


Electrician, 








2 


Engraver, . 
Farmer, 








1 
7 


Fisherman, 








1 


Florist, 








1 


Glass factory, 
Hostler, 








1 
1 


Idle, . 
Invalid, 








1 
1 


Insane asylum, 
Knife factory, 
Laborer, 








1 
1 

6 



Lamp factory, 


. 1 


Laundry, . 


1 


Loom fixer, 


.2 


Machinist, . 


. 2 


Massachusetts R 


eformatory, . 7 


Mill (textile), 


. 7 


Navy, , 


. 8 


Occupation unkr 


Lown, . . 1 


Other institution 


s, . . .4 


Out of State, 


. 12 


Painter, 


. 2 


Plumber, . 


. 5 


Porter, 


. 1 


Printer, 


. 2 


Restaurant, 


. 1 


Shoe shop, . 


. 9 


Stone mason, 


. 1 


Stove maker, 


. 1 


Teamster, . 


. 9 


Unknown, . 


. 16 



The above table, expressed in percentages, shows : — 

United States army and navy, about . 

Employed on farms, about 

In other penal institutions (including the Massachusetts 

Reformatory), 

Employed in textile mills, 



Per Cent. 
11 



The remaining 69 per cent, is divided among 36 different occu- 
pations. 

By our usual classification of boys in the visiting department 
becoming twenty-one years of age, 94, or 68 per cent., are doing 
well without question; 5, or 4 per cent., not so well, but honestly 
self-supporting; 12, or 8 per cent., badly, 11 of them in penal 
institutions; 16, or 12 per cent., whereabouts unknown; 12, or 8 
per cent., out of State. 

The following table 1 compares the conduct of boys coming of 



1 The table includes all who have ever been on probation, thus counting in with 
the 139 in the care of the visiting department within the year 5 others in former 
years dropped from this list, 4 of them having been transferred to Concord and 1 
returned to the school, from which he ran away. 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



45 



age within the year who had been placed out on farms with those 
who went back to their own people : — 



Standing. 



Of 48 Boys placed on 
Farms. 



Of 96 Boys released 

to their 
Parents or Relatives. 



Doing well without question, 
Not so well, but self-supporting, 
Unknown, .... 
Badly 



36, or 75 per cent. 

2, or 4 
7, or 15 

3, or 6 



66, or 69 per cent. 
6, or 6 
11, or 12 
13, or 13 



The above table shows to the advantage of the boys who went 
to farm homes, 75 per cent, of the farm, boys doing excellently, as 
against 69 per cent, of those released to parents. 

Again, of the 48 boys who were sent to farms : — 

8 are now doing well on farms, earning good wages. 
22 are doing well in their city homes. 
5 are in the army and navy. 

2 were returned to the school and transferred to the Massachusetts 

Reformatory. 
8 are either unknown or are doing badly. 

3 are out of the State. 



One hundred and twelve of the 139 boys on the visiting list 
becoming twenty-one years of age were never returned to the school 
for a second term. 

As usual, we have met in weekly conference, and monthly with 
the probation committee of your board; and, as last year, we have 
received the addresses of the parents of all boys committed to the 
Lyman School, at the time of their commitment, and, as far as 
possible, we have seen such homes and reported upon them. We 
have written less letters to groups of boys than last year, but our 
individual correspondence has been larger. In introducing a few 
of these letters, it may be said that they were taken from the files 
almost at random. 

The following letter was received from a young boy who had 
spent a few months in the Berlin branch of the Lyman School and 
had been placed in a farmer's family outside. This boy's own home 
was impossible on account of the intemperate habits of the parents. 



46 VISITATION REPOET LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

Dear Mr. Wheeler : — I thought I would write a few lines to you. 
TVe are chopping wood now and I like it very much. It was snowing to- 
day, so I thought I would write to you. "We had two weeks' vacation and 
school will begin on January 4th. I am in the fifth grade and I am learn- 
ing fast. 



The above boy remained in this place until he was fourteen years 
of age, attending school regularly. He was then removed to a place 
where he could earn his living. Four months later, his teacher, 
who had become very much interested in him, found him a position 
with a manufacturing company, where he could work during the 
day and attend evening school, the teacher herself assuming the 
responsibility for the boy's care. 

A boy of sixteen writes as follows : — 

March 20, 1905. 

Dear Sir : — I write these few lines hoping to find you well as I am at 
present. I received your letter and was very glad to hear from you. I am 
living with my mother and have been working steady for over a year, and 
I go to high school at night, and the best of all is I do not drink any intoxi- 
cating liquor which most boys of my age do, and I am proud to say I do 
not. I took the pledge and mean to keep it. I hope you will excuse me 
for not writing before as it is something I verv seldom do. Please excuse 
this writing for I am very sleepy as my mother forgot to give me the letter 
before I went to bed. 

Tours truly, 

"With, the exception of the first year since the visiting and care 
of the Lyman School probationers was given to this department, 
we have seldom been obliged to seek homes for our boys: generally 
more applications for boys are on file at the office than can be filled 
at any one time. The demand for our boys is a natural one, and 
generally arises in the following manner : A., in some way or other, 
hears of boys being placed from the Lyman School, and corresponds 
in regard to the matter. The place having been investigated and 
approved, a boy is placed with him. If that boy proves to be a 
desirable boy, capable, faithful and well-disposed, it is not long 
before other parties in A.'s neighborhood begin to inquire about 
boys. In this way colonies of boys are formed in that particular 
neighborhood. Again, A. has a relative living in a different locality, 
who hears of the success that he (A.) is having with his boy, and 
correspondence begins with this relative, with a like result. From 
an application of a party in the State of Maine we have sent boys 
to several parties in Xew Hampshire and in other parts of Maine, 
far remote. We seek, in placing a boy, not a place only, but a 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 18. 47 

home. In the case of our smaller boys this is imperative, and there 
can be no success without it. The young boy must be encouraged, 
sympathized with, sometimes petted and mothered, or else his boy- 
hood will forever lack what a home only can give. 

Many people, in whom it seems to the visitors that this kindly 
spirit is lacking, apply for boys. Such people never receive young 
boys if the visitor understands the conditions. All this is aside 
from the always prominent question as to the character of the 
people and their habits. If we know it, we never place a boy of 
any age with a person of intemperate habits, nor with a man whose 
greed for gain makes him unmindful of a boy's rights and of the 
work suitable for the boy. Boys seventeen years of age, or over, 
are in a different class from boys of twelve to sixteen. These older 
boys are working for wages, and their relation to their employer is 
somewhat in the nature of a hired man. They, however, require 
watching and guiding; and persons taking older boys are held in a 
large degree responsible for their behavior. So much depends upon 
the temperament and the attitude of the party taking the boy, as 
well as the disposition of the boy himself, that placing a boy in a 
home, instead of being a very simple matter, is one exceedingly 
complex. 

The following histories are illustrative of niches in homes into 
which the boys exactly fitted: — 

At the age of fourteen years, G. was committed to the Lyman 
School for the offence of breaking and entering. He had about the 
usual history at the school, and remained one year and six months. 
His home was respectable, and his relatives were anxious that he 
should do well. ITc was released on probation to his parents, where 
he did well for a short time, but soon fell into bad company; and 
at the age of seventeen and a half years, upon the request of his 
parents, he was returned to the school, needing hospital treatment 
and pretty thoroughly demoralized. 

Aiter a Beeond stay of six months in the Lyman School, G., now 

eighteeu years of age, was placed with a prosperous farmer in our 

State. The place was one well known to the visitor. The 

farmer needed a largi .-. capable hoy. and was willing to pay 

what such a boy was worth. The boy, now thoroughly convinced 
that he could not do well in the city, was anxious to go to this 
place. Result: after a year's stay, the boy (now in his twentieth 
year) is working for this Bame farmer, at good wages per month, the 
larger part of which he is Baving. The fanner reports to the visitor 
that of all the boys he has had from the Lyman School (and ho has 
had several) this young man gives the best satisfaction in every way. 



18 VISITATION REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

Another boy, committed to the Lyman School at the age of four- 
teen, after giving the police much trouble, spent one year and eight 
months in the school. When about sixteen years of age he was 
placed on a farm in a neighboring State. The farmer was a young 
man, and a friendship at once sprang up between the boy and his 
employer. The boy fitted the place exactly, antl he became almost 
indispensable to his employer, who trusted him, gave him work and 
responsibility, and, recognizing his worth, rewarded him with a 
much larger compensation than is usual for boys of his age. With 
reports uniformly good, he stayed in his place until he was eighteen 
years of age, and had over $100 to his credit in the bank. He was 
allowed to go to visit his father, and to stay with him if he wished ; 
but not finding suitable work, and his home being a very poor one 
from all points of view, he returned to his former locality of his 
own volition, and here he has. remained, working for himself in the 
neighborhood until the present time. To-day he is a strong, healthy, 
self-respecting young man of twenty, of good habits, and thoroughly 
appreciative of what the State has done for him. 

I have introduced these last two histories to elucidate one point 
only, viz., that to develop- the best in any boy he must feel that he 
holds a particular and in a degree responsible place in the home 
and its daily round of duties, that he fills what would be without 
him a real vacancy. The normal boy who is so placed and appre- 
ciated seldom runs away. 

The year just past has been one of harmonious work, and the 
relations of the department of visitation to the superintendent and 
the officers of the Lyman School have been uniformly pleasant, and, 
it is to be hoped, mutually helpful. 

Financial Statement, 1905. 
Expended for : — 

Salaries of visitors, $4,874 96 

Office furniture, 11 30 

Office assistance, 253 61 

Telephone service, 84 99 

Travelling expenses, 3,696 17 

Stationery and postage, . 84 65 

$9,005 68 
Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER A. WHEELER, 
Superintendent of Lyman School Probationers. 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 49 



PHYSICIAN'S RBPOET. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman School for Boys. 

I respectfully submit the physician's report for the year ending 
Sept. 30, 1905. 

Two hundred and twelve patients have been admitted to the 
hospital; 1,139 cases treated as out-patients; acute colds and minor 
accidents have, as usual, contributed largely to this list. 

To appreciate fully the amount of work done by the nurse in 
attendance, one must recall that the number of out-patients given 
counts but once each individual case. Many of these cases come to 
the hospital morning after morning, sometimes for weeks. During 
the year there have been an unusually large number of cases of 
rheumatism. Eight boys were confined to the hospital for a con- 
siderable time, 2 at least being seriously affected with accompanying 
heart disease. One of these boys was in the hospital almost con- 
tinuously for three months. Early in the year a boy was returned 
to the school sick with typhoid fever, from which he recovered after 
a period of two months. In April another boy was returned very 
sick with heart disease ; he died suddenly just a week later. During 
the winter there were 7 mild cases of chicken-pox, a severe case of 
erysipelas and one case of scarlet fever. This case developed early 
in January, before the new hospital had been occupied. It was at 
once opened and the boy taken to the contagions ward, where he 
and his nurse were isolated for eight weeks. The boys in his cot- 
tage were immediately quarantined, but fortunately no other case 
developed. One boy was sent to the Worcester City Hospital with 
appendicitis, where he was operated upon with fatal result. The 
case developed very rapidly during a severe attack of tonsilitis. 
Four cases of hernia were successfully operated upon at 1 1 1< * Ma— a- 
chusetts Genera] Bospital, and 1 boy was senl to the same hospital 
for removal of the tonsils. 

There have been but few serious accidents during the year. One 
boy caught his hand in a saw and very nearly losl his little fib 
It was saved, however, but with a stiff joint. A third hoy returned 



50 PHYSICIAN'S EEPOET LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

from outside came to the hospital with infection of the thigh just 
above the knee. An abscess formed, resulting in a large pus cavity, 
which healed very slowly. 

The new hospital was not permanently occupied until Sept. 12, 
1905. As yet the furnishings are rather meagre, but it is hoped it 
will soon be equipped with all that is necessary to make it most 
useful. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

T. H. AYEB. 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



51 



STATISTICS CONCEENING BOYS. 



Table No. 1. 



Number received and leaving the School during the Year ending Sept. 

30, 1905. 

Boys in the school Sept. 30, 1904, 343 

Received: — Committed, 191 

Returned from place, 82 

Returned "boarded-out" boys, .... 30 

Returned Berlin boys, not boarded out, . . 2 

Recommitted, 1 

Runaways recaptured, 24 

Returned from Eye and Ear Infirmary, . . 1 

Returned from Massachusetts General Hospital, . 2 



Whole number in school during the year, . 
Released: — On probation to parents, 

On probation to others, .... 

On probation, to attend school, 

Boarded out, 

Transferred to Massachusetts Reformatory, 

Runaways, 

Released to go out of country, 

Massachusetts School for Feeble-minded, 

Insane Hospital, 

Eye and Ear Infirmary,. 

Died, 

Massachusetts General Hospital, . 

Discharged, 

1! cturned to court over asre, . 



333 



676 1 



142 

88 

3 

49 

22 

24 2 

1 

6 

1 

1 

2 

5 

1 

1 



346 



Remaining in the school Sept. 80, 1906, 



330 



1 This represents 613 individuals. 

- There were 66 other runaways, who were brought hack so promptly that they 
were not recorded as absent from the institution. 



52 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 2. 

Monthly Admissions, Releases and Average Number of Inmates. 



MONTHS. 


Admitted. 


Released. 


Average No. 


October, 


35 


31 


343.38 


November, 














18 


29 


337.53 


December, 














27 


38 


334.35 


January, . 
February, 














25 
13 


15 
17 


333.74 
334.28 


March, 














25 


19 


334.22 


April, 

May, 

June, 














37 
33 

27 


34 

27 
27 


335.16 
343.12 
341.90 


July, 
August, . 
September, 














29 
32 
32 


49 
20 
40 


330.96 
335.16 
330.70 


Totals, 














333 


346 


336.21 



Table No. 3. 

A. Showing the Status of All Boys under Twenty-one whose Names 
were on the Books of the Lyman School Sept. 30, 1905. 

In the school, 330 

Temporarily in the Massachusetts General Hospital, ... 3 

Released from the school : — 

With parents, 443 

With others, . .85 

For themselves, 86 

At board, 47 

Sentenced to the Massachusetts Reformatory : — 

This year, 23 

Former years, 15 

38 

Transferred to Massachusetts Reformatory, . . . .55 
Sentenced to penal institutions other than Massachusetts 

Reformatory, 11 

Left the State, 44 

In the United States army, . . . . . . .12 

In the United States navy, . 40 

Lost sight of : — 

This year, 32 

Previously, 24 

56 

Runaways from the school, whereabouts unknown, . 26 
Runaways known to be in other institutions or navy, . 9 

35 

952 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



Table No. 3 — Continued. 
Discharged from the care of the school : — 
Returned to court as over age limit, . 

George Junior Republic, 

Discharged as unfit subject, to parents, . 

Discharged as unfit subject, to State Board of Charity, 

Discharged as unfit subject, to overseers of the poor, . 

Discharged to parents, to go out of State, 

Committed to School for Feeble-minded, 

Committed to hospitals and almshouses, 

Dead, 



5 
3 

12 
1 
1 
8 

17 
6 

19 



72 



1,357 



B. Shoiving Condition by Ages of All Boys outside the School, subject 
to its Custody, also including Runaways from the School and 
those transferred to the Massachusetts Reformatory. 

Condition of all boys under twenty-one on probation up to Oct. 1, 1905 : — 

648 or 69 per cent. 

70 or 7 per cent. 
109 or 11 per cent. 

44 or 5 per cent. 

81 or 8 per cent. 

952 



Doing well, • 

Not doing well, .... 
In some penal institution, 

Out of the State 

Whereabouts and condition unknown, 



Condition of boys under twenty-one on probation one year or- more: — 



Doing well, 

Not doing well, .... 
In some other institution, 

Out of the State 

Whereabouts and condition unknown. 



446 or 61 per cent. 
63 or 9 per cent. 
82 or 12 per cent. 
40 or 6 per cent. 
63 or 9 per cent. 

694 



Condition of boys under twenty-one on probation two years or more: — 
Doing well 416 or 67 per cent. 



Not doing well, .... 
In -Mine other institution, 
Out of the State, .... 
Whereabouts and condition unknown, 



52 or 8 per cent. 
59 or 10 per cent. 
35 or 6 per cent. 
55 or 9 per cent. 

617 



Condition of all boys under twenty-one on probation who complete their 

nineteenth year before Oct. 1, 1905: — 
Doing well, 110 or 65 per cent 



Not doing well, .... 
In some other institution, 
Out of the State, .... 
Whereabouts and condition unknown, 



16 or 9 per cent. 

-22 or 13 per cent. 

6 or 4 per cent. 

16 or 9 per cent. 



170 



54 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 3 — Concluded. 

Condition of all boys under twenty-one on probation who complete their 
twentieth year before Oct. 1, 1905 : — 

Doing well, 99 or 58 per cent. 

Not doing well, 19 or 11 per cent. 

In some other institution, 27 or 15 per cent. 

Out of State, 11 or 7 per cent. 

Whereabouts and condition unknown, . . . 16 or 9 per cent. 

172 



Condition of all boys who complete their twenty-first year before Oct 1, 

1905: — 

Doing well, 94 or 62 per cent. 

Not doing well, 6 or 5 per cent. 

In other penal institutions, 19 or 12 per cent. 

Out of State, 12 or 8 per cent. 

Lost track of : — 

Doing well at last accounts, ... 2 

Not doing well at last accounts, . . .18 

20 or 13 per cent. 

151 
Table No. 4. 

Commitments from the Several Counties, Past Year and previously. 



COUNTIES. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Totals. 


Barnstable, . . • . 


3 


67 


70 


Berkshire, 












9 


285 


294 


Bristol, . 












25 


807 


832 


Dukes, 












- 


18 


18 


Essex, 












22 


1,292 


1,314 


Franklin, . 












- 


70 


70 


Hampden, 












24 


525 


549 


Hampshire, 












- 


108 


108 


Middlesex, 












51 


1,610 


1,661 


Nantucket, 












- 


18 


18 


Norfolk, . 












7 


522 


529 


Plymouth, 












6 


171 


177 


Suffolk, . 












29 


1,801 


1,830 


Worcester, 












15 


971 


986 


Totals, 


191 


8,265 


8,456 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



55 



Table No. 5. 
Nativity of Parents of Boys committed during the Past Ten Years. 





o 

o 

00 




at 


05 
9) 
00 


© 

S5 


© 
© 


e 
© 


© 
© 


© 


us 

© 
© 


Fathers born in the United States, 


13 


16 


8 


8 


16 


18 


20 


23 


21 


14 


Mothers born in the United States, 


14 


15 


28 


21 


15 


19 


19 


8 


22 


20 


Fathers foreign born, .... 


8 


12 


25 


18 


12 


17 


17 


8 


19 


16 


Mothers foreign born, .... 


6 


11 


10 


17 


16 


15 


14 


24 


19 


12 


Both parents born in United States, 


27 


23 


31 


27 


36 


47 


52 


48 


32 


46 


Both parents foreign born, 


51 


34 


56 


47 


90 


83 


80 


71 


74 


89 


Unknown, 


34 


34 


45 


44 


11 


14 


17 


17 


18 


23 


One parent unknown, .... 


23 


32 


33 


36 


13 


13 


22 


13 


29 


12 


Per cent, of American parentage, . 


28 


31 


27 


25 


30 


35 


37 


36 


30 


32 


Per cent, of foreign parentage, 


40 


37 


40 


39 


60 


54 


40 


50 


52 


53 


Per cent, unknown, .... 


32 


32 


33 


36 


10 


11 


14 


14 


18 


15 



Nativity of Boys committed during the Past Ten Tears. 



Born in United States, 
Foreign born, . 
Unknown, 



115 


103 


146 


130 


142 


158 


167 


153 


155 


29 


20 


33 


37 


30 


24 


26 


18 


23 


- 


1 


5 


1 


1 


3 


2 


3 


1 



171 

18 

2 



Table No. 6. 
Authority for Commitments during the Past Year. 



COMMITMENTS. 



Past Year. 



By district court, 
municipal court, 
police court, 
superior court, 
trial justices, 
State Board of Charity, 
Total, . 



96 

28 

53 

3 

3 

8 



191 



56 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 7. 
Age of Boys when committed, Past Year and previously. 





Committed 


Committed 


Committed 




AGE. 


during 


from 


previous to 


Totals. 




Past Year. 


1S85-1904. 


1885. 




Six 






5 


5 


Seven, 


1 


- 


25 


26 


Eight, 


- 


9 


115 


124 


Nine, 


4 


17 


231 


252 


Ten, 


5 


74 


440 


519 


Eleven, 


14 


163 


615 


792 


Twelve, .... 


32 


412 


748 


1,192 


Thirteen, .... 


51 


754 


897 


1,702 


Fourteen, .... 


79 


1,215 


778 


2,072 


Fifteen, 


5 


75 


913 


993 


Sixteen, .... 


- 


13 


523 


536 


Seventeen, .... 


- 


3 


179 


182 


Eighteen and over, 


- 


- 


17 


17 


Unknown, .... 


- 


12 


32 


44 


Totals, .... 


191 


2,747 


5,518 


8,456 



Table No. 8. 

Domestic Condition of Boys committed to the School during the Tear. 

Had parents, 121 

no parents, *...... 8 

father 31 

mother, 31 

step-father, 13 

step-mother, 5 

intemperate father, 77 

intemperate mother, 4 

both parents intemperate, 7 

both parents separated, .... ... .18 

attended church, 187 

never attended church, 4 

not attended school within one year, 12 

not attended school within two years, 7 

not attended school within three years, 3 

been arrested before, 124 

been inmates of other institutions, 57 

used intoxicating liquor, 7 

used tobacco, 121 

Were employed in the mill or otherwise when arrested, ... 37 

Were attending school, 72 

Were idle, 82 

Parents owning residence, 27 

Members of the family had been arrested, 54 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



57 



Table No. 9. 
Length of Detention of 322 Boys who have left during the Year. 



3 months or less, 






25 


2 years 3 months, 






11 


4 months, . 






4 


2 years 4 months, 






12 


5 months, . 






10 


2 years 5 months, 






7 


6 months, . 






11 


2 years 6 months, 






6 


7 months, . 






7 


2 years 7 months, 






8 


8 months, . 






6 


2 years 8 months, 






7 


9 months, . 






2 


2 years 9 months, 






4 


10 months, . 






2 


2 years 10 months, 






6 


11 months, . 






2 


2 years 11 months, 






1 


1 year, . 






4 


3 years, 






4 


1 year 1 month, 






7 


3 years 1 month, 






- 


1 year 2 months, 






14 


3 years 2 month?, 






7 


1 year 3 months, 






19 


3 years 3 months, 






1 


1 year 4 months, 






10 


3 years 4 months, 






2 


1 year 5 months, 






16 


3 years 5 months, 






4 


1 year 6 months, 






15 


3 years 6 months, 






3 


1 year 7 months, 






8 


3 years 7 months, 






2 


1 year 8 months, 






9 


3 years 8 months, 






1 


1 year 9 months, 






10 


3 years 9 months, 






1 


1 year 10 months, 






9 


3 years 10 months, 






- 


1 year 11 months, 






16 


8 years 11 months, 






- 


2 years, . 






12 


I years, 






3 


2 years 1 month, 






6 





2 years 2 months, 






8 


Total, 322 



Average time spent in the institution, 20.39 months. 

Average time spent in the institution of boarded boys, . 6.83 months. 
Average time spent in the institution of probationers not 

boarded, released for the first time 19.90 months. 



58 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 10. 

Comparative Table, showing Average Numbers of Inmates, Netv Com- 
mitments, Returns and Releases by Probation or Otherwise for 
Ten Years. 





Average 
Number. 


New Com- 
mitments. 


Returned 

for 
Any Cause. 


Placed on 
Probation. 


Discharged 
Otherwise. 


1895-96, 

1896-97, 

1897-98, 

1898-99, 

1899-1900, 

1900-1901, 

1901-1902, 

1902-1903, 

1903-1904, 

1904-1905, 








264.61 
261.87 
279.42 
295.52 
299.65 
303.89 
310.19 
323.37 
319.72 
336.21 


144 
124 
184 
168 
173 
185 
195 
174 
179 
191 


88 
73 
102 
197 
115 
107 
104 
132 
117 
142 


212 

170 
201 
227 
242 
208 
264 
208 
231 
282 


16 
38 
46 
55 
36 
56 
45 
95 
42 
64 


Average 


for t< 


3n ye 


ars, . 


330.49 


171.7 


108.7 


224.5 


49.3 



Table No. 11. 
Commitments by Months for Ten Years. 





1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


1899. 


1900. 


1901. 


1903. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


October, . 


10 


10 


18 


21 


15 


31 


13 


23 


8 


16 


November 




6 


10 


12 


15 


18 


12 


13 


14 


16 


10 


December 




11 


9 


10 


9 


14 


7 


9 


11 


10 


16 


January, 




9 


8 


11 


13 


8 


15 


10 


4 


8 


10 


February, 




7 


9 


12 


8 


12 


8 


21 


3 


9 


6 


March, 




15 


11 


12 


12 


19 


17 


16 


15 


12 


17 


April, 




10 


11 


15 


14 


14 


11 


21 


22 


16 


25 


May, 




9 


7 


21 


14 


12 


11 


21 


15 


20 


18 


June, 




13 


6 


13 


10 


20 


11 


19 


17 


20 


14 


July, 




23 


9 


22 


22 


13 


15 


20 


15 


17 


20 


August, 




23 


13 


17 


15 


14 


29 


13 


18 


23 


17 


September, 


8 


21 


21 


15 


14 


18 


19 


17 


20 


22 


Totals, 


144 


124 


184 


168 


173 


185 


195 


174 


179 


191 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



59 



Table No. 12. 
Offences for which Boys were committed during the Year. 



Assault, .... 


5 


Taking horse and wagon, . . 3 


Attempt to break and enter, 


3 


Tampering and meddling with 


Breaking and entering, 


38 


fire signal box, ... 2 


Giving false fire alarm, 


1 


Taking and driving a horse, . 1 


Habitual absentee, 


4 


Vagabond, 1 


Attempt to commit larceny, 


1 


Receiving stolen property, . 1 


Larceny, .... 


74 


Persistently violating the rules 


Malicious mischief, . 


2 


of the truant school, . . 1 


Stubbornness, . 


51 


Setting fire to buildings, . . 1 


Throwing stones at railroac 







train, .... 


2 


Total, 191 



Table No. 13. — Some Comparative Statistics 

A. Showing the Average Age of Boys released on Probation for the 

Past Ten Tears. 





Years. 




Years. 


1896, . 


. 15.17 


1901, . 


. 15.50 


1897, . 


. 15.15 


1902, . 


. 14.42 


1898, . 


. 15.60 


1903, . 


. 14.50 


1899, . 


. 15.17 


1904, . 


. 15.30 


1900, . 


. 15.31 


1905, . 


. 15.41 



B. Showing the Average Time spent in the Institution for the Past 

Ten Years. 





Months. 




Months. 


1896, . 


. 18.03 


1901, . 


. 20.25 


1897, , 


. 21.00 


1902, . 


. 19.53 


1898, . 


. 19.90 


1903, . 


. 19.03 


1899, . 


. 20.40 


1904, 


. 20.36 


1900, . 


. 19.27 


1905, . 


. 20.39 



60 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 13. — Some Comparative Statistics — Concluded. 

C. Showing the Average Age of Commitments for the Past Ten 

Years. 



Years. 

1896, 13.63 

1897, 13.31 

1898, . . . . .13.17 

1899 13.48 

1900, 13.08 



Years. 

1901, 13.70 

1902, 13.38 

1903, 13.51 

1904, . . . . . 13.47 

1905, . . . . . 13.51 



D. Showing the Number of Boys returned to the School for Any 
Cause for Ten Years. 



1896, 


. 87 


1901, 


. 107 


1897, 


. 73 


1902, 


. 104 


1898, 


. 102 


1903, 


. 132 


1899, 


. 107 


1904, 


. 117 


1900, 


. 115 


1905, 


. 142 



E. Showing Weekly Per Capita Cost of the Institution for Ten 

Years. 





Gross. 


Net. 




Gross. 


Net. 


1896, . 


$4 61 


$4 55 


1901, . 


$4 47 


$4 45 


1897, . 


4 72 


4 66 


1902, . 


4 54 


4 47 


1898, . 


4 52 


4 49 


1903, . 


4 74 


4 72 


1899, . 


, 4 39 


4 36 


1904, . 


4 90 


4 87 


1900, . 


4 73 


4 70 


1905., . 


4 63 


4 61 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



61 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Current Expenses of the Institution. 

1904. — October, received from the State Treasurer, 

November, " " " " " 

December, " " " " " 

1905. — January, 

February, '« 

March, 

April, " " " " " 

May, 

June, " " " " " 

July, » « » " 

August, " " " " " 

September, " " " " " 



$6,660 86 
5,469 72 
7,582 19 
8,045 01 
7,820 38 
8,625 73 
6,020 26 
7,328 68 
5,824 72 
4,372 42 
6,838 39 
6,587 02 

$81,175 38 



Bills paid as per Vouchers at the State Treasury. 

1904. — October, $6,660 86 

5,469 72 
7,582 19 
8,045 01 
7,820 38 



1905. 



November, 

December, 

January, 

February, 

March, . 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, . 

September, 



Expen 



8,62a 7:5 

6,020 26 

7,828 68 

5,824 72 

4,372 42 

6,888 39 

6,587 "2 

$81,1 76 38 



DITURES. 



Bills paid as per Vouchers at the State Treasury {Ads qf 7904, Chapter 

79) for New Oven, 
1904. — October, |43 17 



Appropriation (Acts of 1904, Chapter 156) for Boarding, 
1904. — December, $1,2*0 21 



62 FINANCIAL STATEMENT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 



Appropriation (Acts of 1905, Chapter 118) for Boarding. 

1905. — April $1,282 44 

July 1,147 41 

October, 1,187 51 

$3,617 36 

Appropriation (Acts of 1905, Chapter 82) for Conduit. 

1905. — September, $708 30 

September, . . . . . . . . 162 12 

1870 42 
Amounts drawn from the State Treasury. 

Appropriation (Acts of 1904, Chapter 79) for the New Oven. 
1904,— October, $43 17 

Appropriation (Acts of 1904, Chapter 156) for Boarding. 

1904. — December, $1,286 21 

Appropriation (Acts of 1905, Chapter 118) for Boarding. 

1905. — April, $1,282 44 

July, 1,147 41 

October, 1,187 51 

$3,617 36 

Appropriation (Acts of 1905, Chapter 82) for Conduit. 

1905. — September, . $708 30 

September, . . . ... . . . 162 12 

$870 42 
Cash Receipts paid into State* Treasury. 

Farm produce sales, $281 81 

Miscellaneous sales, 81 16 

Labor of boys, .......... 32 79 

$395 76 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



63 






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64 FINANCIAL STATEMENT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 



Average Cost per Boy per Day (in Cents and Mills). 





Salaries, Wages and 
Labor. 


T3 

O 

o 

fa 


■S3 

a be 

.i-i o 

3° 


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a 

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FOR THE 

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ENDING - 


o 

a S 


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a> 
H 


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3 

m 


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O 

H 


Sept. 30, 1899, . 
Sept, 30, 1900, . 
Sept. 30, 1901, . 
Sept. 30, 1902, . 
Sept. 30, 1903, . 
Sept. 30, 1904, . 
Sept. 30, 1905, . 


.095 
.102 
.087 
.081 
.075 
.090 
.083 


.072 
.072 
.063 
.077 
.073 
.083 
*.081 


.083 
.086 
.099 
.090 
.100 
.097 
.096 


.252 
.260 
.249 

.248 
.248 
.270 
.260 


.100 
.102 
.102 
.112 
.099 
.107 
.116 


.051 
.065 
.047 
.057 
.042 
.049 
.051 


.018 
.021 
.022 
.019 
.022 
.020 
.021 


.077 
.075 
.062 
.074 
.085 
.086 
.054 


.038 
.057 
.062 
•046 
.040 
.049 
.038 


.051 
.049 
.060 
.048 
.064 
.054 
.063 


.039 
.050 
.034 
.055 
.077 
.065 
.058 


.628 
.675 
.638 
.649 
.677 
.700 
.661 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 18. 65 



SUMMAEY OF FAEM ACCOUNT 

For Twelve Months ending Sept. 30, 1905. 



Dr. 
Live stock, agricultural implements and farm produce on hand, 

as appraised Sept. 30, 1904, $ 14,767 64 

Board, 390 00 

Farm tools and repairs, 1 1,318 25 

Fertilizers, 941 73 

Grain and meal, 2,101 80 

Horseshoeing, 82 18 

Labor of boys, 785 00 

Live stock purchases, 1,940 21 

Ordinary repairs, 94 30 

Seed and plants, 294 50 

Veterinary services, 20 50 

Wages, 1,333 24 

Rent, 385 00 

Net gain, 844 73 

$25,299 08 

Cr. 

Produce sold, $281 81 

Produce consumed, . . 8,521 34 

Produce on hand, 7,772 46 

Live stock, 4,695 30 

Agricultural implements, 4,028 17 

$25,299 08 
Poultry Account. 

Dr. 

To fowl, feed, incubators, etc., on hand Sept. 30, 1904, . . $489 20 

To feed and poultry supplies, 221 93 

To net gain 342 73 

$1,053 86 
Cr. 

By eggs and poultry used and sold, $575 16 

By fowl, feed and incubators on hand, as appraised Sept. 30, 1905, 478 70 

81,053 86 
1 This includes about $750 for dairy machinery. 



66 



SUMMARY LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



SUMMAEY OF THE PEOPEETY OF THE 
LYMAN SCHOOL. 



Real Estate. 






73 acres tillage land, .... 


$14,600 00 




11 acres pasture and wood, 


1,100 00 




72 acres Wilson land, .... 


5,040 00 




3 acres Willow Park land, 


1,500 00 




| acre Brady land, 


1,100 00 




100 acres Berlin land, 


1,100 00 


$24,440 00 



Buildings. 

Administration building, $10,500 00 

Lyman Hall 38,000 00 

Maple Cottage 3,700 00 

Willow Park, 5,000 00 

Wayside Cottage, 5,900 00 

Hillside Cottage, . . . . . 15,000 00 

Oak Cottage, 16,000 00 

Bowlder Cottage, 17,000 00 

The Inn, . 1,000 00 

The Gables, 9,000 00 

Bakery building, 9,800 00 

School building, 40,000 00 

Laundry building 17,000 00 

Greenhouse, 1,600 00 

Hen houses, 1,000 00 

Tool house, Bowlder 20 00 

Scale house, 400 00 

Piggery 300 00 

Cow barn, 11,500 00 

Horse barn, 2,700 00 

Hospital, 12,000 00 

Berlin house, 3,000 00 

Berlin barn, shed and tool house, . . . 1,500 00 

221,920 00 

Amount carried forward, $246,360 00 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 67 

Amount brought forward, f 246,360 00 

Personal Property. 

Beds and bedding, $6,355 49 

Other furniture, 15,029 11 

Carriages, 735 00 

Agricultural implements, 4,028 17 

Drugs and surgical implements, . . . 6,250 00 

Fuel and oil, 2,302 75 

Library, 2,201 75 

Live stock, 4,695 30 

Mechanical tools and appliances, . . . 21,021 24 

Provisions and groceries, 2,017 41 

Produce on hand, 7,772 46 

Ready-made clothing, 6,354 57 

Raw material, 2,595 84 

75,171 59 

$321,531 59 

HENRY L. CHASE, 

Appraiser. 

A true copy. Attest: T. F. CHAPIN, Superintendent. 



68 



OFFICEBS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



LIST OF SALARIED OFFICERS NOW 
EMPLOYED. 



family 



Theodore F. Chapin, superintendent, 

Maria B. Chapin, matron, .... 

Walter M. Day, assistant superintendent, 1 

Harriet L. Day, amanuensis, 

Mr. and Mrs. Morton, charge of family, . 

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Merrill, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. V. E. Backus, charge of family, 

Mr. Eldred A. Dibbel, charge of family, . 

Miss Susie E. Wheeler, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Wiggin, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Bryant, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Tilton, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. Thaddeus Hale, charge of family 

Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Hennessey, charge of 

Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Hoyt, charge of family, 

Wm. J. Wilcox, instructor in carpentry, 1 . 

Emily L. Warner, charge of Berlin farm, 

Mr. and Mrs. Ira G. Dudley, assistants at Berlin 

William G. Siddell, principal, . 

James D. Littlefield, instructor in wood turning 

Anna L, Wilcox, teacher of sloyd, 

Mary F. Wilcox, teacher of sloyd, 

Fannie H. Wheelock, teacher of drawing, 

Charles W. Wilson, teacher of physical drill 

Elizabeth R. Kimball, teacher of music, 

J. Joseph Farrell, teacher of printing, 

Lydia R. Hiller, teacher, . 

Emma F. Newton, teacher, 

Flora J. Dyer, teacher, 

Jennie Kimball, teacher, . 

Mary Knox, teacher, .... 

Gertrude G. Brown, teacher, 

Sadie M. Knight, teacher, . 

Hattie Wiggins, teacher, . 

Amount carried forward, . 



farm, 
and iron work 



$2,300 00 
400 00 

1,100 00 
400 00 
800 00 
800 00 
800 00 
600 00 
300 00 
700 00 
800 00 
700 00 
800 00 
650 00 
600 00 
900 00 
600 00 
800 00 
900 00 

1,200 00 
800 00 
600 00 
600 00 
800 00 
400 00 
500 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
300 00 
250 00 
400 00 
400 00- 

$22,800 00 



Board themselves 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 69 

Amount brought forward, . . . . . . . f 22,800 00 

Florence N. Land, charge of central kitchen, .... 400 00 

Clara A. Middlemas, charge of bakery, 400 00 

L. Florence Edmands, housekeeper, 300 00 

Lilia V. Burhoe, assistant matron, 300 00 

Irving A. Nourse, engineer, 800 00 

Eugene F. Temple, assistant engineer, 360 00 

Frank M. Cockburn, farmer, 1,000 00 

Henry J. Couper, farm hand, 420 00 

, teamster, 400 00 

John T. Perkins, driver, 400 00 

Thomas T. Carey, watchman, 400 00 

Thomas H. Ayer, M.D., physician, 1 600 00 

Ernest P. Brigham, D.D.S., dentist, 1 300 00 

A. C. Jelly, M.D., specialist on feeble-minded, 1 ... 300 00 

May W. Hennessey, nurse, 400 00 

Alexander Quackenboss, M.D., oculist, 104 00 

Chapel speakers, 364 00 

Mr. and Mrs. C. N. Bruce, supply officers, .... 600 00 

, hospital matron, 300 00 

Vacation supplies, 1,818 00 



$32,766 00 

Advisory Physicians, unpaid. 
Orville F. Rogers, M.D. Richard C. Cabot, M.D. James S. Stone, M.D. 

1 Board themselves. 



Appendix B. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 

OP THE 

State Industrial School for Girls 

AT 

I 

LANCASTER 

1904-1905. 



SUPEEINTENDENT'S KEP0RT. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

The year just closing has not been without determined effort, 
and, it is hoped, achievement along important lines. Two years 
ago, believing that so far as possible an institution should handle 
its own emergencies, an appropriation for a hospital was asked. 
Last November it was opened. A trained nurse, a woman of splen- 
did moral fiber, as well as large experience in her profession, was 
placed at the head. Only a daily observer can appreciate the 
demands made upon her; from the first hour of the newly com- 
mitted girl, when a careful physical record is made, a bath and 
complete change of clothing given, — she instructed in the general 
as well as more detailed care of her person, — through all the 
vicissitudes of serious illness to the finger-cut and chiropodal ser- 
vice, she has been untiring. With two 1 exceptions the specific 
cases formerly transferred to the State Hospital have been retained 
in our hospital. The nurse has also at stated intervals visited the 
respective family cottages, to investigate and instruct in personal 
cleanliness. 

Collateral work in the hospital has been that of the dentist, the 
oculist, and the specialist on mind diseases. This advance in 
knowledge of the physical must result in a moral uplift. 

Last year's report made mention of the classification rendered 
possible by the segregation of the backward girl. A cottage was 
set aside, and officers equipped for the special work supplied. Be- 
lieving that the smaller the mind the greater the care necessary 
for its development, methods in work and play conducive to variety 
and relaxation were introduced. As a baby needs a new toy every 
hour to entertain it, so these child minds need constant and chang- 
ing stimulation. Great and costly elaborations have been found 
unnecessary, but simple variety at small output. In the schoolro 
besides the routine work, is given them paper and raffia weaving, 
paper building and cutting, basketry, nature study, free-hand draw- 
ing and color schemes. In this class the value of sloyd reaches its 
highest demonstration. In the sewing-room these girls are by 

1 See physician's report. 



74 SUPT.'S REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

careful training holding their own with those of higher intellectual 
grade, not only mastering the commonest sewing, but advancing to 
cutting and fitting of plain cotton gowns. The kitchen is a model 
of order and cleanliness, and there are no happier faces on the 
grounds. This from girls who, former ly scattered in twos and threes 
among twenty-five others in cottages of higher grade, must either 
claim an enormous quota of the officer's time which justice de- 
manded for the large majority, or be set aside as useless, and conse- 
quently unhappy members of the household. No cottage among us 
calls for officers of broader training or larger culture. The teacher 
finds her full college course, with additional special training, none 
too adequate for the work with these human mites. The economy 
of nerve force to the officer, and the advantage to the individual 
girl in this grouping of the feeble minds, needs to be tried to be 
appreciated. With us the results have far exceeded our anticipa- 
tions. Such work has also dissolved into two distinct grades the 
latter class, — one capable of but small development, who all their 
lives must be dependent upon such protection as the well-ordered 
institution can provide, the other able to be made self-supporting 
under favorable placings in families. It is to the latter the ener- 
gies of our training should be bent. 

The Bolton branch has certainly vindicated its attempt to give 
to a certain class of girls who have already had the regular school 
training, but whom repeated placings in families have proven it 
necessary to longer retain under the protection of the school, an 
additional length of time without the demoralization inevitable 
from enforced idleness. Hundreds of quarts of canned fruits and 
vegetables, stored in the cellars of the various cottages, represent 
the enormous returns from the Bolton gardens, — largely the work 
of the girls. An added satisfaction for the year has been the suc- 
cessful placing out of same girls ; another instance of the advantage 
of grouping of like qualities for application of special methods. 

During the past year there has come to me not only from the 
co-laborer in other institutions, but also from the thinking public, 
no inquiry oftener repeated than that regarding the possible facili- 
ties we may provide for the lying-in patient. Any one who has 
to do with an institution knows that there must be made provision 
for the occasionally newly committed unfortunate, as well as the 
one who, having gone out from us, is returned a victim to selfishness 
on the one hand, to irresponsibility on the other. While the institu- 
tion continues to make no arrangement for the lying-in, an old 
farmhouse, a feature of the Bolton property, serves as home for the 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 75 

pregnant girl until period of transfer to lying-in department of the 
State Hospital. 

The school work has been marked by a steady advance. The 
inauguration of a two-months vacation from the regular school- 
room during the months of July and August warrants in its results 
a repetition of the same the coming year. Lawn clipping, additional 
garden and farm work, walks about the grounds and country roads, 
visits to the town library and bird museum, picnics and ball games 
replaced schoolroom and books. An entire corps of supplies made 
it possible for the regular teachers to avail themselves of summer 
school methods, and return to their work with the added impetus 
that contact with the outside brings. The sloyd has been maintained 
with the same laudatory results. The work accomplished in music 
has been quite a feature of the school's interests. The efforts of 
the teacher have been painstaking and discriminating, the fruits of 
her labors most effective. Particularly beautiful among the musical 
programs have been those of the Sunday services. Last spring the 
pretty little cantata of " Cinderella " was given by the choir girls, 
first presented to the school, the next week repeated to guests invited 
from the town. The delicate costuming represented small moneyed 
expenditure, but much thought and many trained fingers on the 
part of both officers and girls, and a forward jump toward respecta- 
bility to the girl, hardly to be estimated. 

With all the accomplishments in the schoolroom, sewing room 
and kitchen, the year has assuredly not been one of all work and no 
play. Sports have held their own, — strong factors in reform. The 
year around affords no greater incentive to right doing than the 
anticipation for weeks of the coming Fourth of July, — a day of 
picnics and baseball meets, beginning with its early morning parade, 
and closing with the event of the social season, — the grand dance 
on the green. Colored lanterns are strung, an orchestra from the 
city afforded, ice cream and cake are served, and after the dancing 
a grand finale of fireworks. In their pretty white dimity gowns for 
the evening hours, these 300 girls arc other folks. Enthusiasm in 
sports reaches its height during the baseball season. Each cottage 
has it- team, culminating in frequenl competitive meets. Baseball 
suits are donned, colors carried, and wild cheering prevails. The 
winning team bears to it- cottage a silveT Loving cup. Proud is 
the family which displays in -late -aid cup, and thrice fortunate 
the girl wlm. through the courtesy demanded on the diamond in 
gracefully meeting defeat, lias learned control of self. 

With all the equipment of an institution, one must constantly 



76 SUPT.'S KEPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

revert to the main purpose, — the girl and her development. Fine 
buildings are imposing, and elaborate equipments often cater to 
popular craving ; but there is no equipment which can take the place 
of the intelligent officer, alert to the situation, whose energy is 
moderated by patience, whose judgment is widened by a vital inter- 
est in the individual girl. Too much stress cannot be laid upon 
the officer. More and more do I feel in the work the necessity of 
the superior officer, who, in her hourly contact with the girl, is able 
with discriminating power to weigh her possibilities, and from 
these conditions to evolve that which shall represent its success. 
Herein lies one of the largest responsibilities of the position as head 
of an institution, — that of the selection of the right officer, and 
the fitting of the individual girl to her. 

That practical results warrant this degree of effort on part of so 
many, as well as the State expenditure involved, below are one or 
two letters received during the year from those gone out from the 
institution's training to do for themselves : — 

Dear Mrs. Morse : — It is a long time since I have written you, but 
don't think I have forgotten my best friends. I have thought of you more 
than once, — I have been home for a week on a visit. While there I met a 
girl who was going astray. I spoke to her pleasantly ; told her she ought 
to stop it ; — the next day I told her mother she ought to go to the Lan- 
caster school. I shall do all in my power to get girls there so they will be 
better women in the future. I have learned my lesson ; — I have learned to 
be an honest woman and hope to keep on in the future. I am earning $>4 a 

week, and Mrs. says if I decide to stay after I am twenty-one she will 

raise my pay. Mrs. is a cripple, and I do all the house duties and 

have been lately taking charge of things. 

This from one whose former record was most hopeless. Another 
one writes of her new home : — 

My Dear Friend : — I must hasten to tell you of my happiness. I was 

married Oct. — to , a very nice fellow who neither smokes, drinks, nor 

swears— he is a carpenter by trade; — has quite a little money to start 
house-keeping with. We have a cute little home of our own — think of it, 

Mrs. , a home of our own. His people are very respectable, and well 

off, too. I have a lovely time cooking for him. He tells me I am the best 
cook he has ever known, and that helps me. I think I shall be very happy. 
If at any time you come to shall be pleased to see you. 

Write soon. Yours in haste but respectably, 

Yet another from one who has for two or three years attended 
an academy of more than local reputation, and who has identified 
herself with the social enterprises of the school and community : — 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 77 

My Dear Friend : — We desire very much to send two delegates to the 

Y. W C. A. convention at this summer. If we can raise $25 more it 

will be possible. Realizing the benefit this will be to the society will you 
kindly help us in this undertaking by sending us a dollar or what you feel 

you can. 

Yours sincerely, 

A. B. C, 

Prest. of the Society. 

With an average number identical with that of last year, 209, 
our total expenditures vary but little, the fluctuations following to 
an interesting degree those of the markets. While as a whole pro- 
visions and supplies fall under those of last year, the expense on 
flour and butter exceed by quite a margin that of last year. A 
larger outlay on sugar, to meet the unusual amount of fruit can- 
ning; that of fuel and lights to provide for hospital and an addi- 
tional building at Bolton, as well as a severe and continued winter. 
Dry goods, boots and shoes, while lower prices in former have made 
possible a decrease, more has been expended in latter, equalizing 
themselves. With the larger duties of the hospital, medical supplies 
have doubled. Ordinary repairs exceed somewhat those of last 
year, covering in the main remodelling the old cow barn into hay 
barn and stable; finishing, from space formerly occupied by cow 
stalls, a milk room, grain room, hospital room for stock and sleep- 
ing room for barn watchman ; painting out-buildings, cottage roofs, 
hospital and office. A vegetable cellar has also been partitioned off 
and fitted in the basement of the new cow barn. Several old hen 
houses and barn sheds have been torn down and cleared away. Mak- 
ing of new and remodelling of old farm carts, sleds and tools were 
odd-moment duties of the winter farm hands; also during the 
winter screens for cottages and hospital have been made, storerooms 
and wardrobes, chests and linen cases being built into the latter. 

It is a matter of congratulation that successful achievement along 
enlarged lines has made practical yet larger growth. The new 
cow barn, with its much-needed increased accommodations, demands 
a larger silo. The hospital, though well equipped as to officer-, ld 
its possibilities, as demonstrated in the year's work, demands fur- 
ther furnishings and more elaborate apparatus. The old shop, 
which for years has served as a storehouse, with the growth of the 
institution has become in every way inadequate. A small cold 
storage would, from an economic standpoint, become a valuable 
investment. At present, because of no facilities for preservation of 
same, meats and perishable provisions must be purchased in so 
small quantities as to allow very little advantage in the buying. 



78 SUPT.'S REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

Surplus of eggs produced must be sent away for storage to make 
them available during the shortage season. Unless provision can 
be made for successful handling, a large farm production may 
prove an extravagance. I would again refer to the advantages of 
a central laundry and bread kitchen, for more detailed training in 
these very common branches. A building remodelled from the old 
hospital needs only slight equipment as to furnishings and officers 
to become, for the present, adequate to the attempt. 

The returns from the farm show a profit exceeding by $1,000 that 
of last year. By accurate account there is credited to the dairy a 
net profit of $1,206.46; hogs, $465.75; hens, $114.62. The larger 
accommodations of the new cow barn are making it possible to 
experiment in raising our cows. With our abundant supply of 
grass, and the additional labor involved calling for no extra hire, 
the cost of rearing is so slight as certainly to demand attention as 
an economical consideration. 

The following figures sum up the year's school population. On 
pages 86-104 will be found statistics of outside placings, etc. 
Xumber in school beginning of year, 215: close, 209; maximum 
number, 222; minimum, 199; average, 209. Commitments, 79. 
Average weekly gross per capita cost, $4.35; net, $4.33. 

Eespect fully submitted, 

FANNIE FEENCH MOESE, 

Superintendent. 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 79 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and State Industrial Schools. 

The opening of the new hospital was not marked by any special 
celebration, because before the building was quite finished the spa- 
cious ward served as a camp during the repairs on the old houses. 
The furnishing has never been completed, on account of lack of 
funds, but we hope by next year to have everything we require. 

In the selection of a trained nurse our superintendent was par- 
ticularly fortunate. A fair idea of the manifold demands upon her 
time and patience may be gathered from this report. She has been 
ever faithful and cheerful, and for her devotion many patients have 
reason to be grateful. Our first patient had a contagious disease, 
and she was isolated in a private room, so with this case began our 
duties at the hospital. At first it was rather difficult to adjust 
ourselves to new conditions, but soon both officers and girls began 
to manifest an interest, and the change was effected with scarcely 
any friction. The private rooms we found best adapted to our 
peculiar needs, although the general ward lias never been unoc- 
cupied. 

The receiving room, with adjoining bath for the use of new and 
returned girls, has proven a splendid innovation both from a social 
and hygienic standpoint. Under the supervision of the nurse each 
girl receives a tub bath and shampoo, and she is given a thorough 
physical examination. The height, weight, pulse and temperature 
are taken, physical defects or suspicion- symptoms noted, the teeth 
are examined, and valuable data secured for future reference. Pro- 
riding there appears no reason for detaining the girl, she is given 
a fresh outfit, and, neatly dressed, is sent to the superintendent's 
office to be assigned to the house selected. Seventy-nine new girls 
and 159 returned ones were attended during the year. 

Fiftv-nne girls remained from three (\;)\> to four months, with 
an average of two and a half weeks each, in the hospital. Of these, 
17 were treated for specific or allied diseases, 1 for scabies, 
tonsilitis, 2 acute indigestion, 2 multiple furunculosis, 1 chorea, I 
acute carbolic acid poisoning, 1 rheumatism. 1 impetigo contagiosa, 



80 PHYSICIAN'S REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

1 herpes, 1 scalp wound, 1 incipient phthisis, 1 salpingitis and 5 for 
observation; 2 were operated upon under ether for chronic endo- 
metritis. In addition, from 5 to 15 visited the hospital daily, except 
Sundays, with minor complaints or for treatment prescribed, includ- 
ing douches, enemas, extra baths or shampoos, scalp treatment, 
chiropody, administration of drugs, etc.; and many and various 
were the unrecorded attentions given, which added materially to 
the comfort, happiness and health of the girls. The dentist in his 
weekly visits makes many mouths wholesome, and undoubtedly 
contributes no small share to the general welfare. An eye, ear and 
throat specialist was appointed recently, and several girls were 
fitted to glasses; 3 had both tonsils removed and 2 were treated for 
ulcers of the cornea. Much confusion and unnecessary expense is 
sure to be spared by the regular visits of a specialist on the eye 
and ear. 

Each house was visited recently, and every girl given a thorough 
examination, in case any diseases had developed or been overlooked 
or disguised; and the nurse very kindly gave her services for this 
task. 

Eighteen girls were transferred to Tewksbury, 14 pregnant, 2 
specific and 2 doubtful cases. Three were sent to other hospitals 
for capital operations, 7 to the School for Feeble-minded and 1 to 
a hospital for epileptics. We are indebted to the Massachusetts 
General Hospital and the Eye and Ear Infirmary for many courte- 
sies extended. 

Out-of-door work on the farm during the summer months, aug- 
mented by regular instructions in the gymnasium during the win- 
ter, vary the form of physical exercises for the year. In fact, every 
prophylactic and hygienic measure possible is used to promote the 
moral and physical welfare of those under our care. We must men- 
tion the nurse's assistant, one of our girls, who deserves credit for 
the efficiency and dignity with which she performs her duties. The 
pleasant co-operation of the superintendent, officers and nurse made 
our labors a pleasure, and we are very grateful to all who helped 
to make our past year so agreeable. 

Yery truly yours, 



Worcester, Oct. 6, 1905. 



CLAEA P. FITZGERALD, 

Physician. 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 81 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OP 

THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

PROBATIONERS. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

Last year, at the Massachusetts Conference of Charities, the 
leading woman probation officer of the State said that before a 
girl who had been leading a vicious life conld wisely be put on 
probation, a period in some home or institution was necessary. 
When she is flushed with the first steps of wrong-doing, fear of 
the courts, good resolutions, the occasional visit of the probation 
officer, are not enough to hold her straight in the midst of familiar 
temptations and her former weak or bad associates, who will not 
leave her alone. Time must be given for the excitement to die 
down unfanned by vicious opportunity, while healthy interests are 
supplied and character slowly formed. If the court probation 
officers were to collect and print the results of their work, no girl 
would come to our school with such a report as the following : — 

This girl was brought into court September, 1904, on a charge of larceny, 
to which she pleaded guilty She was placed on probation, and, as she had 
shown an inclination to be wild, she was given a long term of probation, 
which docs not expire until November, 1905 She has repeatedly violated 
her parole, and her behavior has gone from bad to worse, so that she is 

regarded as a common prostitute by many of the citizens of . In April, 

1905, the probation officer surrendered her to the court, and she was com- 
mitted to the Industrial School on her previous plea of guilty to the charge 
of larceny. 

The more complete her knowledge of vice, the harder and less 
hopeful is our thorough-going effort to bring the good in a girl to 
flic top. When she becomes a respectable, self-respecting woman, 
the black day- before her commitment are a heavy shame. T. P., 
coming from a shattered family, as a young girl was left to her 
own resources. She hired a room, and was supported by sailors for 



82 VISITATION KEPOKT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

several months. While on probation to us she made a brave fight 
with her undisciplined nature, but her past discouraged her. She 
felt she never could be respectable. This feeling faded somewhat 
after her marriage to a stalwart, thrifty fellow, whose plain, honest, 
well-to-do parents have been won by the helpful, sensible woman, 
fine housekeeper and devoted wife. Yet there is one thing lacking 
in the cosy home, where the visiting minister is sometimes enter- 
tained, — that is, a baby. It is a bitter sorrow that the license of a 
little girl too young to choose between right and wrong has made 
this impossible. 

Protection against herself is owed a child of fourteen or fifteen, 
as much as an education. Often apparently decent parents will 
persist that a girl who has been out late evenings in bad company, 
and away, they know not where, for several nights, has done nothing 
wrong; yet the court evidence shows her to have been unchaste, 
and in some cases to have frequented disreputable houses. It is 
woeful ignorance or fatuous blindness. A girl of twelve, diseased 
to the point of death, was sent to us this year from a comfortable 
home of good reputation. She had been going to the parks and an 
unsavory house for months. In sharp contrast is the father who, a 
few years ago, sent A. M. to the school because from her stubborn 
wilfulness she was in moral danger. The months in the school, 
in the cottage with the more innocent girls, started the transforma- 
tion. She realized her escape. After two years of housework out- 
side the school, during which her good resolutions formed into 
character, she felt her lack of education, and with her savings 
clothed herself while she went to high school, earning her board by 
doing housework, at which she was proficient. Now she has an 
excellent position in a city office, and, although the secret of her 
being in our care has been well kept, she is neither ashamed of 
that nor of her earlier past. 

Last year, of the 79 new commitments, 26 came from families 
known to the Associated Charities; 25 of the girls had been in the 
care of other societies. Through the co-operation of many of the 
societies we learn much of the home and of the girl. Our visitor 
goes to the home soon after the girl has been sent to us, to gain 
the family's confidence and co-operation, and to better understand 
the girl. The home and the girl must be treated as one. When 
the girl is first on probation, her home, if it does not actually draw 
her back, is usually too weak to help her ; but in time, in the major- 
ity of cases, she will return to her people, or they at least will 
remain a strong influence. In the case of S. P., both the parents 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 83 

gave up drinking and the home took on a new tone, in their effort 
to gain the return of their daughter. Since she has been there it 
has continued to improve. 

Often an immediate return home from the school is unwise. 
The transition is dangerous, from the institution, where every act 
receives its immediate reward or punishment, where the untidy 
room means a silent play hour, where a lie means a consequent lack 
of privilege, to the freedom and irresponsibility of a slack home 
government, to the proximity of the old and half-forgotten tempta- 
tions and associates that freshness makes even more attractive. A 
good place at housework in a family holds the girl to the standards 
she has begun to adopt as her own, while the edge of the excite- 
ment of being out in the world wears off in safety. She grows 
accustomed to, and copies, the way in which steady-going people 
live, and learns to enjoy work and simple pleasures. If we had 
enough places like our best, the proportion of girls who are living 
respectably not only at twenty-one, but later in life, would be 
greatly increased. A good place is not merely one where the girl 
has physical comforts, and the people are kindly, well-disposed and 
respectable. The woman of that family must understand and like 
girls. She must have tact to manage them when they are cross, 
sullen, disobedient and unruly. She must have mother wit to 
stamp out lying and petty stealing. She must be firm, patient, 
persistent with laziness, slackness and incompetency. Above all, 
she needs insight and imagination, for she must understand her indi- 
vidual girl, and know how to keep her happy and contented in a 
healthful way. There must be a subtle tone in the family life to 
lift the companionship of the girl with young people of both sexes 
to a level above her former experience; for if a young girl is not 
growing in womanliness and character, time is wasted, and the day 
of her young men friends will come without finding her prepared 
to meet its difficulties safely. We have just such places, and we 
are getting more. When a girl is found to be simply marking time, 
a place i- given up. We do uoi use places thai wan! only a "good, 
Bmari girl/' at low wages. We put the wages low al first, be 
interesl .-mil care are more to our girls than dollars. The emplo}-er 
is the visitor's chief instrumenl in helping the girl, and by the 
visitor's suggestions, counsel ami encouragement, a place is often 
improved. 

The cause of a girl's waywardness cannot be assigned by the 
judge. Home conditions, lack' of restraint, ill-suited work and play, 
may have led to a girl's demoralization. On the other hand, a girl 



84 VISITATION KEPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

may be defective mentally. It is fitting that our school should be 
a clearing house, where girls can be under observation for insanity 
or f eeble-mindedness ; but at present there is no place to send a 
feeble-minded girl not of the simple type so well cared for at 
Waltham. Such a girl is so weak willed as to be the prey of the 
first man she meets, — a poor little forlorn creature, with the pas- 
sions of an animal and none of the reasoning self-control of a 
human being. She must stay in our school until she is twenty-one, 
and then be dumped on the world, or else be earlier given to our 
department to place out. In a place, at the price of eternal vigi- 
lance, she may be kept safe a few years. Even so, it is a hopeless, 
thankless task. There is no value in the placing out system for 
her, no self-reliance to be learned, no character to be developed, no 
happy marriage to be entered into. Horror strikes the uninitiated 
when they first see these girls, and it never leaves the worker 
struggling against certain failure. Permanent institutional care 
is the only humane solution for them. 

The work of our office the past year, exclusive of volunteer assist- 
ance, is outlined in the following statement : — 

Girls seen in places, 1,247 times. 

Girls seen in their homes, 251 times. 

Girls seen elsewhere, 323 times. 

Girls escorted, . 666 times. 

Work hunted with girls, 31 times. 

Work found, other than housework, 12 

Boarding places found for girls at work, . . . . . 3 

Wedding arranged, 4 

Shopping with girls, 113 times. 

Homes visited with girls, 18 times. 

Funerals attended with girls, 1 

Hospital cases, 194 

Girls taken to physicians, . .38 times. 

Girls taken to dentists, 50 times. 

Court cases, .10 

Runaways hunted, 22 times. 

Runaways found, not counting those found by police, . . 3 

Parents or relatives seen, , 252 times. 

Homes reported on, 41 

Places reported on, . . . 290 

Other people interviewed, 805 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 18. 85 

Our expenses were as follows : — 

Salaries, $4,006 19 

Travelling expenses (officers), 1,616 34 

Office expenses : — 

Rent, $300 00 

Clerk and stenographer, .... 705 00 

Telephone, 394 04 

Supplies, 350 93 

Furniture, 126 75 

1,876 72 

Total expended for visiting, $7,499 25 

Travelling expenses (girls), $902 45 

Board, 216 82 

Clothing, 99 31 

Hospitals, medicine, etc., 449 26 

Total expended for girls, 1,667 84 

Grand total, $9,167 09 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARY W. DEWSOX, 

Superintendent of Probationers for the State Industrial School. 

Oct. 2. 1905. 



& 



TATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 



roct 



TATISTIC5 COXCEKSTS'G GIRLS 



Table I. 

Showing Total Slumber i. _ . . " ~ the >:::-: L School, 

both Inside InstUuti : EsMfe. 

In the school S : £0,1904* 215 

le the school, and either on probation, in other institutions, or 
—Iir.f: .:::..; :.l::~- 327 

Total in custody Sept. 30, 1901* 542 

Since committed, .79 

621 

Attained majority, SS 

8 Honora fc iscfa g e :'. " f r : m custody for good conduct, . . 2 
Discharged as unsuitable subject, 1 

Total whc passed rut of custody, 83 

Total in custody Sept 30, 1905 533 

Ret decrease within the year, 9 



Tablz II. 

Show ; Stat : S^t. 30, 1905, of AU 9 ': Justody of the StaU 
Industrial School, being all those committed to Uu School who are 
'-: Tux ty-one. 

On probation with relatives, 42 



On probation with relatives out of 2"t~ En gland, 
On probation in families, earning wages. . 
A: work el sewhexe, not living with relatives, 
At academy or other school, self-supporting, 1 

A: :i 

Married, but subject to recall for ansa, 
Left home or place, whereabouts unknown, 2 
Discharged from Reformatory Prison, this 



•:: 

136 
5 

7 
1 

5". 

31 
4 



Ii :': 



: Sep: ;:. : 



29C : 
80S 



1 Occasional help with clothing. 
■ - L '.-. ■ ■ -_: H:_:t : ~:ip-ri iz . 



---z 'z-\-'-^z\-.-.z. '-- z- -.:::- 1 ir'.za 

m the school. 

ration for part or all of the year. 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



87 



Table II. — Concluded 
In other institutions : — 

Hospital, 

Insane asylum, 

School for the Feeble-minded, . 
Reformatory Prison, sent this year, . 
Reformatory Prison, sent prior years, 

Total in custody Sept. 30, 1905, 



8 

4 

11 

4 

1 



28 
533 



Table III. 

Showing the Number coming into and going from the School 

In the school Sept. 30, 1903, 

Since committed, 



Recalled to school : — 
For change of place, .... 

For a visit, 

On account of illness, .... 

From hospital, 

For observation as to sanity, 

For running away or planning to run, 

For larceny, 

Because unsatisfactory, 

For striking employer, 

Because in danger of unchaste conduct, 2 

For unchaste conduct, 3 



Individual i 
Girls. 

21 
18 

5 

5 

2 
11 

4 
23 

1 
15 
27 



Released from school : — 
On probation to parents or relatives, . 
On probation at work other than housework, 
On probation to other families for wages, . 
On probation to other families earning board and 

going to school, 

Boarded out, 

Transferred to a hospital, .... 
Transferred to School for the Feeble-minded, 
Transferred to Reformatory Prison, . 



132 



Individual » 
Girls. 



24 

5 

133 

3 
1 
18 
8 
6 



215 
79 



294 



33 

27 

8 

5 

2 

11 

4 

25 

1 

15 

28 



27 

6 

168 

4 
1 

20 
8 
6 



159 * 

453 



1 Counting each Individual under moel serious cause for return during the year. 

2 Eight were in their homes; 7 were in othei families. 

1 Two had run from their husbands ; 'J had run from their hoi : • in their 

homes; 4 ran from their places ; 13 wen; in places; 1 was working by day, liv- 
ing in selected boarding place; 16 pel cent, of all in homes; 12 per cent, of all in 
places. 

* Recalled girls: 107 were recalled once within the year; 2."> twice within the 
year; 2 three times within the year. 

6 Counting each individual under her most recent release. 



88 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, 



[Oct. 



Table III. — Concluded. 

Released from school— concluded. 

Of age, moral imbecile, 

Ran from the Industrial School, .... 

Remaining in the school Sept. 30, 1905, . 

Table IV. 

Showing Length of Training in the School before Girls were placed 
out on Probation for the First Time. 



[ndividual 
Girls. 

1 


1 


3 

202 


3 
244 ' 

. 209 



In places : — 








Tears. 


Months. 


Years. 


Months. 


I 2 girl, . 


4 


6 girls, ... 2 


- 


I 2 girl, 






- 


9 


2 girls, 






2 


1 


1 girl, 








2 


2 girls, 






2 


2 


3 girls, 








3 


1 girl, 






2 


4 


6 girls, 








4 


1 girl, 






2 


7 


6 girls, 








5 


1 girl, 






2 


8 


5 girls, 








6 


1 girl, 






3 


4 


6 girls, 








7 


2 girls, 






3 


5 


8 girls, 








8 


1 girl, 






3 


8 


4 girls, 








9 


1 girl, 






3 


9 


2 girls, 








10 


1 girl, 






5 


5 


3 girls, 








11 


19 girls, 2 years or over. 




46 3 girls, 




under 2 


- 






65 3 girls, on an average of 1 


year, 1 


months, 6 days. 




With friends : — 








l'girl, • • • 


1 


2 girls, . . 1 


6 


I 5 girl, . . 


- 


3 


2 girls, 






1 


7 


1 girl, 


- 


8 


3 girls, . 






1 


8 


1 girl, . . . 


1 


- 


1 girl, 






1 


10 


2 girls, 


1 


1 


1 girl, 






2 


- 


1 girl, . . 


1 


4 


1 girl, 






2 


2 


1 girl, 


1 


5 






IS 6 girls, on an average of 1 


year, 4 


months. 





1 Released girls: 163 went out once within the year; 36 twice within the year; 3 
three times within the year. 

2 Placed in a family to go to school. 

8 One returned this year for unchaste conduct ; 4 because in danger of unchaste 
conduct ; 1 is at large ; or 11 per cent, of the 65 girls. 

4 To he married. 

5 Soon excellently married, and later honorably discharged. 

6 Two returned this year because in danger of unchaste conduct, or 9 per cent, 
of the 18 girls. 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



89 



Table V. 

Showing Length of Training in the School before Girls who had been 
recalled were placed out on Probation again during this Year. 1 



Recalled for unchaste conduct 


: 


Recalled for larceny : — 




Mos. 


Days. 


Mos. 


Days. 


1 girl, 




. - 


6 


1 girl, . - 


15 


1 girl, 






2 


- 


1 girl, ... 2 


15 


2 girls, 






5 


- 


1 girl, ... 12 


- 


1 girl, 






6 


15 


1 girl, ... 15 


- 


1 girl, 






7 


- 


4 o*irls, on an average of 7 m 


onths, 


1 girl, 






7 


15 


12 days. 




1 girl, 






8 


- 






1 girl, 






8 


15 






2 girls, 






9 


15 


Recalled for running away : — 




2 girls, 






15 


- 


Mos. 


Days. 


2 girls, 






16 


- 


1 girl, . - 


7 


15 girls, on an average of 8 months, 


1 girl, ... 3 


- 


20 days. 




1 girl, ... 4 


15 






3 girls, on an average of 2 months, 






16 days. 








Recalled because unsatisfactory : — 






Mos. 


Days. 


Recalled because in danger of un- 
chaste conduct ; — 


1 girl, 
1 girl, 






- 


6 
15 


Mos. 


Days. 


3 girls, 






1 


- 


1 girl, 




. 


15 


1 girl, 






1 


15 


1 girl, 






1 


15 


1 girl, 






2 


- 


2 girls, 






5 


- 


3 girls, 






2 


15 


1 girl, 






5 


15 


4 girls, 






4 


- 


1 girl, 






7 


15 


3 girls, 






5 


- 


1 girl, 






8 


- 


1 girl, 






5 


15 


1 girl, 






8 


15 


1 girl, 






7 


- 


1 girl, 






9 


15 


2 girls, 






7 


15 


1 girl, 






15 


- 


1 girl, 






10 


- 


10 girls, on an average oi 6 months, 


28 girls, on an average of :5 months, 


14 days. 




23 days. 





1 Not including girls returned for change of place, illness, etc. 



90 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table VI. , 
Showing Number of Relocations 1 of Girls during the Tear 



125 were relocated once. 
51 were relocated twice. 
18 were relocated three times. 



3 were relocated four times. 
1 was relocated eight times. 



198 8 were relocated 301 times. 



1 Not counting those who went home. 

2 Sixty-five were placed on probation in a family for the first time within this 
year. 

Table VII. 

Showing Employment of Girls not placed in Families. 



Assisting mother or relative, . 


12 


Factory, rubber, 


. 2 


Assisting mother 


who keeps 




shirt, . 


. 1 


boarders, 




1 


shoe, . . . 


. 4 


Attending school, living at 




shoe-string, . 


. 1 


home, 


. 


1 


slipper, 


. 1 


Book bindery, . 


. 


1 


watch, . 


. 1 


Business office, . 




3 


Furrier, .... 


. 1 


Dressmaking, . 


. 


4 


Hospital attendant, . 


. 3 


Factory, box, 


. 


1 


Housework, 1 


. 10 


candy, . 


. 


2 


Mill, paper, 


. 2 


cigar, . 


. 


1 


textile, 


. 5 


cracker, 


. 


1 


Printing office, . 


. 1 


leather working, 


1 


Restaurant or boarding house, 


. 4 


necktie, 




1 


Saleswomen, 


. 3 


netting, 


• . 


1 


Soda fountain attendant, . 


. 1 


piano, . 


. 


1 


Telephone, 


. 1 


pottery, 


. 


1 


Not reported, 


. 2 


power 


stitching-ma- 









chine, 


. 


1 




76 2 



1 By the day, 3; living out in families in the vicinity of their homes, after find- 
ing they preferred housework either to work at home or in factory, mill, etc., 7. 

2 Including those coming of age this year. 

Table VIII. 
Showing Gash Account of Girls on Probation. 

Cash received to credit of 177 girls, from Sept. 30, 1904, to Sept. 

30,1905, $2,196 20 

By deposits in savings bank on account of 177 girls, . . . 2,157 00 

By cash on hand, — fractional parts of a dollar could not be de- 
posited, 39 20 

Cash drawn from savings bank on account of 106 girls, from 

Sept. 30, 1904, to Sept. 30, 1905, 2,294 55 

By cash paid, 2,294 55 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



91 



Table IX. 

Shotting Use of Savings withdrawn during the Year. 



USE. 



Number of Girls. 



To prepare for wedding or to start housekeep- 
ing 

Board, lodging and car fare while starting in 
a trade, ....... 

School expenses, 

Doctors' bills, medicine, glasses, foot plates 
braces, etc., 

Dentists 1 bills, 

Clothing, 

To help at home, 

Funeral expenses of sister, 

Expenses for baby, 

Travelling expenses, including express, . 

To repay for money and articles stolen, . 

To pay debts and bills contracted, 

Entire deposit, — to girls going to distant home 

Entire deposit, — girls of age, 1 . 

Divorce, 



21 

5 
4 

17 
13 
34 
2 
1 
6 
5 
4 
3 
2 

23 
1 



141 2 



$706 81 



97 


24 


36 


03 


144 


88 


71 


10 


341 


23 


9 


72 


45 00 


24 


72 


22 


68 


63 


23 


9 


04 


10 00 


654 


17 


58 70 



$2,294 55 



1 One was for girl who was honorably discharged. 

2 One hundred and six individuals, some drawing for more than one purpose. 



Table X. 

Shotting the Conduct of the 88 Girls ivho passed out of Custody 

within the Year. 1 

Living respectably, 60, or 68 per cent. 

Having behaved badly, 16, or 18 per cent. 

Conduct unknown, 2 9, or 10 per cent. 

Conduct not classified,' 3, or 3 per cent. 

1 Fifty-three, or 62 per cent., of these girl? had never been returned to the school 
because of unchaste conduct ; 28 had been returned once for unchaste conduct ; 2 
twice, 1 three times, 1 four times. (Counting as returned 4 who were transferred 
to the State Hospital directly from probation and 6 who were doing badly when 
they came of age. Non-classified group excluded.) 

Forty-five, or 75 per cent., of the 60 girls living respectably when coming of age 
had never been returned to the school for unchaste conduct. 

Of the girls returned for unchaste conduct, 14 individuals were in their homes, 
or 21 per cent, of all the girls at home; 16 individuals were in places, or 14 per 
cent, of all the girls in places. One individual was unchaste in both home and 
place and was counted under both heads. (Based on proportion of all girls under 
age Sept. 30, 1905, who were in their homes and likewise of all who were in pi 

1 One with friends out of New England ; 4 married ; 4 runaways. At last report 
all were living respectably. 

3 Not classified because found to be feeble-minded, or very dull, or insane, and 
therefore unfit for the school or for placing. 



92 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table XL 

Showing, in the Light of their Parents' Nativity, the Status at Twenty- 
one of All Girls coming of Age this Year, excepting the Non- 
classifiable Class. 1 





Living 
respectably. 


Conduct 
Bad. 


Conduct 
Unknown. 


Both parents American, . 




10 


6 


4 


Both parents colored, 




4 


1 


1 


Both parents French Canadian, 




8 


1 


1 


Both parents from the Provinces, 




- 


1 


- 


Both parents English, 






3 


- 


- 


Both parents Scotch, 






1 


1 




Both parents Irish, . 






13 


2 


1 


Both parents German, . 






3 


- 


- 


Both parents Russian, 






- 


- 


1 


Both parents Polish, 






- 


1 


- 


American and French Canadian, 




1 


1 


- 


American and English, . 






2 


1 


- 


American and Scotch, 






1 


- 


- 


American and Irish, 






3 


- 


- 


Colored and French Canadian 






1 


- 


- 


Colored and English, 






1 


- 


- 


French Canadian and English 






- 


- 


1 


French Canadian and Scotch, 






1 


- 


- 


English and Irish, . 






2 


- 


- 


Scotch and Irish, 






1 


- 


- 


Irish and German, . 






1 


- 


- 


Unknown, 






4 


1 


- 








60 


16 


9 



See foot-note No. 3 to Table X- 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



93 



Table XII. 

Showing where Married Girls met their Husbands, and their 
Present Conduct. 








In their Places. 


In thkir Homes. 




Of Age 

Sept. 30, 
1904. 


Under 

Age 

Sept. 30, 

1904. 


Total 
Number 


Per- 
centage. 


Of Age 

Sept. 30, 

1904. 


Under 

Age 

Sept. 30, 

1904. 


Total 
Number. 


Per- 
centage. 


Living respectably, 

Conduct bad or 

doubtful. 
Conduct unknown, 


9 1 
3 


18 2 
4 

2 


27 
4 

5 


.75 
.11 

.14 


9 3 
6 5 

l 7 


19* 

3 6 

4 8 


28 
9 

5 


.67 
.21 

.12 


Totals, . 


12 


24 


36 


" 


16 


26 


42 


- 



Proportion of girls in their places to be married, 
Proportion of girls in their homes to be married, 



18 per cent. 
39 per cent. 



1 First acquainted : before commitment, 1. 

2 First acquainted: before commitment, 2. 

3 First acquainted: before commitment, 1; after return home, 5; time not 
known, 3. 

4 First acquainted : before commitment, 5, of these 3 were married before going 
out on probation ; after return home, 13; time not known, 1. 

' First acquainted: after return home, 3; time not known, 3. 
,; First acquainted: before commitment, 2; time not known, 1. 
7 First acquainted: time not known, 1. 

■ First acquainted : after return home, 2; time not known, 2. 

'■' Based on girls now married and under age, and proportion in places and at 
home Sept. 30, 1905. 



Table XIII. 



Hospital Treatment 


ivas given 


Girls in the Followin 


g Cases: 




Y.y es, defect of vision, 1 
Iritis, .... 


. 36 
1 


Contracted scar,' 
Carbuncle, 1 






Ear inflamed,' . 


7 


Non-malignant tumoi 


. 




Adenoids removed,' . 


. 2 


Hernia, 1 






Swollen mouth glands, 1 


. 1 


Stomach trouble, 1 






Tonsils removed,' 2 


2 


Ulcer in stomach, 






Nasal catarrh, 8 . 


. 2 


Tuberculosis, 1 . 






Flat foot, 1 . 
Weak ankles, 1 . 
Bousemaid's knee, 1 . 


• 8 

1 

1 


Gynaecological, . 

Syphilis/ . 

Pregnancy, 4 




ll 

2 

14 


Slipping knee cap, 
Spinal curvature,' 
Skin disease, 9 


1 
1 
1 


Convalescing, . 




16 



1 Out-patients. 2 Out-patient, l. Ont-patiei 

4 Condition previous to original commitment to the Bchool, 1. 



94 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table XIII. — Concluded. 
Hospitals where treated. 



Boston City Hospital, 
Carney hospital, 
Massachusetts Homoeopathic 

Hospital, . 
Massachusetts Charitable Eye 

and Ear Infirmary, 
Massachusetts General Hospital, 



1 



473 
14 4 



Massachusetts State Sanatorium, 1 



Milton Convalescent Home, 
New England Hospital Dispen 

sary 

North End Dispensary, . 
St. Luke's Convalescent Home 
State Hospital, . 
Vincent Memorial Hospital, 
Cases treated, . 



13 

8 1 
I s 
3 
16 3 
3 
118 



Eight were out-patients. 
Forty-five were out-patients. 



One was an out-patient. 
Ten were out-patients. 



Table XIV. 
Showing Home City or Town of 79 Girls committed within the Tear. 



Boston, 








21 


Ashland, 








Chelsea, 
Chicopee, . 
Everett, 








3 

1 
2 


Bridgeware 

Charlton, 

Clinton, 


r, 






Fall River, . 








4 


Greenfield, 








Fitchburg, . 








1 


Harwich, 








Gloucester, 








1 


Lee, . 








Holyoke, . 
Lawrence, . 








1 
3 


Lenox, 
Leominster 








Lowell, 
Lynn, . 
Medford, . 








1 
3 

1 


Medway, 

Plymouth, 

Sherborn, 








New Bedford, 
Newton, 








3 
3 


Southbridge, 







North Adams, 








1 


From 13 towns, 


. 14 


Pittsfield, . 








1 






Salem, 








1 


From Rhode Isla 


nd, 1 . . 1 


Somerville, 








1 






Taunton, . 
Waltham, . 








2 

2 


Floating, 2 . 


. 3 


Worcester, . 








5 






From 21 cities, . . .61 







1 Placed out in Massachusetts hy Rhode Island State Home and School. 

2 For years in the care of the State or of some children's society. 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



95 



Table XV. 
Showing Technical Causes on 79 Commitments within the Year. 



Stubbornness, 1 . 


50 


Idle and disorderly, . 


. 5 


Lewd, wanton and lascivious, 


3 


Common nightwalking, 


. 3 


Lewd and lascivious, 


1 


Larceny, .... 


. 9 


Wanton and lascivious, 


1 


Vagrancy, .... 


1 


Leading a vicious life, 


. 1 


Habitual truant, 


. 3 


Fornication, 


1 


Habitual school absentee, . 


, 1 



1 The charge of stubbornness simply means that the complaint is brought by the 
parent or guardian, and it may cover any offence, from the least serious to the 
most serious. 

Table XVI. 

Showing Ages of 79 Girls committed within the Year. 



12 years, 

13 years, 

14 years, 



5 

5 

20 



15 years, 

16 years, 



21 



Average age, 15 years, 3 months, 14 days. 



Table XVII. 
Shoiving Nativity of 79 Girls committed within the Year. 



Born in Massachusetts, 


41 


Born in Canada, 




Born in Maine, . 


1 


Born in the Provinces, 




Born in New Hampshire, . 


1 


Born in England, 




Born in Vermont, 


1 


Born in Sweden, 




Born in Rhode Island, 


1 


Born in Germany, 




Born in Connecticut, . 


3 


Born in Russia, . 




Born in New York, . 


1 


Born in Italy, 




Born in New Jersey, . 


2 


Born in Syria, . 




Born in Pennsylvania, 


1 






Born in Illinois, . 


1 


Foreign born, 




Born in Minnesota, . 


1 


Birthplace unknown, 




Born in United States, 


54 





96 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. [Oct. 



Table XVIII. 

Showing Nativity of Parents of 79 Girls committed within the Year. 



Both parents American, 1 . 


21 


American and French Cana- 


Both parents French Canadian, 


7 


dian, 2 2 


Both parents from the Provinces 


, 4 


American and Irish, 2 2 


Both parents English, 


1 


American and unknown, , . 1 


Both parents Irish, . 


10 


French Canadian and Scotch, . 1 


Both parents Swede, . 


2 


French Canadian and unknown, 1 


Both parents Norwegian, . 


1 


English and from the Provinces, 1 


Both parents German, 


3 


English and Scotch, . ■ . 1 


Both parents Russian, 


3 


English and Irish, 1 


Both parents Polish, . 


2 


Scotch and Irish, 1 


Both parents Italian, . 


6 


Scotch and unknown, . . 1 


Both parents Syrian, . 


1 


Irish and from the Provinces, . 1 


Both parents unknown, 


4 


French and Spanish, 1 



1 Both parents colored, 4; father colored, mother Indian, 1. 

2 One parent colored, 1. 



Table XIX. 

Showing Domestic Conditions of the 79 Girls committed within the 

Year. 



Both parents at home, 1 


• 


26 


Father and stepmother at home, 


7 


Mother only at home, 2 


• 


21 


Both parents dead, 


2 


Father only at home, 3 


• 


9 


One dead, one whereabouts un- 




Mother and stepfather 


at home, 


3 


known, 


1 



1 Foster parents, 1 ; grandparents, 2. 

2 Divorced from husband, 2 ; husband deserted, 4. 

'■' Mother in penal institution, 1; mother off with another man, 2; mother in 
insane asylum, 1. 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



97 



Table XIX. — Concluded. 



Whereabouts of both unknown, 2 
Lived with other relatives, . 7 
No home, 1 4 

Temperate fathers, . . .20 
Intemperate fathers, . . .32 
Grossly immoral fathers, . . 2 
Criminal fathers, ... 1 
Brother guilty of incest, . . 1 
Temperate mothers, . . .44 
Intemperate mothers, . .12 
Criminal mothers, ... 2 
Grossly immoral mothers, . 12 

Families on associated charities' 

records, 2 26 

Mother or woman in charge of 

the home worked out, . 24 

No woman in the home, . . 7 
Good, normal homes, 3 . .14 

Girl previously worked in mill, 
factory or store, . . . 25 



Worked at housework or caring 

for children, 4 . 
Worked in boarding house 

hotel or restaurant, 
Worked for dressmaker, . 
Was on stage, . 
Peddler, .... 
Kept house at home, . 
Attended school, 

Committed as under the average 
of intelligence, 5 

Ran away from home just pre- 
vious to commitment, 6 . 

Were under the care of the 
State Board of Charity, . 

Been under the charge of homes 
or societies, 7 .... 

Been on probation from the 
courts, 

Been in court before, 



15 

8 
1 
1 
1 
1 
9 



23 



Parents in Syria, 1; stepfather deserted, mother in hospital, 1 ; father refused 
to rapport, mother dead, 1 ; father's whereahouts unknown, mother in penal insti- 
tution, 1. 

Looked up Boston, 22 ; Fall River, 3; Lawrence, 2; Lowell, 1; Lynn, 2; New 
Bedford,;:; Newton, 3; Salem, 1; Somerville, 1; Taunton, 2: Worcester, 4; 
total, 44. 

Not counted normal where mother i- wage earner. 

A 11 but three were in charge of other societies. 

Seven <>f these proved to he of average hrightness, hut eleven others w«t»- 
found, on observation at the school, to he under the average. 

Not Including those who stayed oul aingle eights. 

Some were successively in charge of different societies, making B total of .",1 

3 in 23 different societies. 



98 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table XX. 
Showing Literacy of 79 Girls committed within the Year. 



In first year high school, 




1 


Recently left school, . . .28 


In 9th grade, 




1 


Out of school one year, . .12 


In 8th grade, 




9 


Out of school one and one-half 


In 7th grade, 




11 


years, 3 


In 6th grade, 




18 


Out of school two years, . .15 


In 5th grade, 




12 


Out of school two and one-half 


In 4th grade, 




11 


years, 2 


In 3d grade, 




7 


Out of school three years, . . 13 


In 2d grade, 




2 


Out of school four years, . . 3 


In 1st grade, 




3 


Out of school six years, . . 2 


Could read a little French only 


2 


Never been to school, ' . 1 


Could read a little Italian only, 


1 




Unable to read, . 




1 





1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



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100 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



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Died, conduct has been good, .... 
Honorably discharged, 


II. In Care of but no longer maintained by the 
State : — 
Married, living respectably, .... 

Unmarried, with friends, 

At work in other families, 

At work elsewhere, 

Attending school, paying their way, 


Total no longer maintained and living respect- 
ably, 

B. — Conduct Bad or Doubtful 
I. No longer in the Care of the State : — 

Attained majority (married), in prison or else- 
where, 

Attained majority (unmarried), in prison or 
elsewhere, 


1 • • 

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1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



101 



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»v o/tfAt State : — 

n with friend*, out of New Eng- 

ving left their homes or pluces, :; . 


jct unknown, 

t, WHOSE CONDUCT FOR OBYIOUfl 

0H8 NOT CLASSIFIED. 

of the State; — 
lOhsrged, until, defective or insane, 

on probatlon ( 


re o/ the State: — 

or Insane, In Institutions not penal, 

ustri;il School through the \e:ir, . 

t in private families with schooling, 
illness or change of place, not for 
alt, and remaining in the school, . 


8 
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102 



STATISTICS INDUSTKIAL SCHOOL. 



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Immoral conduct, 

Danger of immoral conduct, 
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3 

o 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



103 



Table XXIV. 

Showing, in the Light of their Age at Commitment {being over or 
under Sixteen Years), the Conduct of the Following Girls: Those 
in the Care of the School throughout the Year ending Sept. 30, 
1905 ; Those coming of Age during the Year ending Sept, 30, 
1905 ; excluding in Both Groups the Non-classifiable Class. 1 







Total 


Over 16 


Under 
16 

Years. 


Per 

Cent. 


Per 

Cent. 




Number. 


Years. 


over 16 


under 16 








Years. 


Years. 


A.— Living respectably. 












/. No longer in the (Jure of the State : — 












Attained majority (married), living 












respectably, 


18 


4 


14 


- 


- 


Attained majority (unmarried), liv- 












ing respectably, .... 


40 


13 


27 


- 


- 


Died, conduct has been good, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Honorably discharged, 


2 


1 


1 


- 


- 




60 


18 


42 


.69 


.71 


//. In Care of but no longer maintained 












by the State : — 












Married, living respectably, 


37 


5 


32 


- 


- 


Unmarried, with friends, . 


43 


8 


35 


- 


- 


At work in other families, 


135 


28 


107 


- 


_ 


At work elsewhere, .... 


5 


2 


3 


- 


_ 


Attending school or academy, pay- 












ing their way, 


7 


1 


6 


- 


- 




227 


44 


183 


.81 


.71 


Total no longer maintained and living 












respectably 


287 


62 


225 


.77 


.71 


B. — Conduct Bad or Doubtful. 












/. No longer in the Care of the State; — 












Attained majority (married), in 












prison or elsewhere, 


6 


2 


4 


- 


- 


Attained majority (unmarried), in 












prison or elsewhere, 


10 


3 


7 


- 


- 




16 


5 


11 


.19 


.20 


//. Still in < are of state, under Twenty- 












one: — 












Married, 


7 


2 


5 


_ 


_ 


On probation with friends or at large, 


5 


1 


4 


- 


_ 


Recalled to school for serious fault 












iiinl remaining, .... 


10 


1 


9 


- 


- 


In prison or house of correction, 


4 


- 


4 


- 


- 


W ere in prison, now discharged, 


4 


_ 


4 


- 


- 


In DOepltsJ through their own mis. 












conduct, 


4 


- 


4 


- 


- 




34 


4 


80 


.07 


.11 


Total, conduct bad or doubtful, 


50 





41 


.11 


.13 


0. — < lOB DI (T NOT KNOWN. 












1 '■>,,, irr fa Hi, far? or tin State : — 












Married 


4 


1 


3 


_ 


_ 


Unmarried, 


5 


2 


3 


- 


- 




9 


8 


6 


.11 


.10 


ft. SHU ' Oareofth State .- — 












Married 


i 




6 


_ 


_ 


On probation with friends, out of 












Niw England 


14 


1 


13 




- 


At large, having left Ibeii homes or 












plaeei 


30 


■"' 


•J.", 


- 


- 




60 


6 


44 


.11 


.17 


1 . SOndnel not known, 




9 


50 


.11 


.11 


1 total 




BQ 


BU 


- 


- 



1 8ee foot-note No. 3 to Table X. 



104 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, 



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1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



105 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Current Expenses and Salaries. 

1904. — October, received from State Treasurer, 

November, " 

December, " 

1905. — January, " 

February, " 

March, " 

April, " 
May, 

June, " 
July, 

August, " 

September, " 



Bills paid 
1904. — October, . 
November, 
December, 
1905.— January, 
February, 
March, . 
April, 
.May, . 
June, 
July, . 
August, . 
September, 



as per Vouchers 



isurer, 






$3,205 94 
2,726 13 
2,729 54 


it 
it 
(t 






7,773 82 

4,300 90 
5,436 33 
3,717 61 


u 






4,745 38 
3,649 14 
2,802 95 
2,773 67 
3,464 48 




$47,325 89 


at State Treasury. 


. $3,205 94 










2,726 13 










2,729 54 










7,773 82 










4,300 90 










5,436 33 










3,717 61 










4,745 38 










3,649 14 










2,802 95 










2,773 67 










3,464 48 




$47,325 89 



106 FINANCIAL STATEM'T INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 



Current Expenses and Salaries of the Department of Boarding 

Out and Probation. 
1904. — October, received from the State Treasurer, 
November, " 



December, 
1905. — January, 
February, 
March. 
April, 
May, 
June, 
July, 
August, 
September, 



Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury. 

1904. — October, 

November, 

December, 

1905. — January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May 

June, 

July, ..." 

August, 

September, 



Expenditures. 



$757 38 
806 65 

1,016 27 
798 26 
595 69 
416 68 
952 64 
808 13 
638 27 
894 83 
542 47 
939 82 

$9,167 09 



$757 38 
806 65 

1,016 27 
798 26 
595 69 
416 68 
952 64 
808 13 
638 27 
894 83 
542 47 
939 82 

$9,167 09 



Bills paid as per Vouchers at the Stale Treasury. 
Appropriation (Resolves of 1904, chapter 81) for repairs and furnishings 
of family houses ; repairs on chapel, concrete walks, Bolton farm house and 
hospital furnishings ; also meadow land improvements : — 

1904. — October . . . . . $1,227 84 

November, 873 09 

December, 238 95 

1905.— January 501 74 

February, 152 77 

March 40 00 



$3,034 39 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 107 

Appropriation (Resolves of 1905, chapter 83) for renewing plumbing in 
four cottages, and carpentry work and necessary repairs : — 

1905.- July, ^ $45 00 

August, < 45 00 

September, 146 71 

$236 71 

Amounts drawn from the State Treasury. 
Appropriation (Resolves of 1904, chapter 81) for repairs and furnishings 
of family houses ; repairs on chapel, concrete walks, Bolton farm house and 
hospital furnishings ; also meadow land improvements : — 

1904. — October $1,227 84 

November, 873 09 

December, 238 95 

1905. — January, 501 74 

February, 152 77 

March, 4a 00 

$3,034 39 

Appropriation (Resolves of 1905, chapter 83) for renewing plumbing in 
four cottages, and carpentry work and necessary repairs : — 

1905. — July, $45 00 

August, 45 00 

September, 146 71 

$236 71 

Cash Receipts paid into the State Treasury. 
Farm produce sales, $193 54 



108 FINANCIAL STATEM'T INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 






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3 and entertain- 

s and transporta 

btospital supplies 

rlnting supplies, 
ways, . 
etc., . 

office supplies, , 
and school sup 

telegraph, . 

1 supplies, . 
ons and harness 

28, seeds, etc., , 

ive stock, . 
ichines, etc., 






o <n S 


• 






■S 2 . . 8 - 








ci "C _r S to 








and 1 
groce 
ateria 

prove 
odical 


• 






Salaries, wages 
Provisions and 
Clothing and m 
Furnishings, 
neat and light, 
Repairs and im 
B ioUs and peri 
Chapel servicei 

ments, 
Freight, expres 

tion, . 
Medicines and ■] 
Postage, 
Printing and p 
Return of runa 
Soap, laundry, 
Stationery and 
School books 

plies, . 
Telephone and 
Sundries, 
Blacksmith anc 
Carriages, wag 

supplies, . 
Fertilizers, vim 
Hay, grain, etc 
Horses, cows, 1 
Tools, farm me 








o 






H 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 18, 



109 



FAEM ACCOUNT, 



Dk. 

To live stock, as per inventory, 1904, 

tools and carriages, as per inventory, 1904, 
miscellaneous, as per inventory, 1904, . 



produce on hand, as pe 

fertilizers, 

farming implements, 

grain, . 

labor, 

live stock, 

services of veterinary, 

plants, seeds and trees, 

harness repairs, 

blacksmithing, 



inventory, 1904, 



Ck. 



By produce consumed, ...... 

produce sold and amount sent to State Treasurer 

produce on hand, as per inventory, 1905, 

live stock, as per inventory, 1905, 

tools and carriages, as per inventory, 1905, . 

miscellaneous, as per inventory, 1905, . 



Balance for the farm, . 



$5,346 


00 


3,100 00 


1,692 93 


5,328 


15 


195 


00 


106 


14 


2,388 


50 


2,991 


12 


21 


00 


57 


50 


112 


76 


37 


70 


357 


72 


|21,734 


52 


$9,250 02 


193 


54 


5,348 


15 


5,306 


80 


3,150 


CO 


1,817 


52 


$25,066 


03 


$3,331 


51 



1 10 



PROPERTY INDUSTRIAL 



>CHOOL, [Oct, 



VALUATION OF PROPERTY, 



State Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster, Oct. l, 1905. 





Real Estate. 




Chapel, 


. #6,500 00 


Hospital, . 










9,000 00 


Putnam Cottage, 










16,000 00 


Fisher Hail, , 










16,000 00 


unison Hall, 


, 








15,000 00 


B ger Hall, . 










12,750 00 


Fay Cottage, . 


. 








13,000 00 


ry Lamb Cottage, 








13,500 00 


Elm Cottage 








4.900 00 


Superintendent's house, . 








10,000 00 


Laundry and bread kitchen. . 








2.500 00 


Storeroom 








S5C :: 


Farmhouse and barn, 








1.300 00 


Large barn 








13.275 00 


Silo, . 










400 00 


■ shop, 










BOO 00 


lee house. 










1,00C DC 


: house, . 


■ • 








600 00 


Two hen houses. 










1,000 00 


1 ggery, . 










1,1 DC 


Reservoir house Nc 


1, ■ 








ioc :: 


Reservoir house No 


2, land, etx 








300 00 


: works, land, etc., . 








7.500 00 


Hose house, hose, etc, 








:.;;; :: 


barn 








125 00 


a 176 acres, 








li.e:. 


Broderiek Lot, 12 acres. . 








i,o :: :: 


1 lot, 10 acres. . 








■::: :: 


51 wm windows. 








40 00 


Corn crib. .... 








100 00 


Root cellar, .... 








175 00 


Bolton annex. 








21,000 00 


Farmhouse 








600 00 


Barn 








100 00 


Amount carried forward,. 


$184,315 00 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18, 



111 



Amount brought forward, 



Tillage, 33 acres, . 
Wood land, 7 acres, 
Wood and sprout lot, 30 acres, 
Spring, 



Personal Property. 
Produce of farm on hand, 
House furnishings and supplies, 
Live stock, .... 
Tools and vehicles, . 
Miscellaneous, 



$184,315 00 




1,800 00 




350 00 




450 00 




200 00 






f 187,115 00 




$5,348 15 




23,928 00 




5,306 80 




3,150 00 




1,817 52 






$39,550 47 



WILLIAM L. BANCROFT, 
ANDREW J. BANCROFT, 

Appraisers. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
Worcester, ss. Lancaster, Oct. 12, 1905. 

Personally appeared the above-named appraisers, and made oath that the state- 
ments subscribed by them are true. 

GEORGE E. HOWE, 

Justice of the Peace. 



112 OFFICERS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. [Oct. 



LIST OP SALARIED OFFICERS NOW 
EMPLOYED. 



F. F. Morse, Superintendent. 

M. B. Atherton, . Assistant Superintendent and Gymnastic Teacher. 
C. P. Fitzgerald, Physician. 

A. C. Jelly, Specialist on Menial Diseases. 

E. T. Fox, Dentist. 

B. V. Smith, .... Steward. 

A. L. Jordan, Matron, Bolton. 

C. M. Church, Matron, hospital. 

A. M. T. Eno, Matron. 

H. A. Woodward, Matron. 

N. R. Maxwell, Matron. 

M. Drown, Matron. 

E. F. Peel, Matron. 

M. E. Mitchell, Matron. 

C. C. Russell, Matron. 

M. C. Westcott . . Matron. 

H. B. Shaw, Supervisor of Schools. 

I. B. Drown, Teacher of Sloyd. 

M.E.Richmond, . Teacher of Music. 

A. M. Sturges, Teacher. 

L. A. Strout, Teacher. 

F. J. Ovens, Teacher. 

A. G. Mansfield, Teacher. 

K. S. Page, Teacher. 

M. A. Bridgham, . . . . Teacher. 

H. Johnson, Teacher. 

N. Brisbin, Teacher. 

G. L. Smith, Acting Clerk and Supply Officer. 

C. E. Stevens, Gardener. 

M. L. Smith, Supervising Housekeeper. 

B. G. Foss, Housekeeper. 

L. Eastman, Housekeeper. 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



113 



A. Crocker, 
E. S. Chadwick, 
J. B. Higgins, 
A. A. Stowell, 
S. E. Randall, 
S. A. King, 
I. N. Bailey, 
W. B. Eastman, 
H. B. Eastman, 

D. H. Bailey, 
A. B. Randall, 

E. W. Harrington, 
A. R. Harrington, 
M. E. Chadwick, 
J. Patmore, 

A. L. Harrington, 
W. Westcott, . 



. Housekeeper. 

. Housekeeper. 

. Housekeeper. 

. Housekeeper. 

. Housekeeper. 

. Housekeeper. 

, Housekeeper. 

Foreman. 

Foreman, annex. 

Carpenter. 

Driver. 

Dairyman. 

Teamster. 

Teamster. 

. Laborer. 

. Laborer. 

Gardener. 



1U VISITORS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. [Oct. 1905. 



VOLUNTEER VISITORS. 



Putnam, Miss Elizabeth C, 
Bacot, Miss Jane McC, . 
Andrews, Mrs. Charles A., 
Brewer, Mrs. Frank C, . 
Cowles, Mrs. William N., 
Crane, Mrs. Emery L , 
Donnelly, Mrs. J. B., 
Edgett, Miss Ruth F., 
French, Mrs. E. V., . 
Fuller, Mrs. Frederick T. 
Hall, Miss Emma R., 
Harlow, Miss Margaret, 
Hurd, Mrs. Alfred G., 
Leonard, Miss Lizzie C, 
McGuigan, Miss Mary A. 
Moore, Mrs. A. C, . 
Morse, Mrs. S. I., . 
Mulcahy, Mrs. John, 
Rockwell, Miss Florence, 
Shattuck, Miss Elizabeth P., 
Sheffield, Mrs. Alfred, . 
Strong, Miss Maud E., . 
Sullivan, Miss May F., . 
Warner, Mrs. Charles H., 
Whiting, Mrs. Howard, . 
Woodbury, Miss Alice P., 



At large. 

At large. 

Holyoke. 

Hingham. 

Ayer. 

Quincy. 

Gardner. 

Beverly. 

Lynn. 

Milton. 

New Bedford. 

Worcester. 

Millbury. 

Bridgewater, 

Peabody. 

Lowell. 

Sandwich. 

Brookfield. 

Montague. 

Boston. 

Springfield. 

Northampton. 

Chicopee. 

Fall River. 

Great Barrington. 

Gloucester. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... .... No. 18. 



TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 



Lyman and Industrial 
Schools 



(Formerly known as Trustees ok the State Primary and 
Reform Schools), 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30,' 1906. 




BOSTON : 
WRIGHT A POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office SQUARE. 
1907. 



Approved by 
The Statf Board of Publication- 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Trustees' Report on Lyman School, 6 

Trustees' Report on State Industrial School, 16 

Appendix A, Report of Treasurer and Receiver-General on Trust 

Funds, 23 

Appendix B, Report of Officers of the Lyman School: — 

Report of Superintendent, 33 

Report of Superintendent of Lyman School Probationers, .... 42 

Report of Physician, 56 

Statistics concerning Boys, 57 

Financial Statement 67 

Farm Account, 71 

Valuation of Property, 72 

List of Salaried Officers, 74 

Statistical Form for State Institutions, 76 

Appendix C, Report of Officers of the State Industrial School : — 

Report of Superintendent, 81 

Report of Physician, 88 

Report of Oculist and Aurist, 90 

Report of Superintendent of Industrial School Probationers, .... 92 

Statistics concerning Girls, 99 

Financial Statement, 119 

Farm Account, 123 

Valuation of Property, 124 

List of Salaried Officers 125 

List of Volunteer Visitors 127 

Statistical Form for State Institutions, 128 



Commcrctoealtb of glassaclnisflis, 



Lyman and Industrial Schools. 



TRUSTEES. 
M. H. WALKER, Westborough, Chairman. 
ELIZABETH G. EVANS, Boston, Secretary. 
M. J. SULLIVAN, Chicopee. 
SUSAN C. LYMAN, Waltham. 
JAMES W. McDONALD, Marlborough. 
GEORGE H. CARLETON, Haverhill. 
CHARLES G. WASHBURN, Worcester. 

HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS. 
THEODORE F. CHAPIN, Superintendent of Lyman School 

THOMAS II . AYER, Visiting Physician of Lyman School. 

« 

WALTER A. WHEELER, Superintendent of Lyman School Probationers. 
FANNIE F. MORSE, Superintendent of State Industrial School. 
CLARA P. FITZGERALD, Visiting Physician of State Industrial School. 
MARY W. DEWSON, Superintendent of Industrial School Probationers. 



€ammanbsza\t\} af IpassaxJMSttts. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To Ills Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools respectlully 
present the following report for the fourteen months ending 
Nov. 30, 190(), for the two reform schools under their control. 

M. H. WALKER. 
M. J. SULLIVAN. 
ELIZABETH G. EVANS. 
SUSAN C. LYMAN. 

james w. Mcdonald. 

GEORGE H. CARLETON. 
CHARLES G. WASHBURN. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS AT WESTBOROUGH. 

The Lyman School receives boys under fifteen years of age 
who are committed to its care by the courts. About one- 
quarter are complained of by their parents for stubbornness, 
but this term is little more than a phrase, used in many cases 
for those with the very hardest record. This illustrates the 
fact that the technical offence for which a boy is sentenced has 
little significance, but is the occasion rather than the cause of 
his commitment. Of all the boys alike it is true that they 
have gotten beyond parental control, and are growing up out of 
joint if not definitely at war with the necessary requirements 
of social order. Self-control and a due regard for the rights 
of others is the lesson which the Lyman School is required to 
teach. Fortunately, the school is invested by the law with the 
authority of a guardian over its ward, and this authority ex- 
tends throughout the ward's minority. 

Dealing with the boys thus through a long term of years, the 
methods employed vary radically, according to a boy's condi- 
tion. Children twelve years old or less, whose chief need is a 
good home, are cared for in an outlying department in Berlin, 
seven miles distant from the main institution, and are soon 
reinstated in the community as boarders in selected families. 
Boys of thirteen and upward, and younger ones who have been 
tried and failed under the family treatment, are given a period 
of systematic education at Westborough, the length of deten- 
tion depending upon a marking system which may keep a boy 
as short a time as ten months, and as long as three or even 
four years. (See Table 9, page 63.) When a boy leaves the 
school, be his stay there long or short, and whether or no upon 
his discharge he returns at once to his own people or is placed 
out with others, all alike remain under the school's supervision 
and are liable to be recalled for bad conduct until they pass 
beyond the State's authority at the age of twenty-one. Of the 
1,005 boys under the care of the school 1 on Dec. 1, 1906, 327 

1 Boys who are in reformatory or other institutions, in the army or navy, out of 
the State, or whose whereabouts are unknown, are not included in these figures, 
but they are accounted for in Table 3, on pages 58 and 59. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 7 

were in the main branch at Westborough, 18 were in the 
Berlin department, 55 were at board, 79 were placed Avith 
farmers, 440 were with their own people, and 86 others, all 
over eighteen years of age, were "for themselves," as the 
phrase goes, some of these working in shops or factories, but 
most of them employed upon farms. Of the 226 new boys 
received from the courts, 1 was only eight years of age, 5 were 
nine years of age, 13 were ten, 24 were eleven, 37 were twelve, 
and 146 were between thirteen and fifteen. 

At the Westborough branch of the institution the boys are 
divided into ten cottage groups ; but they come together in 
graded classes at the central schoolhouse, and in manual training 
classes, for physical drill, instruction in singing, band practice, 
etc. The leading idea of the educational system is industrial, 
as against the purely academic method. The manual dexterity 
which underlies all trades is taught to some extent to every boy, 
and over two-thirds of the school are carried along in advanced 
manual training classes, in printing, shoemaking, carpentry, 
painting or bricklaying, etc. The effort is to so arrange work 
which is essential to the running of the institution that it shall 
contribute to the intellectual and moral development of the 
boys employed therein. Four hours of work (manual training 
classes being included under this head) and four and one-half 
hours in the schoolroom is the usual day's program; but some 
40 <>dd boys over sixteen years of age (most of them returned 
mers) work eight hours a day and attend school only 
in the evening. Pages 35-37 of the superintendent's report 
details as to the instruction and the occupations of the 

The difficulty of runaways [g one which must be met in every 
m school which is not a prison, [n the effort to hold boys 
by their own volition, to touch the inner springs of action, 
loyalty prizes are given out to households which have been free 
lor a given time from runaways; and honor classes win special 
prh including going oil' the grounds for an excursion 

and \ isits to their own people. The boys set much store upon 

s; but, notwithstanding, within the fourl 
months under record no less than 39 different boys absconded, 
several of them escaping two or more time-, and :> l others sue- 
in getting off the grounds, but were returned before 



8 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

nightfall. Every runaway is a serious source of demoraliza- 
tion. Recognizing this, one can only fall back upon the broad 
position that freedom rightly used is so great a good that its 
abuse by the minority must be put up with. Indeed, the very 
boys who were runaways in the days of their first homesick- 
ness, or in a moment of way wardness or discouragement, often 
settle down later and are the ones to profit most by the school's 
opportunities. 

The Berlin cottage is so wholly disconnected with the parent 
institution that neither the boys themselves nor the community 
of which they later become members identify them with the 
boys from Westborough. This is an advantage which it is 
hard to overestimate. The group in the cottage at any one 
time is so small, and the contact with their three caretakers so 
intimate, that there is little need for rules and regulations. 
Unmannerly little urchins, who have apparently never obeyed 
in their lives before, they show themselves quickly responsive 
to influences which would seem to be every child's birthright. 
Several hours a day of rough-and-tumble play allow uproarious 
spirits to find their legitimate expression. At night the grown 
folks take part in the games where fair play has been so little 
practised. After a stay of a few months, the majority are 
judged fit to be boarded out, thereafter to attend the district 
school and be treated in all respects like other boys in the 
community. Half of them, to be sure, eventually fall back 
into lawless ways, either in their boarding places or later when 
they go back to their own people, and are recalled to West- 
borough to receive the benefit of its systematic training. The 
other half are reinstated in the community with no further 
training than that which suffices for the normal child in any 
good home. 1 The following is a letter which was received 
from one of these little boarders : — 

Mar. 6, 1906. 

Dear Mrs. Dudley : — I have been intending to write to you be- 
fore, but I go to school every day and what spare time I have I put 
on my lessons. School will close the nineth of this month, and I ex- 

1 The cost of the whole Berlin outfit, land, house and furnishings included, was only 
$8,500, and its running expenses are very little larger than if it were located upon the 
grounds at Westborough. In all, 469 boys have been received at Berlin since the estab- 
lishment was opened eleven years ago. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 9 

pect it be my last term. I have had bookkeeping this winter and 
have about finished it. 

Mrs. N 's mother passed away last month, and it has left a 

gap in our family. She was ninety-two years old and was at the time 

of her death the oldest woman in R . She could read without 

spectacles and held her mental faculties to a wonderful degree. Her 

name was L W . Her maiden name was W and she was 

a grandneice of Col. Ephraim Williams founder of Williams College. 

Her husband's name was W and he was a direct decendant of 

the famous P W . 

Our family consists of three Mrs. N her daughter aud myself. 

I have seen a flock of Bluebirds this Spring. 

The Spring is drawing near and we will have our feathered friends 
back again. I look forward to it with much pleasure. 

I know most of the birds by playing the game l but havent had the 
opportunity of seeing more than a third of them, but I feel as though 
I was acquainted with them all. 

I enclose a few views of the Berkshires. 

With much love to Mrs. Warner and Mr. Dudley I am 

Sincerely yours, G K . 

A question is often asked as to whether Lyman School boys 
do not resent its system of surveillance during the long years 
of their minorit}^. That they should not do so is a chief point 
in a visitor's skill. To an evil doer no doubt any oversight is 
irksome ; but even here the co-operation of the visitor is often 
gratefully appealed to by parents when their own counsels are 
set at naught. With the majority of the boys who are trying 
to establish themselves in the world and to maintain themselves 
honestly, their visitor is regarded as a friend whose help and 
interest are welcome. This is attested again and again by 
letters and by personal expressions of gratitude and of kindly 
feeling to the school and its officials. 

11 L-y-in-a-n S-e-h-o-o-1 is the place that made a man of me 

and a good many others who have been there," writes W 

T C , a likely young man now working in an elec- 
trical factory, — three times a runaway, as it happened in his 
former days at Westborough. 

Another boy, (i W B . now approaching his 

twentieth birthday, earning good wages as an engineer, and 

1 A bird game invented by the Berlin matron, Mrs. Dudley. 



10 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

whose mother is effusive in acknowledgments of her son's in- 
debtedness to the Lyman School, writes : — 

Aug. 17, 06. 

Friend Mr. Weller 1 : — I received your welcome letter all right, 
and was glad to hear from you. I do take pleasure in answering 
your letters. I am working every day engneer on stationry engines. 
I like that line of work very much. Am liveing at home and expect 
to as long as I have got a Mother. Every thing is going on fine also 
enjoying myself as I go along. I may visit the school this fall if I 
can get off. 

All I can think of just now so good-by. 

Yours truly, G W B . 

Another boy, L B , said to be a descendant of 

King Philip, and called " a terror," was sent to Berlin at the 
age of twelve, and ten months later placed on trial with his 
own people, to be presently arrested and returned to the 
Lyman School. From there he ran away, but was promptly 
returned ; and after almost two years at Westborough, having 
become a skilled carpenter, he was released for the second time 
on probation. This was two and one-half years ago. From 
his home he writes : — 

August 18, 1906. 
Mr. W. Wheeler. 

Dear Sir : — Yours of the 15th inst. at hand, am very glad to see 
that I am not forgotten by the school, also by you. I am glad to 
say that I am getting along very well. I have been out two years 
and since then I have had no trouble of any kind. 

At present I am working at the Book Binding Co. I am clerk and 
timekeeper for above place and am getting a $12 salary. 

I am also studying for a position in the post office which will, I 
think be a good advancement for me if I pass exams. 

Kindly remember me to the trustees especially Mrs. Evans and 
Mr. Babb. 

Thanking you most kindly I remain 

Respectfully, L B . 

The history of C B illustrates another type of 

cases. At the age of twelve he was called a " ringleader in 
vice among boys ; " but at Berlin he was found a boy of excel- 

1 Misspelled for Wheeler. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 11 

lent disposition, with no trace of vice about him. After six: 
months in the school he went out to board, and did capitally. 
He had his own little garden patch, selling the produce to 
earn spending money, and from the proceeds he had his photo- 
graph taken to send back to his parents. They meanwhile had 
petitioned repeatedly, appealing to the Governor and to many 
others in authority, to get their boy home. When he was four- 
teen, having done well in his place for a year and a half, and 
his people having moved from their old locality and in many 

ways improved their conditions, it was decided to send C 

home on trial. On his journey back, in the train he spied one 
of the trustees, and presented himself, nicely dressed and as well 
appearing a boy as one need desire to see. About two months 
later this trustee went to visit him, and found an unkempt, 
rather tough-looking boy, who declared in a sullen tone that 
he was all right ; but presently, brightening, he asked if he could 
go back to his friends in the country when he wanted to. One 
stormy evening not long after he appeared at this trustee's 
house, draggled and wet to the skin, and told a miserable 
story of neglect and ill treatment. The clothes ho had brought 
home in a neat little grip had been given to his brother; his 
wages had been taken by his loafing father; not one stitch of 
clothe- had been given him, — not oven an overcoat for the 
bitter winter. Discouraged and angry, he begged to go bark 
to his country home. A new outfit provided from the YYost- 
borough storehouse so tilled his heart with delight that he 
insisted on wearing hi- overcoat in the house all the evening, 
and he could hardly be persuaded to undress when ho went to 
bed. Once back in the country, to be sure, lie was lonesome 
and asked to return again to the city, while the farmer who 
had formerly thought him a jewel "fears he Is not improved 
bj his experience at home.'' However, thing- gradually 
aed out, and a few months later he wrote : — 

M G 

I' \i: Mi;. Wheeler: — I received your letter and I am going to 

it to-night. I am living on a large Farm of about two hundred 

i. We have 20 head of cattle most Dutch Belted. They are very 

.. They are black on their head as far as their shoulders and 
a white Belt around black on the rump. 



12 TRUSTEP:S' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

I hope you will excuse my writing because I have a sore finger. 
We are all through haying and have been threshing grain. We will 
soon cut our corn and put it in the silo to give the cows in the winter 
green. And then go to the Fair at Topsham. 

This is all I have to say this time so goodby. 

From your little Friend C B . 

The tables showing the conduct of probationers during the 
entire period of their minority (see pages 58-60) are kept up 
from year to year, and are believed of value, not so much as 
an index of the school's efficiency (the basis upon which such 
figures may be computed is too various to allow a standard of 
comparison among different institutions), but as an occasion 
for reviewing one's own methods and reckoning with one's own 
successes and failures. A comparative table, recording the 
conduct of those w T ho have come of age within recent years, 
shows : — 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



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14 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

The year 1893 is chosen as a starting point in this table 
because this was the first year such figures were compiled. It 
was the poor showing of 1893 which led to the initiation of 
the visiting department, and to the immediate improvement in 
results above indicated. 

It is of interest to find that, of the whole number of boys who 
came of age within the year, 75 per cent, had never been re- 
turned to the school for any misconduct. Whoever may be 
interested in further details of this department will find profit- 
able reading in Mr. Wheeler's report, on page 42. 

The special appropriations last year were $22,000 for a new 
cottage, $4,000 to extend the subway and connect the heating 
system of this cottage and of the schoolhouse with the heating 
system in the laundry, and a further $1,400 to install bathing 
facilities in connection with the gymnasium, to provide a 
dough mixer in the bakery, and to provide toilet accommoda- 
tions in the Berlin farmhouse. The changes in the heating 
system are saving so much fuel that the outlay will be soon 
covered, and it is recommended that this centralized heating 
system be further extended. The cottage will be ready for 
occupation in the course of a few months. A further appro- 
priation of $2,500 for furniture and additional plumbing will 
be needed. Also, more land is needed. For years it has been 
necessary to hire an adjoining farm, and this is bad economy. 

The Lyman School opened the year with 330 inmates, and 
closed with 345. The whole number of individuals in the 
school during the year was 631, and the average number was 
338. 

The appropriations for the past eleven months were : for 
salaries, $32,510.46 ; for current expenses, $50,541.66 ; a total 
of $83,052.12 for running the institution. To be expended in 
behalf of probationers : for tuition fees to towns, $750 ; for 
visitation, $8,250; for boarding, $5,000. The expenditure in 
behalf of probationers (for fourteen months) was $17,083.84. 
The total expenditure in behalf of the institution, Oct. 1, 1905, 
to Nov. 30, 1906, was $100,968.66. The per capita cost of the 
institution was $4.90, and $1,136.86 was turned into the State 
treasury, making a net per capita of $4.84. The per capita cost 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 15 

of Berlin was $2.93 ; the per capita cost of visitation was 18.1 
cents per week, and of the whole body of boys in the school 
approximately $1.40 per week. 

The superintendent, Mr. Theodore F. Chapin, is about to 
terminate his more than eighteen years of service. The history 
of the Lyman School during his administration is a story of 
unresting advance along lines now universally accepted, but in 
which he has always been a pioneer. The institution as it 
stands to-day is his creation, and he lays down his work having 
won the esteem of all who have been near enough to appreciate 
the integrity, the modest} r and the rare unselfishness of his 
character. For the past six months he has held his position 
at a great sacrifice to himself. His successor, Mr. Elmer L. 
Coffeen, will relieve him soon after the new vear. 



16 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 



STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS AT 
LANCASTER. 

If the people of Massachusetts knew more about the State 
Industrial School for Girls, on the one hand, more girls would 
have reason to be grateful for that experience in their lives 
which has taken them out of the world of following the path 
of least resistance in their pleasure-loving natures, and put 
them into an environment of wholesome work and real affection ; 
and, on the other hand, the community would become more 
responsible toward girls leading loose lives, and would see 
how many of them, under the right care and guidance become 
useful and happy women, — a peg of strength instead of a 
vanishing point of corruption. It has been our experience to 
see this happen so often that we know it to be true. It makes 
us feel that every effort in the direction of character-building 
is worth while ; for not only does the girl who is evidently 
meant for better things respond, but sometimes the girl whom 
one would suppose had every reason from inheritance and en- 
vironment to be a demoralized member of society, becomes a 
self-respecting, useful woman. 

Of the 90 girls who came of age this year, 73 per cent, are 
living respectably. 1 In what way does the State Industrial 
School take girls out of inconsequent evil living, and start 
them on that happy life of trying to be respectable, helpful 
women ? 

The school is in the town of Lancaster, one of our most 
beautiful New England villages. As one leaves the station at 
Clinton every step brings one into greater peace and beauty, 
through fields and meadows, wooded hills and pine trees, with 
an occasional farm, until one reaches the school. The school 
is situated in a natural park ; the brick cottages are sufficiently 
set apart to give a homelike look to things. Windows and 
doors are open. The girls are walking about, gardening or 
playing games. The superintendent's house is an old colonial 

1 Not counting the 5 who are mentally deficient. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 17 

wooden house, literally a home ; for, in spite of the office and 
the immense amount of work passing through it, one is always 
a guest there, and feels the privacy of a home. To have such 
a home on the grounds affords an ideal for the girls. 

The whole atmosphere of the school is one of work and 
order, and of having things pleasing to the eye. Our super- 
intendent, Mrs. Morse, embodies these qualities, — an efficient, 
orderly mind, fully mistress of any situation that may arise, 
and knowing that beauty and the graces of life go far toward 
rousing self-respect, and make for elevation of character. The 
girls lead a simple, wholesome country life of early rising and 
simple living. We put great effort into teaching the domes- 
tic arts. To accomplish a well-made simple cotton dress, the 
making of good bread, the nice care of floors and lamps, are 
worthy accomplishments for any one ; but for a girl who has 
become lawless, following her impulses only, these accom- 
plishments are great ones, and it is an inspiring thing to see 
the look on a girl's face who has really reached a standard of 
work well done. It is order out of chaos, and it is the tirst 
step toward the building of character. Another wonderful 
thing to see is a girl who comes to the school and stands aloof 
from every other girl in the cottage, her self-indulgence and her 
bad temper having made her entirely lonely. Her complaint 
is, " The girls hate me, they all pick on me." A few months 
later the same girl will say, "I have learned to get on fine 
with the girls ; I like them all." Here again one of the greatest 
and most essential things in their lives is started, — the living 
with others and joining together, each taking her part. It is 
of infinite value, but sometimes it takes a year or more to 
Learn. Teaching girls to live with others and the accomplish- 
ment of the domestic arts stand them in good stead when 
tliev go out into the world. 

By long experience we have beeo able to plan a course of 
domestic work covering a year to a year and a half, during 
which time, on the whole, we consider it desirable that a girl 
should stay in the school. Heretofore this work has all been 

done in each cottage Under sufficiently homely conditions to 
prepare the girl for work in the home of a country town, where 
she is likely to be placed. Aus the best bread making and the 



18 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

best washing and ironing are useful accomplishments in any 
home, we have added to our more primitive domestic course a 
special course covering a month each in these two arts. These 
courses are given in a small building used exclusively for this 
purpose, and taken charge of by expert teachers. Some of the 
bread and clothes go to each cottage, thereby raising the stand- 
ard of bread making and washing and ironing in the cottages. 
In education, two things have always to be considered : high 
standards on the one hand ; and, on the other, accomplishment 
of the highest standard that a girl maybe able to attain. In a 
school like ours, where the girls have had little if any previous 
training, the accent must always be put on the highest standard 
that any particular girl may attain. Our school has always 
stood for this, — the inner growth of each girl, with reasonable 
attainment of performance according to each one's capacity. 
In line with this is the classification of one cottage for feeble- 
minded and backward girls. Here is a group of girls classified 
according to their mental capacity, and not according to their 
experience of evil as is the practice in other cottages. For 
example, a girl is sent to us with a record showing a large ex- 
perience of evil. This girl is put into the cottage with the girls 
who have had the largest similar experience ; but, if found to 
be feeble-minded, she is transferred to our cottage for feeble- 
minded girls. It is typical of these girls that they neither look 
forward nor backward, — the present is all with them ; they 
take on the atmosphere that they are in, and consequently cease 
to be a demoralizing influence. The occasional girl who after 
trial in this cottage proves herself harmful to the other girls 
we send to our cottage at Bolton. The household of feeble- 
minded girls retains its pupils longer than others, for here 
all the processes have to be written large and go slowly ; in 
this way they often become excellent workers. Meanwhile, 
they are all under the observation of the physician, and those 
whom he will certify to be custodial cases are taken before a 
probate judge for commitment to the Massachusetts School for 
the Feeble-minded. Five girls have been so committed within 
the year, and as many others are under consideration for com- 
mitment. Even so, we still have a number of girls who with 
care and protection are good, lovable girls and hard workers, 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 19 

but have neither the foresight nor the steadfastness to protect 
them against themselves out in the world. What is to become 
of these girls at twenty-one when they have been tried out and 
found wanting ? It is very severe to such girls , and demoralizing 
to the world, to have them at large, irresponsible and excitable 
victims of the first evil person that comes along. As yet these 
girls come under no recognized classification. A joint com- 
mittee, made up of representatives from the Massachusetts 
School for the Feeble-minded, from those who direct the special 
classes in the public schools, from the judiciary and from our 
school, might be formed, to consider the welfare of this group 
of girls. 

The rest of the girls are classified according to their expe- 
rience of evil, in the different cottages. We have one cottage 
at Bolton, two miles distant, for our older girls; at present 
17 of these girls have been tried out, but have proved them- 
selves too self-indulgent to withstand temptation. Eleven 
others have been sent to Bolton before being tried out, some 
on account of the most serious record of wrong-doing before 
their commitment, and others on account of the demoralizing 
influence they exerted at Lancaster. And yet these girls, who 
are really young women, most of them over eighteen years 
of age, will surprisingly often do well on another trial in the 
world. 

As the girls in our cottages are classified according to their 
experience of evil, we have never attempted a central school ; 
but the ungraded classes in the different cottages are a sore 
tax upon the teachers, and prove very unsatisfactory in spite 
of the devoted efforts of our supervisor. The girls are in the 
Schoolroom three hours caeli day. In any cottage some of 
the 25 girls can neither read nor write ; others are ready for 
the high school and more advanced work. One can easily 
Bee the impossibility of keeping up a good tone in such an un- 
graded class. To meet this difficulty, Mrs. Morse has arranged 
to have a special teacher for the advanced pupils in our much- 
used chapel. This will be a help, bul we need an additional 
teacher for the girls who are learning to read and write. We 
Should make sure that all the girls who are sent out should 
be well grounded in the three " hVs." 



20 TKUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

For a long time we have felt the need of an assembly hall 
and gymnasium. We have never been able to have real sys- 
tematic exercise and games, but merely limited exercises of 
the body in a small space. The chapel, which has imperfectly 
served for these purposes as well as for many others, is much 
outgrown. With our girls, where the pull in the wrong direc- 
tion has been so great, every effort should be made to develop 
a high standard of normal physical condition. We give the 
girls more systematic care and closer observation physically 
than formerly. We keep fuller records, and realize, as they 
do in the public schools, how much more can be done mentally 
and morally if the integrity of the senses and the condition of 
the body is sound. We also realize that character is the most 
powerful factor in health. 

Sundays the girls are sent to the various churches in the 
village. They love to go, and it is a break in the isolation 
of institution life. We feel that even for a few hours it is a 
wholesome thing for them to feel themselves part of the out- 
side world. 

The trustees are entrusted with full responsibility for the 
girls from their commitment until they have reached twenty- 
one years of age. One has only to see the way this really works 
to know what a power for helpfulness it is. It means that 
from six to seven years, at the most critical age, some one is 
standing with the girl wherever she may be, responsible with 
her for her growth and character. 

The probation department receives the girl from the school ; 
the point as to when a girl is ready to leave the school is 
a most important one, requiring of the superintendent real 
knowledge of the girl, and great discretion. Immediate action 
in sending a girl out when she is ready is not only vital to the 
girl herself, but to the tone of the school. It prevents de- 
moralization, and keeps the school a living organization of 
growth, upon which the morale of an institution must always 
depend. The school sends the girls out as fully prepared as 
the limitations of an institution life will permit. Once out in 
the world the girl's true calibre shows itself, and the slow, uphill 
fight to develop what is best in a girl in the face of tempta- 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 21 

tion has begun. We are sending more girls directly to places 
this year than formerly, believing that the continuance of out- 
side control, although to a lesser degree, makes the break 
from the institution to the freedom of their own home more 
gradual. Girls feel more responsible to strangers. In the 
relaxation of their own home they do not always feel obliged 
to do their best, consequently, we send them among strangers 
first ; but too much stress cannot be put on the quality of the 
home we first put them into. 

Of the 90 girls coming of age during the past year, more 
than half had been guilty of serious offences against good 
morals, and yet nearly three-quarters of these are now living 
respectably. The report of the superintendent of probationers, 
on page 92, gives a graphic account of the growth, through 
struggle and temptation in the world, of some girls, who made 
a most unpromising start. This record testifies to the efficient 
way in which the initial training received in the school has 
been supplemented by the probation department, whose salaried 
visitors, chosen and already well trained by their superintendent 
to meet their problems thoughtfully, and then to act intelli- 
gently, have set a high standard of work which can be main- 
tained only by adding new recruits of the right stuff to appreciate 
it. The other day one of the returned girls said : k 'I tell the 
girls they never will have a better friend than Miss Dewson. 
She has done everything for me. She always knows the way 
tilings are." Another visitor has often been spoken of by the 
parents with greatest admiration. This high standard of work 
18 also felt by the volunteer visitors, Avho are in frequent corre- 
spondence with Miss Dewson, and who gather once or twice 
B year in conferences, at which their isolated experiences are 
brought within the sphere of larger principles. These volun- 
teers from all over the State come to know what our school 
Btands for. They can be a means of making sacred to the com- 
munity the lives of our girls. There is a large number of 
young men who respect women, and who never would go 
near a woman to harm her if they thought of her as a woman 
who might lead a useful, helpful life. This knowledge would 
greatly diminish immoral self-indulgence on their part. We 
hope the day will come when the special visitors will be backed 



22 TRUSTEES' REPORT IXDUST'L SCH'L. [Dec. 1906. 

by the people of the town in realizing that kindness and rever- 
ence for the unfortunate as well as for the fortunate is what is 
really going to raise the town's moral tone. 

A volunteer visitor, formerly a trustee, was asked by Dr. 
Devine if she would write out how this probation work was 
done. She said, " I shall tell him that my motto is, 'A soul 
for a soul.' " 

The special appropriations last year were : §5,000 for a 
storehouse; $1,500 for repairs and improvements in Elm Cot- 
tage ; §1,200 for a silo ; and $1,000 for additional furnishings 
in the hospital and for equipping the laundry and bakery. 

The special appropriations which will be asked are : a new 
cottage, to meet increased commitments ; a gymnasium, either 
in connection with the chapel or in a separate building ; small 
heaters in the several cottages to afford a better supply of hot 
water for bathing purposes ; and a sewer bed, as recommended 
by the State Board of Health. Eigures for the above will be 
ready when called for by the Legislature. 

The school opened the year with 209 inmates, and closed 
with 221 ; the average number was 214. The appropriation 
for carrving on the school for eleven months was : for salaries, 
$20,091.84 ; for other current expenses, 826,845 ; and $10,751 
for the probation department. For the fourteen months cov- 
ered in this report the sum of §56,582.74 was expended in 
behalf of the institution and $13,259.13 in behalf of the girls 
outside, the per capita cost being $4.33 (net) for the former 
and 51 cents for the latter. This gives an average per capita 
of SI. 77 for the whole number of oirls in the school's care. 



Appendix A. 



TRUST FUNDS 



LYMAN AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS. 



1905-1906. 



TKUST FUNDS OF LYMAN AND INDUS- 
TKIAL SCHOOLS. 



[Held by the Treasurer and Receiver-General, under chapter 407 of the Acts of 1906.] 

Lyman School, Lyman Fund. 



Cash. 



Total Fund. 



Receipts in 1906. 
C. G. Washburn, treasurer of trustees, 
Income of investments, 
Securities matured, 



Total cash receipts, 
Amount of fund, . 



Payments in 
Lyman School for Boys, 
Securities purchased, . 



1906 



Cash on hand Nov. 30, 1906, 
Amount of fund Nov. 30, 1906, 



.$1,229 87 
. 26,382 98 



Present Investments. 
Boston & Albany Railroad, certificate of stock 

Athol bond, 

Citizens National Bank of Worcester, certificate 

of stock, 

Easthampton note, 

Everett bonds, 

First National Bank of Worcester, 

Norfolk County note, 

Northern Pacific & Great Northern Railroad 

bond, 

Norwood notes, 

WorceflteT Trust Company, certificate of stock 

Cash on hand Nov. 30, 1906, 



$2,612 18 

2,956 72 

22,646 65 



$28,215 55 



27,612 85 



$602 70 



$300 00 
2,000 00 

4,000 00 

6,000 00 

6,000 00 

100 00 

1,382 98 

5,000 00 

10,000 00 

400 00 



$34,058 83 
2,956 72 



$37,015 55 



1,229 87 



$35,785 68 



$35,182 98 
602 70 

$35,785 68 



2$ 



TRUST FUNDS, 



[Dec, 



Lyman School, Lyman Trust Fund. 



Cash. 



Total Fund. 



Receipts in 1906, 
C. G. Washburn, treasurer of trustees, 

Payments in 1906. 
No transactions. 
Balance Nov. 30, 1906, 

Present Investments. 
Chicago Junction and Union Stock Yards Com- 
pany bonds, 

Boston & Albany Railroad Company stock, 
New London & Northern Railroad Company 
stock, 



|5,000 00 
14,000 00 

1,000 00 



$20,000 00 



$20,000 00 



$20,000 00 



Income Lyman School, Lyman Trust Fund. 



Receipts in 1906. 
C. G. Washburn, treasurer of trustees, 
Income of investments, 

Payments in 1906. 
No transactions. 
Balance Nov. 30, 1906, . 



Present Investment. 
Cash on hand Nov. 30, 1906, 



$22 50 
756 11 



$778 61 
$778 61 
$778 61 



Lyman School, Lamb Fund. 



Receipts in 1906. 
C. G. Washburn, treasurer of trustees, 
Securities matured, .... 



Total cash receipts, 
Amount of fund, . 



Payments in 1906. 
Securities purchased, . 



Amount of fund Nov. 30, 1906, . 

Present Investment. 
Athol bond, ..... 



$201 78 
798 22 



$1,000 00 



$1,000 00 



$1,000 00 



$1,000 00 

$1,000 00 
$1,000 00 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



27 



Income Lyman School, Lamb Fund. 





Cash. 


Total Fund. 


Receipts in 1906. 
C. G. Washburn, treasurer of trustees, 

Income of investments, 

Securities matured, 


$164 06 

753 51 

1,266 27 


$1,430 32 
753 51 


Total cash receipts, 

Amount of fund, 

Payments in 1906. 
Securities purchased, 


$2,183 83 
100 00 


$2,183 83 


Cash on hand, 

Amount of fund, 

Present Investment. 
Boston & Albany Railroad stock, 1 share, . 
Cash on hand Nov. 30, 1906, .... 


$2,083 83 

$100 00 
2,083 83 


$2,183 83 
$2,183 83 







Income Industrial School, Lamb Fund. 




Receipts in 1906. 
C. G. Washburn, treasurer of trustees, 

Income of investment, 

Securities matured, 


$3 18 
21 99 
87 02 


$90 20 
21 99 


Payments in 1906. 
No transactions. 

Cash on hand Nov. 30, 1906, .... 
Amount of fund Nov. 30, 1906, .... 

Present Investment. 
Cash on hand Nov. 30, 1906, .... 


$112 19 
$112 19 


$112 19 

$112 19 
$112 19 



Industrial School, Lamb Fund. 



Receipts in 1906. 
C. (r. Washburn, treasurer of trustees, 

Payments in 1906. 

No transactions. 

Balance Nov. 30, 1906 

Present Investment. 
America]] Telegraph and Telephone Company 
bond, 




$1,000 00 
$1,000 00 
$1,000 00 



28 



TRUST FUNDS. 



[Dec. 



Industrial School, Fay Fund. 





Cash. 


Total Fund. 


Receipts in 1906. 
C. G. Washburn, treasurer of trustees, 

Transfer from income, 

Securities matured, . . . . . 


$25 00 
975 00 


$975 00 

25 00 


Payments in 1906. 
No transactions. 

Cash on hand Nov. 30, 1906, .... 
Amount of fund Nov. 30, 1906, .... 

Present Investment. 
Cash on hand, 


$1,000 00 
$1,000 00 


$1,000 00 

$1,000 00 
$1,000 00 



Income Industrial School, Fay Fund. 



Receipts in 1906. 
Income of investments, 



Payments in 1906. 
No transactions. 
Balance Nov. 30, 1906, 



Present Investment. 
Cash on hand Nov. 30, 1906, 



$17 74 

$17 74 
$17 74 



ARTHUR B. CHAPIN, 

Treasurer and Receiver- General of the Commonwealth 



UJ lU.WSSUUmi3CM 

Lyman Fund Expenditures, Oct. 


1, 1905, to Nov. 30, 1906. 


1905. 




Nov. 7. 


Redemption of token money, $100 00 


7. 


Prizes to cottages, 








6 00 


7. 


Band instruction, . 








25 00 


7. 


Honor grade badges, 








1 00 


7. 


Honor grade badges, . 








21 79 


Dec. 1. 


Redemption of token money, 








100 00 


1. 


Prizes to cottages, 








13 00 


1. 


Band instruction, . 








25 00 


31. 


Christmas celebration, . 








56 56 


31. 


Gospel services, . 








28 00 



Amount carried forward. 



$376 35 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



Amount brought forward, 



1905. 




Dec. 


31. 


Honor grade expenses, 




31. 


Lecture, 




31. 


Book, . 




31. 


Entertainment, 




31. 


Band instruction, . 




31. 


Books, .... 




31. 


Games, .... 




31. 


Skates, .... 




31. 


Redemption of token money 




31. 


Honor grade expenses, 




31. 


Lecture, 


1906. 




Jan. 


31. 


Band instruction, . 




31. 


Banners, 




31. 


Books, .... 




31. 


Lecture, 




81. 


Prizes to cottages, 


Feb. 


23. 


Band instruction, . 




23. 


Redemption of token money 




23. 


Banners, 




23. 


Book, .... 


Mar. 


30. 


Gospel services, . 




30. 


Redemption of token money 




30. 


Band instruction, . 




30. 


Honor grade expenses, . 




30. 


Preparation of brick laying, 


May 


5. 


Redemption of token money 




, r ). 


Band instruction, . 




5. 


Prizes to cottages, 




5. 


Honor grade expenses, 




5. 


Pennant, 




22. 


Honor grade expenses, 




22. 


Games, .... 




22. 


Prizes to cottages, 




22. 


Redemption of token money 




22. 


Band instruction, . 




22. 


Lectures, 


■ Jun< 




Prizes to cottages, 




30. 


Band instruction, . 




80. 


Gospel services 






Lectures, 




80. 


Redemption of token money 


July 


• r ). 


Fourth of .Inly, 




5. 


Honor grade expenses, 




5. 


Prizes to COttageS, 



Amount carried forward, 





29 


. $376 


35 


10 


73 


10 


00 


2 


50 


10 


00 


25 


00 


32 81 


5 


63 


9 


15 


100 00 


10 


55 


10 00 


25 


00 


4 00 


2 


07 


10 


00 


14 


00 


25 00 


100 00 


4 00 


24 


37 


24 


00 


100 00 


25 00 


1 


80 


143 


95 


100 


00 


25 


00 


3 


00 


14 


75 


9 


50 


17 


01 


7 


54 


6 


00 


100 00 


25 00 


20 


00 


3 00 


25 


00 


24 


00 


20 


III) 


100 


00 


86 


60 


7 


20 


8 


00 


$1,700 44 



30 TRUST FUNDS. [Dec. 1906. 

Amount brought forward, f 1,700 44 

1900. 

Aug. 4. Prizes to cottages, 5 00 

4. Honor grade expenses, 1 30 

4. Fourth of July, . . . , . . . . . . 10 00 

4. Redemption of token money, . . . . . 100 00 

4. Band instruction 25 00 

4. Gospel services, 6 00 

Sept. 6. Band instruction, . . . . . . . 25 00 

6. Musical instrument, 7 50 

6. Redemption of token money, . . . . . 100 00 

6. Prizes to cottages, 9 00 

Oct. 5. Honor grade expenses, 3 20 

5. Redemption of token money, 100 00 

5. Prizes to cottages, ....... 5 00 

5. Band instruments, 100 00 

5. Band instruction, 25 00 

5. Honor grade expenses, 13 75 

5. Lecture, 10 00 

Nov. 10. School building balcony, . . . . . . 173 36 

10. Redemption of token money, 100 00 

10. Prizes to cottages, 6 00 

10. Swimming pool, 101 06 

10. Band instruction, 25 00 

10. Lecture, 5 00 



$2,656 61 



T. F. CHAPIN, 

Superintendent. 

Industrial School, Lamb Fund, Expenditures, Oct. 1, 1905, to 

Nov. 30, 1906. 
Celebration, Christmas, December, 1905, . . . ... $50 00 

Celebration, Fourth of July, 1906, 25 00 



$75 00 



FANNIE F. MORSE, 

Superintendent. 



Appendix B. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 

OF THE 

LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS 

AT 

WESTBOROUGH. 

1905-1906. 



SUPEKESTTEKDENT'S KEPORT. 1 



The statistics given in the subjoined tables are for fourteen 
months, but for purposes of comparison with former years they 
involve changes so slight that in most cases the difference of 
time may be disregarded or the allowance for the two months 
made without inconvenience. 

The 200 new commitments for the twelve months ending 
Sept. 30, 1906, are more than for any previous year, and the 
daily average has been greater by 2 than for the preceding 
year. The daily average given in my first report, 1888, was 
127.24, against 338.13 for the period just closed. 

Table No. 9, page 63, shows a diminution of over three 
months in the average time spent here by boys who have been 
placed out during the year. This does not indicate any mate- 
rial changes in the character or conduct of boys, as appears 
from the fact that boys who were placed out for the first time, 
exclusive of the little boys boarded out from Berlin, have spent 
about as much time in winning their probation as in the previ- 
ous year. 

Table No. 6, page 61, shows 1 boy received from the Juve- 
nile Court of Boston. The papers giving information about 
home and antecedents of the boy were models, covering about 
everything one would like to know about an incoming boy. 

The physical well-being of the school for the year past has 
been good. The progress and esprit, despite some annoying 
and trying incidents, have been fairly satisfactory. 

The school grades have done commendable work. The new 
principal has the situation in hand, and is making progress. 
The tentative school program inaugurated a year ago last 
August was abandoned at the middle of the winter, as on the 
whole not so good as the old plan of manual training and trades 

1 For fourteen months, ending Nov. 30, 1<K)6. 



34 SUPT.'S REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

classes in the forenoon and the graded school in the afternoon 
and evening. 

The Sunday program has been completely changed. Through 
the kindness and courtesy of the pastors and churches of West- 
borough, sittings for all the boys at the morning services were 
offered, and since August the boys have been attending church 
in Westborough, — the Catholics at St. Lukes, and the rest in 
turn at each of the other churches. The boys have been made 
welcome everywhere, and the pastors have made special effort 
to have something to say which would interest the boys. In 
the afternoon separate Sunday-schools for Catholics and non- 
Catholics are held, after which a general school program, 
appropriate to Sunday but having no religious tone, is in 
operation. 

More emphasis has been put upon the language work of the 
grades, with excellent result and promise of still better. There 
has been progress in the correlation of work of the special 
teachers with the grade work, particularly in the drawing. 
Attention has been paid to improving the text-book service. 

The work in music has been pushed by Mrs. Kimball with 
her accustomed vigor and success, and it has exercised a decid- 
edly elevating effect upon the school as a whole. 

As to gymnastic work, I cannot do better than to quote a 
little from the instructor's report to me. Mr. Wilson says : 
" As the school program is arranged, every boy in the school is 
receiving two three-quarter-hour periods of gymnastics a week. 
Nearly 300 boys have been measured this year, and of those 
measured not one has failed to show a marked improvement. 
The greatest improvement, however, has been in the mental 
development, especially in the four middle grades. ... In 
the corrective department 9 cases of curvature have been 
treated successfully. . . . The military drill of the past year 
was more encouraging than heretofore." 

The manual training has reached a larger number this year 
than in any previous year, the total amounting to 310. The 
department has fully sustained the high tone by which it has 
been characterized in the past. What this is, a line from the 
annual report of the sloyd section will indicate : * * The teach- 
ers . . . have tried to teach the spirit of the law which giveth 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 35 

life." How this learning to shape wood may shape a life is 
told a little further on in the same report: ''One day last 
summer a boy over twenty years of age said to me, ' It is what 
got into my soul to do and be that has helped me.' " 

The advanced manual training section, besides the regular 
instruction, has accomplished a large amount of work of con- 
siderable industrial value, estimated at over $700. 

The carpentry section has done exceedingly well. A con- 
siderable number of boys showing aptitude for mechanical 
pursuits have had a thorough training in cabinet and general 
carpenter work. The class has made, of well-finished quar- 
tered-oak furniture, over $1,200 worth, besides doing a large 
amount of general repair work for the institution. Its well- 
equipped shop is a busy and interesting place. Under the 
versatile teacher, Mr. Wilcox, here assemble daily the band for 
an hour and a half of practice. It has grown until it contains 
56 members. Seven clarinets, a piccolo and three more slide 
trombones have diversified and improved the quality of the 
work. It promises to be the best band we have yet had. 

The trades instruction has been further enlarged by the 
employment of Mr. V. E. Backus to teach masonry and steam 
piping. Mr. Backus is a westerner who knows how to do 
many things, and particularly how to get boys interested in 
their work. Under his instruction and direction have been 
built the subway extension to the new cottage now in process 
of erection and the extension to the school building:, making in 
all, including the one begun last year, over 600 feet of heating 
Subway, ."> feet wide and 7 feet high. Aside from the value of 
tin- work to 25 or more boys as elementary instruction in a 
useful trade, the actual net value to the institution, after de- 
ducting the amount of the appropriation, is not less than s.~>, <)<><>, 
Compared with the price for which it could have been let on 

contract. These same boys have done under direction more 
than 2,500 feet of -team piping, at a considerable profit to them- 
Belves and the institution. While it will be impossible t<> have 
e\ ery \ ear so much good instruction material- at hand for these 
trade- a- Buch special work as these heating changes have afforded, 
there will always be much repair work for th.- institution requir- 
ing such material-, and the necessary and instructive labor of 



36 SUPT.'S EEPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

using this in making repairs can be supplemented by a regular 
daily lesson planned especially to cover the whole course in these 
trades of steam fitting and masonry. Such an arrangement, 
properly carried out, would be even more profitable to the 
learner than the present wholly practical and productive work. 

The printing class, under its present efficient instructor, has 
demonstrated its usefulness both as a trades institute and as a 
mind-awakener. The classes are two in number, and four hours 
are given to each class. The class room is especially well 
arranged, and equipped for 16 pupils at a time. The wants of 
the school grades and of the institution, together with the pub- 
lication of the two periodicals, give good material for instruc- 
tion. The instructor recommends that all pupils in his section 
have eighteen months' instruction, and that as far as practicable 
these be boys without home and friends. 

There is a considerable amount of electrical work constantly 
to be done, and this affords practice, under the instruction of a 
competent electrician, Mr. Irving A. Nourse, for three or four 
boys a year, some of whom become quite proficient in plain 
electrical wiring. 

The industries of the school furnish much hand training, and 
the attempt is made to systematize them, and as far as may be 
select boys to whom it is likely to be of commercial value in 
the future. But this is not allowed to interfere with a boy's 
course in manual training, elementary or advanced, the band, 
or a more skilled trade if he is of ability enough for the same. 

In the laundry 39 boys have been employed during the past 
year, under the direction of a cottage master, Mr. W. C. 
Morton. About 60 per cent, of these have manifested a marked 
interest in the work. Ten boys had instruction in all the dif- 
ferent branches of the work. The laundry is called upon to 
handle 360,000 pieces in twelve months. 

In the tailor shop, also under a cottage master, Mr. N. A. 
Wiggin, 25 boys were trained. Ten of these showed sufficient 
interest and made good enough progress to place them in the 
apprentice class for journeyman workers. They made up 350 
suits for Sunday wear besides over 4,000 other garments of 
various kinds, and have done the repairing of clothes for the 
institution. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 37 

In the shoe shop, managed by Mr. N. A. Hennessey, another 
cottage master, 31 boys were trained. Twelve of these acquired 
skill to make a shoe from start to finish. It has been the aim 
so to equip and run the shop that a boy might be fitted to take 
a good place in a shoe shop when he should go out. 

A class in house painting, conducted by a cottage master, 
Mr. C. A. Keeler, four hours a day for the past year, has usually 
contained about 8 members, and has been fully occupied with 
outside or inside painting. 

The general kitchen and bakery have been combined in one 
large room, 30 by 60 feet, with two large ovens at one end and 
an adequate number of steam kettles at the other. An elec- 
trically driven dough mixer has just been installed, in which 
all the mixing, raising and kneading are done, no hand touching 
the dough until it is cut up and placed in pans ready for the 
oven. From an economical standpoint this is quite a gain in a 
complete use of the flour, and from the sanitary side a very 
decided gain in avoiding the risk of so much hand manipula- 
tion. Fourteen boys are under training daily, with a competent 
cook, Mr. Trask, as teacher. A varied bill of fare for over 
400 people gives considerable scope and practice in the very 
useful art of cooking. 

The farm training reaches about 130 boys during a large 
part of the year ; all the boys get a taste of it some time dur- 
ing the year. Two successful dairying classes were conducted 
during last winter, with 8 pupils in each. The care of stock, 
the milking, feeding, grooming of over 60 cows and the daily 
care of the big cow stable fall to a cottage master and 20 of 
bis boys. The appearance of the cows and the sweet cleanli- 
D68S of the barn attest the thoroughness of the instruction. 

A large, successful and profitable poultry yard is conducted 
by another cottage master, in which a small number of boys, 
about 6 at a time, gei practice and skill. The season of incu- 
bation is one of great interest to the boys. 

The greenhouse, under Mi-. Lasselle, the master of Willow 
Park cot (age, promises excellent results and good training for 
• s boys, besides furnishing material for instruction for a much 
larger number. 

1 In 1 possibilities of agriculture as a means of instruction and 



38 SUPT.'S REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

training for such boys as these are very great, and as yet have 
scarcely been touched. I should like to see it more fully 
incorporated in our course of instruction. The showing for 
the farm production this year is excellent, thanks to Mr. Cock- 
burn's planning and vigorous work. Abundance of fodder was 
stored for our large stock of over 70 head, and fruit and vege- 
tables adequate to the wants of the institution. The net gain 
on the balance sheet is considerably larger than usual. 

The teaching of trades, alluded to in last year's report as of 
A^alue to certain classes of boys, has been fairly inaugurated, 
and it is the purpose to strengthen it considerably during the 
coming year. 

The Berlin branch for little boys was deprived of the services 
of its foster-mother, Mrs. Emily Warner, the 1st of November 
last year. Mrs. Warner organized the work there ten years 
ago, and trained not only the little boys, but her assistants, 
Mr. and Mrs. Dudley. Her presence and influence were a 
constant benediction, that abides, I think, with her assistants, 
who took up and are carrying the work successfully forward. 

The number sent over during the fourteen months just ended 
was 68 against 50 the preceding year ; the consequence has 
been to press the boarding out, so that the average time spent 
by boys at the Berlin branch has been reduced from ^ve months 
to three and one-half. Of the 42 placed out, 10 were returned 
to the main school at Westborough. The average number at 
Berlin has been slightly under 20. The atmosphere of the 
place as a home for little boys is all one could well desire. 

My relations with the department of visitation have been 
most pleasant, and my high opinion of its work remains un- 
changed. It is really the most important single department of 
the w T hole work, and without it the whole would be a practical 
failure. 

There are many knotty problems in connection with the work, 
but the one which causes the school the greatest embarrassment 
is the return of the old boy who has degenerated into a tough, 
or become wholly indifferent to the noble ideals he may have 
entertained as he left the school. Some cases undoubtedly can 
be cared for better by sending them to the Massachusetts Re- 
formatory than by any other method, but there is a goodly 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 39 

number of others for whom more time is needed. To leave such 
probationers in the open community until they have committed 
some crime which shall put them in the penitentiary, because 
there is doubt as to what further the school can do for them or 
because of the fear of their contaminating effect upon those 
at the school who have not yet won a probationary release, 
would be an unworthy policy. A wise plan, it seems to me, 
would be to put such returned boys as need a considerable 
detention in a cottage by themselves, with separate instruction, 
both literary and industrial, and to employ people of the highest 
character and skill to teach and influence them. If it were a 
difficult case in surgery, one would not set an amateur at work 
on it, nor would one be deterred from acting because there 
might not be a successful outcome in all cases. It seems to me 
that in dealing with these difficult boys one needs to have the 
courage of one's logic, and it is to be hoped that the community 
may have the patience and discrimination to await the legiti- 
mate outcome of such efforts. To carry out such a plan with 
the best prospect of success demands additional land and build- 
ings, separated somewhat from the present plant ; such premises 
to be devoted absolutely and wholly to these returned boys. 
This problem of the wise training and care of the wayward boy 
returned for cause seems to me not only the knotty one, but 
the one now most pressing for an intelligent and consistent 
solution. Meantime, the situation is being dealt with earnestly. 
At present, complete separation is not practicable, but an at- 
tempt in thai direction is being made, and the industrial 
training is baying considerable attention. 

The new oottage has made good progress towards completion. 
It i- being thoroughly well done by the contractor, Mr. Hurley. 
Twenty-five hundred dollars will be needed to furnish and equip 
it, and should be in hand as soon as possible, as the cottage i- 
sadly needed. 

The heating changes, tor which appropriation was made last 

winter, ha\ e been BO tar completed and tested that the month 
of November showed a saving of more than s_'u(> over Novem- 
ber of last year. Besides the added comfort and efficiency 

which the changes afford, the economy will more than cover 
the outlay inside of three years. 



40 SUPT.'S REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

The subways could with profit be extended to take in the 
heating of the three buildings on the hill above the adminis- 
tration building, — the greenhouse, hospital and Maple cottage. 
This would entail the construction of 1,200 or 1,400 feet more 
of subway ; but, as the one built has been done so cheaply, this 
would not cause a formidable outlay. The cost would be more 
than met by the fuel saving in three to five years. The boiler 
and special apparatus already installed for the vacuum system 
are ample for additions suggested. The pipes conveying 
steam for the buildings on the hill have been under ground 
for twenty years, and in the nature of things cannot last much 
longer ; which furnishes a motive for considering the construc- 
tion of these subway extensions in the immediate future. Two 
years would be needed to do the work, with such boy help as 
we have available. 

Our water supply is not satisfactory for ordinary use, and 
is wholly inadequate for fire emergencies. I would suggest 
either a water tower on the hill above Gables cottage, or a 
capacious storage tank in the ground near the power house. 
In either case a large and efficient pump is needed. For fire 
protection, either a well-equipped fire department, manned by 
employees of the institution, should be instituted, or some 
arrangement made with the very efficient fire department of 
Westborough for their services. In the latter case the fire- 
alarm service would have to be extended from the town to the 
institution. 

The history of another year in the use of the loyalty prize 
shows that in all the cottages it was a considerable check on 
the runaway propensity by enlisting the interest of the major- 
ity of the boys against it, and their influence and co-operation 
to prevent it. Did it prevent or even diminish the actual 
number? A categorical answer might discredit the loyalty 
prize ; but it must be borne in mind that what is sought is the 
exercise of the will on the part of the boy in law-keeping, in- 
stead of making the way in which restraints are applied an 
incentive to law-breaking. The prize is not a panacea for 
running away, but simply one of many motives to which ap- 
peal may be made. I do not call the record of the result bad. 
One cottage had a clean twelve months without runaways ; two 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 41 

others, of nine months ; five, from three to six months ; and 
the two others, although they tried, did not succeed in getting 
the necessary three-months record without an attempt, more 
or less successful, to run away. The honor or Sir Galahad 
class has been continued this year ; 138 entered, 56 attained 
the second degree and 30 the first. Twelve honor trips were 
taken by the first and second grades : two to Wachusett Moun- 
tain ; one to Wachusett dam ; one to Concord and Lexington ; 
one to visit a battleship at Boston Navy Yard ; two to enter- 
tainments in Westborough ; three to Worcester, one of which 
was a sleigh ride and another was to a foot-ball game, and 
still another to a picnic at Chauncy Lake. Six made visits 
home ; 8 elected 500 extra credits, instead of going home. The 
balance of the first grade either went out on probation imme- 
diately after gaining the prize, or forfeited it. On the whole, 
the effect of the class has been a wholesome one. 

It has been a pleasure to make this report, which I had 
earlier supposed would fall to the lot of my successor. The 
work which has been done I cheerfully turn over to his hands, 
hoping that he may make fewer mistakes and achieve far greater 
results than I have been able to bring to pass. 

Words wholly fail to express my appreciation of your confi- 
dence in me and your patience with my shortcomings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. F. CHAPIN, 

Superintendent. 



42 VISITATION EEPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 



EEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OP 
LYMAN SCHOOL PROBATIONERS. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

The eleventh annual report of the department of visitation 
of the Lyman School for Boys embraces a period of fourteen 
months, because of a change in the institution year, this year 
closing November 30, instead of September 30, as formerly; 
hence all the statistical tables, as far as they show records of 
work, have reference to this longer period. 

The total number of individuals on the visiting list for the year 
ending Nov. 30, 1906, was . . . 1,115 

Becoming of age during the year, 182 1 

Died, 1 

Discharged : — 

As an unfit subject, ......... 1 

For adoption, 1 

— 2 
Returned to the school and not relocated : — 

For serious fault, 29 

Not serious, 33 

— 62 

Total number passing out of our care during the year, . . . 247 

On the visiting list Dec. 1, 1906, 868 

Adding to the above number : — 

Transferred to the Massachusetts Reformatory : 2 — 

This year 12 

Previously, 28 

Runaways from the school : — 

Having been returned from probation, . . . .15 

Never having been on probation, 29 

— 84 

Total number under twenty-one outside the school, .... 952 

1 13 other boys came of age who had not been in the care of the visiting depart- 
ment within the year. 

2 The mittimus is sent to the reformatory with boys so transferred, and techni- 
cally they no longer belong to the Lyman School. They are now, however, upon 
release from the reformatory, retransferred to the custody of the Lyman School. 
All are included among the boys under twenty-one in the table on page 58. 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



43 



Classification of Visiting List. 
Of the 868 boys on the visiting list, 61 (not including those 
in the foreign service of the United States government) are 
classed as out of the State and employment unknown, and 56 
are on the unknown list. The occupations of the remaining 
751 boys, with the number engaged in each employment, are 
shown in the following' table : — 



Army, United States, 




8 


Lineman, 


Assisting parents, 


7 


Lithographer, . 


At board and attending school, 


55 


Lumber yard, . 


Attending school, 


20 


Machinist, 


Baker, 




5 


Mail carrier, . 


Barber, 






1 


Market 


Bell boy, . 






2 


Massachusetts Reformatory, 


Bicycle shop, 






3 


Meat packer, . 


Blacksmith, 






3 


Milk wagon, . 


Bleachery, . 






2 


Mill (textile), . 


Book binder, 






1 


Millwright, . 


Bottling works, 






1 


Navy, United States, . 


Box shop, . 






2 


Nurse, 


Button shop, 






1 


Occupation unknown, 


Candy factory, 






5 


Organ shop, . 


Carpenter, . 






8 


Other penal institutions, . 


Chauffeur, . 






3 


Painter, 


Clerk, 






24 


Paper mill, . 


Coachman, . 






1 


Pattern maker, . 


Comb factory, 






2 


Piano shop, . 


Cook, . 






2 


Plumber, 


Cutlery shop, 






1 


Porter, 


Electrical works 






10 


Printer, 


Elevator boy, 






5 


Quarry, 


Embalmer, 






I 


Railroad hand, . 


Errand boy, 






11 


Recently released, occupation 


Farmer, 






117 


unknown, . 


Fireman, . 






2 


Restaurant, . 


Fisherman, 






1 


Rope factory, . 


Foundry, 






12 


Rubber factory, . 


GlaSfl factory, 






1 


Saw mill, 


Hostler, 






10 


Shipper, 


[die, . 






14 


Shoe -hop, 


Invalid, 






2 


Soap factory, . 


Iron works, 






8 


Spile drivei-, . 


Laborer, 






16 


Steam titter 


Laundry, . 






4 


Tack factory, . 


Leather factory, 






6 


Tailor, 



44 VISITATION REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 



Tannery, . 
Tape factory, 
Teamster and driver, 
Telegraph operator, 
Tile factory, 



7 
2 

40 

1 
1 



Time keeper, 
Tin shop, . 
Toy shop, . 
Whip shop, 
Wire mill, . 



Reduced to approximate percentages, this table will show : — 

Per Cent. 
In United States army and navy, about .... 5 

At board, . .7 

Employed on farms, ........ 15 

In mills (textile), about 5 

Classed as laborers, 2 

Massachusetts Reformatory at Concord, .... 4 

In other penal institutions, 2 

In 76 different occupations, about 60 

The report cards of the above-mentioned 751 boys show that 
at the time of the last report 669, or 89 ] per cent., were doing- 
well; 32, or 4 per cent., doubtfully; and 50, or 7 per cent., 
badly. 

An analysis of the unknown list shows that 

25 disappeared this year. 
31 disappeared previously. 

And, again, that of this number 

28 left place with a farmer. 

13 left home or relatives. 

15 not located, family having moved. 



By arrangements with the Board of Prison Commissioners, 
boys who are transferred from the Lyman School to the Massa- 
chusetts Reformatory, and whose mittimi are accordingly sent 
with them, are now retransferred by the Prison Commissioners 
to the custody of your Board. When such a boy is ready to 
be released from the reformatory, our department is notified, 
and provision is made for his removal from the reformatory and 
for his subsequent care. Fourteen such boys have been so 

1 Boys transferred to the Massachusetts Reformatory and runaways from the 
school whose names are not upon the visiting list are not counted in this figure; 
but they are counted in the tables given on pages 58-60. 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



45 



transferred and provided for since February of this year, 7 
being placed out to work for wages and 7 returned to relatives. 
So far the results seem to be quite satisfactory. 

The following figures give the placings, returns, visits and 
collections of wages for the past fourteen months : — 



Placings. 
Number of boys placed in their homes when leaving the school, . 
Number of boys placed with others when leaving the school, 
Number of boys boarded out when leaving the school, 

Total number placed out within the year and becoming sub- 
jects of visitation, 

RETURNS. 

Number of boys within the year returned to the school : — 

For serious fault, ...,...., 
For relocation and other purposes, 

Total returned, 



149 

81 



312 



29 

110 

139 



Visits. 
Number of visits to probationers, .... 
Number of visits to boys over eighteen years of age, 
Number of boys over eighteen years of age visited, 
Average visits to boys over eighteen years of age, 
Number of visits to boys under eighteen years of age 
Number of boys under eighteen visited, 
Average visits to boys under eighteen years of age, 
Number of homes investigated and reported upon, in writing 
Number of new places investigated and reported upon, 



2,615 
912 
432 
2.1 

1,703 

511 

3.3 

336 

36 



Collections. 
Amount of money collected and paid over to the Lyman School as 

wages of boys, and placed in bank to their credit, . . .$1,557 08 
Number of boys in behalf of whom money was collected, . . 57 



Boys who are over eighteen usually make their own bargains 
and collect their own wages. 

One hundred and eighty-two boy r s whose names are upon the 
visiting list have become of age during the year. The fol- 
lowing table shows their occupation and standing : — 



46 VISITATION REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 



Army, 








8 


Market, 








5 


Box shop, . 








. 2 


Massachusetts Reformatory, 


4 


Brakeman, . 








2 


Mill (textile), . 


5 


Chauffeur, . 








. 1 


Navy, . 






15 


Clerk, 








. 5 


Occupation unknown 






4 


Comb shop, 








. 2 


Other institutions, 






10 


Conductor, . 








4 


Out of State, 






16 


Cook, . 








1 


Painter, 








2 


Drummer, . 








1 


Plasterer, . 








1 


Electrician, 








1 


Plumber, . 








1 


Expressman, 








2 


Porter, 








1 


Farmer, 








12 


Printer, 








5 


Fireman, . 








1 


Quarry, 








2 


Fish loft, . 








1 


Restaurant, 








2 


Foundry, . 








2 


Roofer, 








1 


Gate keeper, 








1 


Rubber factory, 








2 


Guide, 








1 


Sailor, 








2 


Insane asylum, 








1 


Ship yard, . 








1 


Invalid, 








2 


Shoe shop, . 








1 


Jewelry factory, 








2 


Tailor, 








1 


Jockey, 








2 


Tannery, . 








1 


Laborer, 








9 


Teamster, . 








9 


Longshoreman, 








1 


Unknown, . 








14 


Lumber camp, 








1 


Vegetable team, 








1 


Lumber yard, 








2 


Weigher, . 








1 


Machinist, . 








7 


Wire mill, . 








1 



The above table, expressed in percentages, shows : — 

Per Cent. 

United States army and navy, about . . . .12 

Employed on farms, about 7 

In other penal institutions (including the Massachusetts 
Reformatory), . . . . . . . . 8 

Employed in textile mills, 3 



The remaining 70 per cent, is divided among 43 different 
occupations. 

By our usual classification of boys in the visiting depart- 
ment becoming twenty-one years of age, 123, or 67 per cent., 
are doing well without question ; 14, or 7 per cent., not so 
well, but honestly self-supporting; 15, or 8 per cent., badly, 
14 of them in penal institutions; 14, or 7 per cent., where- 
abouts unknown; 16, or 11 per cent., out of the State. 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



47 



The following table 2 compares the conduct of boys coming 
of age within the year who have been placed out on farms with 
those who went back to their own people : — 





Standing. 




Of 78 Boys placed on 
Farms. 


Of 114 Boys released 

to their 
Parents or Relatives. 


Doing well without question, 


56, or 72 per cent. 


84, or 73 per cent. 


Not so well, but self-supporting, . 


6, or 8 " 


8, or 7 " 


Unknown, 


4, or 5 


10, or 9 " 


Badly, 


12, or 15 


12, or 11 " 



It may be of interest to note that, of the boys classed as 
unknown, 3 of the 4 placed on farms were doing excellently 
at the time of their disappearance, and 1 was doing badly ; 
and, of the 10 released to their parents, 5 were doing excel- 
lently at the time they were lost track of, and 5 were doing 
badly. 

Again, of the 78 boys who were sent to farms : — 

12 are now doing well on farms, earning good wages. 
32 are now doing well in their city homes. 
12 are in the army and navy. 

5 were returned to the school and transferred to the Massachusetts 

Reformatory. 
11 are either unknown or are doing badly. 

6 are out of the State. 

One hundred and lifty-two of the 182 boys on the visiting 
list becoming twenty-one years of age were never returned to 
the school for a second term. 

Following are histories of two of the boys becoming of age 
during the year, one of whom was allowed to go to his home, 
and the other, having no suitable home, was placed with a 
fanner. 



1 The table includes all who have ever been on probation, thus counting in with 
the 182 in the c;ire of the visiting department within the year 9 others, in former 
years dropped from this list, all of them having been transferred to the Massachu- 
setts Reformatory. 



48 VISITATION EEPOET LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

John came to the school at the age of fourteen on a charge 
of larceny, and had twice before been in court for malicious 
mischief. He was in the school eighteen months, and then was 
allowed to return to his home in the city. Here he secured 
work in a leather factory, and has remained with the same firm, 
being steadily advanced until he was last year earning $11 per 
week. The visitor reported as follows : "I saw John at home 
in the evening. He appears well, and is a fine example of 
what the Lyman School can do for a boy. He himself says 
that the school started him out new and gave him ambition. 
He is still with the leather company." He has become of age 
within the past month, and is still doing well. He has set 
himself up in business, and is making good money. He ap- 
pears well and speaks well of the school. 

Another boy who has recently become of age was sent to the 
school by the State Board on a charge of larceny, having been 
in their charge since his father died when he was a small boy 
of five. He was at the school nineteen months, and was then 
placed with a farmer. He has been at this same place for over 
six years, and is thoroughly identified with the family, as he 
still makes it his home there and works out. The visitor's re- 
port five years ago was: "C is doing first rate. It is 

seldom that I hear a boy so well spoken of by his employer ; " 

and three years later : " C is still doing first rate. He is 

thoroughly identified with the S family, and will not leave, 

even though offered larger wages." 

As one illustration of the success of a little boy from the 
Berlin branch, I introduce the case of D . He was com- 
mitted to the school at the age of twelve years and nine months, 
and was immediately sent to the Berlin branch. His offence 
was larceny. His good behavior here made it possible to find 
a home for him after having been two months in the school. 
He was practically thirteen years of age when placed out, and 
stayed in the same place until he was eighteen , attending school 
during the school age and later working on the farm. His de- 
portment has always been excellent, and on the occasion of his 

eighteenth birthday the visitor reports that D has a bank 

book of $130, and $50 in cash. He is making his home with 
the farmer with whom he has been for the past five years while 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 49 

studying telegraphy at a near-by railroad station, and will soon 
be able to take a station himself. He is a fine young man, re- 
spected by the community. 

No part of our work has been more cheering than our ex- 
tended correspondence with the boys. As formerly, letters 
have been written to groups of boys, but more generally than 
ever before we have kept in touch with individuals by per- 
sonal letters. The following letters are from boys of different 
ages, and indicate their real status better than any affirmations 
of the visitor could do. 

The boy who wrote the following letter was twelve years of 
age when committed to the Lyman School. His offence was 
breaking, entering and larceny, and he had been once before 
arrested for the same offence. After a stay of seventeen 
months in the school he was placed in a country home, from 
which he writes : — 

Dear Mr. Wheeler : — I received the letter that you wrote me 
ami was glad to hear from you. I have got a good home down here 
where I am and I like it very much. I like the people that I am with 
and they like me too. 

I am a good boy and am getting along good. I help in the haying 
and have done some garden work. We have got a good lot of hens 

and chickens and I have few of my own that Mr. M. gave me. 

I have got a patch of potatoes and a dozen tomato plants which I 
will he able to sell myself. We have got one cow and one horse and 
I like them too. I am doing my best to keep out of all kinds of 
trouble. I will now close my letter by sending goodby to you all. 
Yours truly, . 

Enclosed with this letter was a note from the lady with 
\\ bom he lives. She says : — 

I want to say a few words as regards A . 



We find him a darling boy, and think the world of him. He has 
been good in every way siner he came here, and has never said a 
saucy, cmss, profane or vulgar word. He is a good boy to mind, 
and you could not have sent US :i better one. He has a good, clean, 

healthy home and good Influences. We encourage him by paying 

him for doing little things and he saves his money. . . . Don't 
worry about him, for we shall use him as we would our own. 



50 VISITATION KEPOET LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 
An ambitious lad of seventeen years writes me as follows : — 

Dear Mr. Wheeler : — I received your welcome letter some time 
ago and was much pleased to hear from you. In your letter you ask 
how I am getting along. Last March I received my diploma of 

graduation from the Evening High School where I have been 

going for 3 years. I am going again this year to take a preparatory 

course as I am going to enter the Law School next year and I 

hope to pass the bar examinations. I have been learning my trade 
(printing compositor) that I first started at the school. I have served 
4 years altogether and have been admitted as a 2-3 compositor in the 
Typographical Union. 

I will receive a journeyman's card in 3 months time. I am trying 
to get into one of the newspaper offices and thanks to the ready help 
of some of my friends, I hope to get on one sometime. I have been 
studying shorthand and typewriting as I hope to make use of them at 
the Law School in copying and taking notes on the lectures. My 
mother and myself are well and hope you and your folks are too. 
Hoping you will forgive me for not writing sooner, I remain, 

Your young friend, . 

The above-mentioned boy was committed to the school at the 
age of thirteen for breaking, entering and larceny, and was 
released after a short stay of fifteen months. 

One little boy of eleven years was sent to the school for 
malicious injury to property. He was sent to our Berlin branch, 
and remained there only about four months, when he was placed 
out at board in a good family, and remained there for three 
years, when his people petitioned for his release to them, and 
he was allowed to return to his own people. Last March the 
visitor reports : — 

William closes to-day a most excellent record with Mr. W . 

His record has been so nearly perfect in every place, at school, at 
home and in the neighborhood, that all regret his going away. He 
is a delightful boy, bright, alert, well-disposed and pretty. 

In August the boy writes as follows : — 

Dear Mr. Wheeler : — I was pleased to find a letter in the post 
office. I am getting along all right and my family and hope you are 
the same. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 51 

I am working in the mill and I have got a good job. I am trying 
to be a good boy. I would like to go to school. My writing looks 
so I ought to go but we need the money. I would like to live with 

Mr. W again. He was very good to me. I would like to hear 

from you again. 

From your friend, William . 

George was committed as a stubborn child when thirteen 
years of age. He was a colored lad, and did well in the school. 
After a stay of fifteen months he returned to his city home. 
Now, in his eighteenth year, he writes as follows : — 

Dear Friend : — I now take great pleasure in answering your 
letter which I received yesterday. I am at present at the seaside, 
having had an opportunity to go to the beach for the season, and I 
have been here since June 15. I intended to attend the Y. M. C. A. 
and take a course in automobiling in the repair shop so that I could 
secure a position as a chauffeur. How are the boys in the school? I 
trust it will not be long before I will be able to visit the institution 
once more. 

I haven't seen the visiting officers for quite a while because of my 
untimuble hours, which, according to the work I am doing, compell 
me not to take any special time for being away from duty. Mr. 
W heeler I wish to be remembered to the inmates of the school as one 
who perhaps does not know them personally but as one who has been 
in the school and now is not sorry that he was sent there. 

Yours sincerely, George . 

Fred has had a particularly interesting career. He was sent 
to the school at the age of fourteen and one-half for breaking 
and entering. He had been arrested once before for truancy, 
and had served one year in the Parental School. His home 
was a very poor one, and his parents given to drink. He was 
a very good boy at the school, and after a stay of twenty 
months was placed out with a farmer. Here be found plenty 
of hard work, but also good friends, who helped him with his 
Lessons, a- be was ambitious to obtain an education. He gave 
good satisfaction to his employer, and stayed with him for two 
years. With extra money he had earned by hunting and with 
the help of a friend who became acquainted with his good qual- 
ities while at his place he then went to a school where he 



52 VISITATION REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

could partly pay his way by working. Here he was very 
happy, and his teachers spoke in the highest terms of his char- 
acter and deportment. He maintained himself here for a year, 
and has now gone to California, his fare being paid by the 
friend who became so interested in his welfare. He writes us 
from there as follows : — 

Dear Mr. Wheeler : — I arrived here last night and find that the 
mining country is quite different from New England. I was just nine 
days coming, having stopped off one day at Cleveland and at Chicago. 

I have seen quite a little of the West now. Denver, Col. is not as 
I expected to find it. I have not seen any place that I like as well 
as the Connecticut valley for a farming country, that is, I like the 
mixed farming the best and stock raising and the green fields and 
trees. I am going to work here in the mine and my board I will 
work out at the hotel so that I shall make about $75 a month. I 
shall try to do my best here. 

Yours truly, Fred . 

Another boy, fourteen years of age, was committed for 
being a stubborn child, and had once been before the court 
for fighting. He was a pretty good boy while at the school, 
and was considered quite capable. After a stay of seventeen 
months he was allowed to return to his home. Now, in his 
twentieth year, he writes : — 

Dear Sir: — I was very pleased to hear from you today as it has 
been quite a while since I received a letter from you. I have not 
had much time to write as I go to work at 3.30 in the morning and 
do not get through until 7 at night and then I am so tired that I go 
to bed. I am working in the meat and provision business and like 
it very well, although I have long hours. My boss is very good to 
me and helps me along as much as he can. At this writing he is 
going on his vacation and he has let me do the buying for his two 
stores. 

The farmers get in very early and it is hustle all the time to get 
your goods in time to sell. It will not be very long before I shall be 
foreman of one of the stores he owns as he has taken a great liking 
to me and wants me to get ahead. All the boys around here laugh 
at me for working such long hours but I don't mind as I get more 
pleasure than they think. I am earning $12 a week now. I put part 
of it in the bank and the rest of it goes home. At first it was hard 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 53 

to save any but after I got a few dollars in it went along easily. If 
everything goes along well with me I intend to have a store of my 
own in a few years. I began at the very bottom of the business 
and have worked up and that is what makes me able to run a store 
although I am only a boy yet. I do not wish to praise myself but I 
want you to know what a lot of good Lyman School did for me. 
Hoping to hear from you soon again, I remain, 

Your friend, . 

The following history is interesting, not only because of the 
subject matter, but because the boys mentioned are brothers, 
and all committed on the same day to the Lyman School. 
This report is given by A. Frederick Howe, visitor, in whose 
district the boys lived. 

A, B and C, three brothers, aged fourteen, twelve and 
eleven, were committed to the Lyman School at the same time. 
A was kept at the main school in Westborough, while B and 
C were placed in the annex at Berlin. They were not what 
are considered bad boys, but they came from a congested sec- 
tion of a manufacturing city, Avhere their only playgrounds 
were the streets, swarming with children. When received, A 
appeared to be the most promising. When he had made up his 
cicd its, after a stay of twenty-two months in the main school, 
he returned to his home. He soon renewed his acquaintance 
with his old companions, and in a short time committed an 
offence for which he was sentenced to another institution. 
Since his second release he has done fairly well, especially 
when his environments are taken into consideration. 

B and C were placed in Berlin. After three months there 
they were placed in a family in the country, where they at- 
tended school and did light chores. At first it required con- 
siderable tact and patience on the pari of the people with whom 

they lived, and attention from the visitor, to settle them down. 

However, they soon became attached to their new friend- 
in the home, their neighbors, schoolmates and the teacher. 
B ah- a great manual worker, and cared but little for bis 
books, c Loved hi- books, but was willing to have some one 
else do the manual work for him. The\ remained together in 
tin- family until B was fourteen years of age, and then, with- 
out difficulty (because of their good reputation), other places 



54 VISITATION REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

were found where they could attend school and also earn 
wages. Both have succeeded admirably. B is now nineteen 
years of age, and is well known for his sobriety, honesty and 
capabilities as a faithful worker. C, who is now eighteen years 
of age, has well improved his opportunities of attending school, 
and is known as a good scholar, an upright young man, and 
has also developed into a very fair worker. Both are to-day 
great, strapping, healthy fellows, in places of their own choos- 
ing, and are highly respected by citizens. Each has laid up 
quite a sum of money. 

What may be termed the routine of our work has been of 
much the same character as formerly." Our weekly confer- 
ences and various meetings with the committee of your Board 
at the school have been held as usual ; but from its very nature 
there can be no routine in all the real work of a department 
like this. Each day, nay, each hour, presents some new prob- 
lem, either of the boy, his employer or employment, or his 
home and surroundings. The visitor finds that this boy needs 
encouragement, and a warm and friendly hand-grasp to steady 
him in a crisis ; that one, an earnest talk and advice ; another 
needs the compelling force of authority laid upon him to tide 
over what would otherwise be a lapse of conduct. Differing 
temperaments, varying conditions and unlike surroundings, 
not alone in the boys, but in their parents, employers or in 
the families with whom the boys are temporarily placed, com- 
bine to make the work of a visitor not only exceedingly in- 
teresting, but worthy of the best thought and study that can 
be applied to it. No visitor can be called successful who does 
not possess a key to the hearts of his wards, and who is not 
met by both boy and his parents with a warm welcome. No 
one can prescribe the exact duties of a visitor, — his best and 
most efficient work is never done by rule. 

The department of visitation desires to express in this pub- 
lic manner its grateful acknowledgments to the retiring super- 
intendent of the Lyman School, Mr. Theodore F. Chapin, for 
his constant support and valuable counsel through the eleven 
years of its existence. He has lightened all our problems and 
augmented all our successes. Though technically separate, 
the work has been in reality one. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 55 



Financial Statement, 1906. 
Expended for : — 

Salaries of visitors, $5,726 68 

Office furniture, 29 31 

Office assistance, 334 83 

Telephone service, . . 91 58 

Travelling expenses, 4,236 26 

Stationery and postage, 86 56 



$10,505 22 
Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER A. WHEELER, 

Superintendent of Lyman School Probationers. 







7 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



57 



STATISTICS COlS T CERNriXG BOYS. 



Table No. 1. 

Number received and leaving the School for Fourteen Months, ending 

Nov. 30, 1906. 

Boys in the school Sept. 30, 1905, 330 

Received: — Committed, ......... 226 

Returned from place, 81 

Returned " boarded-out " boys, . . . .51 
Returned Berlin boys, not boarded out, ... 4 

Recommitted, 3 

Runaways recaptured, 32 

Returned from Massachusetts General Hospital, . 5 
Returned from Eye and Ear Infirmary, ... 2 

404 



AVhole number in school during the fourteen months, . 

Released : — On probation to parents, .... 

On probation to others, .... 

Boarded out, ...... 

Transferred to Massachusetts Reformatory, 

Runaways, 

Transferred to State Almshouse, 

For self, 

Died, 

Massachusetts General Hospital, 
Massachusetts School for Feeble-minded, 
Turned over to grand jury, 
Eye and Ear Infirmary, .... 
Returned to court, 



734 1 



149 
79 
82 
13 
48 2 

1 

2 

1 

3 

6 

1 

2 

o 



389 



Remaining in the school Nov. 80, 19<>6 345 



1 This represents 631 individuals. 

- There were 88 other runaways who were brought hack so promptly that they 
were not recorded as absent from the institution. These hgures count as separate 
runaways the repeated escapes of the same hoy. Dealing with individual hoj-s. 
there were :>9 who absconded, and 51 others who got off the grounds, hut were re- 
turned too promptly to he counted as getting away. 



dS 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Dec, 



Table No. 2. 

Monthly Admissions, Releases and Average Number of Inmates. 



MONTHS. 


Admitted. 


Released. 


Average No. 


October, 


43 


25 


336.74 


November, 












34 


28 


351.07 


December, 












27 


30 


347.06 


January, . 












24 


29 


345.00 


February, 












16 


18 


345.61 


March, 












22 


31 


340.70 


April, 












22 


27 


336.37 


May, 












27 


29 


328.77 


June, 












25 


31 


321.70 


July, 












43 


35 


324.19 


August, . 












40 


28 


332.39 


September, 












29 


28 


337.80 


October, . 












27 


24 


343.25 


November, 












25 


26 


343.76 


Totals, 












404 


389 


338.13 



Table No. 3. 

A. Showing the Status of All Boys under Tiventy-one whose Names were 
on the Books of the Lyman School Nov. 30, 1906. 

In the school, 345 

Released from the school : — 

With parents, . 440 

With others, 79 

For themselves, 86 

At board, 55 

Sentenced to Massachusetts Reformatory : — 

This year, 22 

Former years, 10 

o2 

Transferred to Massachusetts Reformatory, . . . .40 

Sentenced to penal institutions other than Massachusetts 

Reformatory, . . 13 

Left the State 61 

In the United States Army, 8 

In the United States Navy, . 38 

Lost sight of : — 

This year, 30 

Previously, 26 

Runaways from the school, whereabouts unknown, . 36 
Runaways known to be in other institutions or navy, 8 

952 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



59 



Table No. 3 — Continued. 
Discharged from the care of the school : — 
Returned to court as over age limit, 
Returned to court, revision of sentence, . 

George Junior Republic, 

Discharged as unfit subject, to parents, 

Discharged as unfit subject, to State Board of Charity, 

Discharged as unfit subject, to Overseers of the Poor, 

Discharged to parents, to go out of State, 

Discharged by order of supreme court, 

Committed to the school for feeble-minded, 

Committed to almshouses and hospitals, 

Discharged for adoption, 

Dead, 



3 

1 
2 
8 
1 
1 
8 
1 

21 
4 
1 

18 



69 



1,366 



B. Showing Condition by Ages of All Boys outside the School, subject to its 
Custody, also including Runaways from the School and those trans- 
f erred to the Massachusetts Reformatory. 
Condition of all boys under twenty-one on probation up to Dec. 1, 1906 : — 

Doing well, 635 or 66 per cent. 

82 or 9 per cent. 

71 or 7 per cent. 

61 or 7 per cent. 

103 or 11 per cent. 



Not doing well, .... 
In some penal institution, 
Out of the State, .... 
Whereabouts and condition unknown, 



952 



Condition of boys under twenty-one on probation one year or more : — 



Doing well, 

X<»t doing well, .... 
In -Mine penal institution, 

«>ut of the State 

Whereabontfl ami condition unknown, 



428 or (il per cent. 
68 or 10 per cent. 
\'> or 6 per cent. 
60 or 9 per cent. 
63 or 1 1 per cent. 



664 



Condition of boys under twenty-one on prob 

Doing well, ..... 

Not doing well 

In some penal institution, 

Out of the State 

Whereabouts and condition unknown, 



ition two years or more : — 

308 or 62 per cent 

62 or 12 per cent 
31 or 6 per cent. 

49 or 10 per cent. 
49 or 10 per cent. 



499 



60 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Dec, 



Table No. 3 — Concluded. 
Condition of all boys under twenty-one on probation who complete their 
nineteenth year before Dec. 1, 1906 : — 
Doing well, ..... 
Not doing well, .... 
In some penal institution, 
Out of the State, .... 
Whereabouts and condition unknown, 



215 or 65 per cent. 
17 or 5 per cent. 
29 or 9 per cent. 
28 or 9 per cent. 
40 or 12 per cent. 



329 

Condition of all boys under twenty-one on probation who complete their 
twentieth year before Dec. 1, 1906 : — 

Doing well, 109 or 66 per cent. 

Not doing well, 8 or 5 per cent. 

In some penal institution, 14 or 9 per cent. 

Out of the State, 13 or 8 per cent. 

Whereabouts and condition unknown, . . 21 or 12 per cent. 

165 
Condition of all boys who complete their twenty-first year before Dec. 1, 



1906: — 

Doing well, .... 

Not doing well, 

In some penal institution, 

Out of the State, 

Lost track of : — 

Doing well at last accounts, 
Not doing well at last accounts, 



123 or 63 per cent. 
14 or 7 per cent. 
21 or 11 per cent. 
16 or 8 per cent. 



. 10 
. 11 
— 21 or 11 per cent. 

195 
Table No. 4. 

Commitments from the Several Counties, Past Fourteen Months and pre- 
viously. 



COUNTIES. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Totals. 


Barnstable, 


3 


70 


73 


Berkshire, 














5 


294 


299 


Bristol, . 














24 


832 


856 


Dukes, 














_ 


18 


18 


Essex, 














24 


1,314 


1,338 


Franklin,. 














1 


70 


71 


Hampden, 














20 


549 


569 


Hampshire, 














1 


108 


109 


Middlesex, 














71 


1,661 


1,732 


Nantucket, 














- 


18 


18 


Norfolk, . 














5 


529 


534 


Plymouth, 














4 


177 


181 


Suffolk, . 














40 


1,830 


1,870 


Worcester, 














28 


986 


1,014 


Totals, 














226 


8,456 


8,682 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



(>1 



Table No. 5. 
Nativity of Parents of Boys committed during the Past Ten Years. 





9 

*> 


/. 

9 

r. 


9 

9 

30 


9 
O 

9 


H 
O 
9 


© 
9 


M 

e 
9 


o 

S3 


9 

9 


a 


Fathers born in the United States, 


16 


8 


8 


16 


18 


20 


23 


21 


14 


26 


Mothers born in the United States, 


15 


28 


21 


15 


19 


19 


8 


22 


20 


12 


Fathers foreign born, 


12 


25 


18 


12 


17 


17 


8 


19 


16 


14 


Mothers foreign born, 


11 


10 


17 


16 


15 


14 


24 


19 


12 


27 


Both parents born in United States, 


23 


31 


27 


36 


47 


52 


48 


32 


46 


53 


Both parents foreign born, 


34 


56 


47 


90 


83 


80 


71 


74 


89 


95 


Unknown, 


34 


45 


44 


11 


14 


17 


17 


18 


23 


31 


One parent unknown, 


32 


33 


36 


13 


1 


22 


13 


29 


12 




Per cent, of American parentage, . 


31 


27 


25 


30 


35 


37 


36 


30 


32 


32 


Per cent, of foreign parentage, 


37 


40 


39 


60 


54 


40 


50 


52 


53 


51 


Per cent, unknown, 


32 


33 


36 


10 


11 


14 


14 


18 


15 


17 



Nativity of Boys committed during the Past Ten Years. 



Born in United States, . 


103 


146 


130 


142 


158 


167 


153 


155 


171 


200 


Foreign born, ..... 


20 


33 


37 


30 


24 


26 


18 


23 


18 


25 


Unknown, ..... 


1 


5 


1 


1 


■'■ 


2 


3 


1 


o 


1 



Table No. 6. 

Authority for Commitments during the Past Fourteen Months. 



COMMITMENTS. 


Past 14 Months. 


By district court, 

municipal court, 

police court, 

Buperior court, 

trial justices, 

State Board of Charity, 

juvenile court, 


123 
25 
61 
4 
5 
7 
1 


Total 


226 



62 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Dec, 



Table No. 7. 
Age of Boys when committed, Past Fourteen Months and previously, 





Committed 


Committed 


Committed 




AGE. 


during 


from 


previous to 


Totals. 




Past Year. 


1885-1905. 


1885. 




Six 






5 


5 


Seven, . 




- 


1 


25 


26 


Eight, . 




1 


9 


115 


125 


Nine, 




5 


21 


231 


257 


Ten, 




13 


79 


440 


532 


Eleven, . 




24 


177 


615 


816 


Twelve, 




37 


444 


748 


1,229 


Thirteen, 




60 


805 


897 


1,762 


Fourteen, 




79 


1,294 


778 


2,151 


Fifteen, . 




7 


80 


913 


1,000 


Sixteen, 




- 


13 


523 


536 


Seventeen, 




- 


3 


179 


182 


Eighteen and over, 
Unknown, 




_ 


_ 


17 


17 




- 


12 


32 


44 


Totals, . 




226 


2,938 


5,518 


8,682 



Table No. 8. 
Domestic Condition of Boys committed to the School during the Year. 

Had parents, 142 

no parents, 16 

father 23 

mother, 45 

step-father, . . 10 

step-mother, 7 

intemperate father, . . . . .73 

intemperate mother, 7 

both parents intemperate, . 14 

both parents separated, 16 

attended church, 226 

never attended church, 

not attended school within one year, 19 

not attended school within two years, 5 

not attended school within three years, 2 

been arrested before, . 126 

been inmates of other institutions, 62 

used intoxicating liquor, 13 

used tobacco, 132 

Were employed in the mill or otherwise when arrested, ... 43 

Were attending school, 86 

Were idle, • 97 

Parents owning residence, 28 

Members of the family had been arrested, 57 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



63 



Table No. 9. 

Length of Detention of 341 Boys who have left during the Fourteen Months 
ending Nov. 30, 1906. 



3 months or less, . . .53 


2 years 


3 months, ... 6 


4 months, . 






8 


2 years 


4 months, 






9 


5 months, . 






6 


2 years 


5 months, 






6 


6 months, . 






5 


2 years 


6 months, 






3 


7 months, . 






9 


2 years 


7 months, 






5 


8 months, . 






8 


2 years 


8 months, 






7 


9 months, . 






8 


2 years 


9 months, 






5 


10 months, . 






4 


2 years 


10 months, 






1 


11 months, . 






5 


2 years 


11 months, 






3 


1 year, . 






1 


3 years, 


• 






2 


1 year 1 month, 






6 


3 years 


1 month, 






. 1 


1 year 2 months, 






17 


3 years 


2 months, 






1 


1 year 3 months, 






16 


3 years 


3 months, 






3 


1 year 4 months, 






12 


3 years 


4 months, 






1 


1 year 5 months 






19 


3 years 


5 months, 






3 


1 year 6 months, 






14 


3 years 


6 months, 






1 


1 year 7 months, 






13 


3 years 


8 months, 






4 


1 year 8 months, 






9 


3 years 


9 months, 






2 


1 year 9 months, 






18 


8 years 


10 months, 






1 


1 year 10 months, 






8 


3 years 


11 months, 






1 


1 year 1 1 months, 






15 


4 years, 








3 


2 years, . 






!) 







2 years l month, 






4 


Total, . . . ,341 


ira 2 month-. 






G 













Months. 

Average time spent in the institution, 17.05 

Average time spent in the institution of boarded boys, . . . L70 
Average time spent in the institution of probationers not boarded, 

released for the first time 19.70 



64 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



Table No. 10. 

Comparative Table, showing Average Numbers of Inmates, New Commit- 
ments, Returns by Probation or Otherwise for Ten Years. 





Average 
Number. 


New Com- 
mitments. 


Returned 

for 
Any Cause. 


Placed on 
Probation. 


Discharged 
Otherwise. 


1896-97, . 


261.87 


124 


73 


170 


38 


1897-98, 








279.42 


184 


102 


201 


46 


1898-99, 








295.52 


168 


197 


227 


55 


1899-1900, 








299.65 


173 


115 


242 


36 


1900-01, 








303.89 


185 


107 


208 


56 


1901-02, 








310.19 


195 


104 


264 


45 


1902-03, 








323.37 


174 


132 


208 


95 


1903-04, 








319.72 


179 


117 


231 


42 


1904-05, 








336,21 


191 


142 


282 


64 


Dec. 1, 1905, to Nov. 30, 1906, 


338.13 


226 


178 


311 


78 


Average 


for t< 


?nye 


ars, . 


306.79 


179.9 


126.7 


234.4 


55.5 



Table No. 11. 

Commitments by Months for Ten Years. 





05 


00 
© 
00 


OS 

© 


© 


© 

© 


© 
© 


M 

© 
© 


© 
© 


M5 

© 
© 


©-*5 


October, . 

November, 

December, 

January, . 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, . 

September, 

October, . 

November, 


10 

10 

9 

8 

9 

11 

11 

7 

6 

9 

13 
21 

124 


18 
12 
10 
11 
12 
12 
15 
21 
13 
22 
17 
21 


21 
15 

9 
13 

8 

12 
14 
14 
10 
22 
15 
15 


15 
18 
14 
8 
12 
19 
14 
12 
20 
13 
14 
14 


31 
12 

7 
15 

8 
17 
11 
11 
11 
15 
29 
18 


13 

13 

9 

10 
21 
16 
21 
21 
19 
20 
13 
19 


23 

14 

11 

4 

3 

15 
22 
15 
17 
15 
18 
17 


8 

16 

10 

8 

9 

12 
16 
20 
20 
17 
23 
20 


16 
10 
16 
10 
6 

17 
25 
18 
14 
20 
17 
22 

191 


25 
25 
17 
13 
8 

12 
12 
15 
14 
23 
21 
15 
16 
10 


Totals, 


184 


168 


173 


185 


195 


174 


179 


226 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



65 



Table No. 12. 

Offences for which Boys were committed during Fourteen Months. 



Assault, 


5 


Vagrancy, 


7 


Attempted arson, 


1 


Unlawful appropriation, . 


2 


Breaking and entering, 


48 


Ringing false fire-alarm, . 


1 


Burning building, 


2 


Violating rules of truant school 


2 


Habitual absentee and school 




Idle and disorderly, . 


1 


offender, 


4 


Malicious mischief, . 


1 


Larceny, 


81 


Delinquent child, 


. 9 


Molesting the mechanism of a 




Breaking glass, . 


. 1 


railroad train, 


2 




— 


Stubbornness, .... 


55 


Total, .... 


. 226 


Taking team, .... 


4 







Table No. 13. — Some Comparative Statistics. 

A Showing the Average Age oj Boys released on Probation for the Past 

Ten Years. 





Years. 






Years. 


1897, . 


. 15.15 


1902,. 


. 


. 14.42 


1898, . 


. 15.60 


1903, 


. 


. 14.50 


1899, . 


. 15.17 


1904, 


. 


. 15.30 


1900, . 


. 15.31 


1905, 


. 


. 15.41 


1901, . 


. 15.50 


1906 (14 months), 


. 14.83 



B. Showing the Average Time spent in the Institution for the I 'as/ T< n 

Years. 





Months. 








Months. 


1897, . 


. 21.00 


1902, 


• 


• 


. 19.53 


1898, . 


. 19.90 


1903, 






. 19.03 


1899, . 


. 20.40 


1904, 


. 




. 20.36 


1900, . 


. 19.27 


1905, 


. 




. 20.39 


1901, . 


. 20.25 


1906 


(14 


months), 


. 17.05 



M 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



Table No. 13. — Some Comparative Statistics — Concluded. 
C. Showing the Average Age of Commitments for the Past Ten Years. 





Years. 




Years. 


1897, . 


. 13.31 


1902, .... 


. 13.38 


1898, . 


. 13.17 


1903, .... 


. 13.51 


1899, . 


. 13.48 


1904 


. 13.47 


1900, . 


. 13.08 


1905, 


. 13.51 


1901, . 


. 13.70 


1906 (14 months), 


. 13.23 



D. Showing the Number of Boys returned to the School for Any Cause 

for Ten Tears. 



1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 



73 

102 
107 
115 
107 



1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906 (14 months), 



104 
132 
117 
142 

178 



E. Showing Weekly Per Capita Cost of the Institution for Ten Years. 





Gross. 


Net. 




Gross. 


Net. 


1897, . 


$4 72 


$4 66 


1902, . 


. 


$4 54 


|4 47 


1898, . 


4 52 


4 49 


1903, . 


• 


4 74 


4 72 


1899, . 


4 39 


4 36 


1904, . 


• 


4 90 


4 87 


1900, . 


4 73 


4 70 


1905, . 


• 


4 63 


4 61 


1901, . 


4 47 


4 45 


1906 (14 


months), 


4 90 


4 84 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



67 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Current Expenses of the Institution for Fourteen Months end- 
ing Nov. 30, 1906. 

1905. — October, . 

November, 
December, 

1906. — January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, . 

November, 

1100,968 66 
Expenditures. 

Bills paid as per Vouchers at the State Treasury {Acts of 1905, Chapter 

82) for Conduit. 
1905. — December, $629 58 



$7,263 24 


5,326 48 


7,470 07 


11,251 90 


6,555 84 


8,152 28 


5,773 62 


9,376 04 


5,521 53 


6,528 08 


7,022 50 


6,176 35 


6,595 25 


7,955 48 



Deficiency Appropriation (Acts of 1906) for Conduit. 



1906, 



$570 74 



Special Appropriation (Acts of 1905, Chapter 118) for Boarding. 
1905, $1,329 67 

Special Appropriation (Acts of 1900, Chapter 89) for Boarding. 

1906. — March, f 1,306 20 

June, 1,228 07 

August, 886 64 

November, 1,330 55 



$4,700 46 



$8 FINANCIAL STATEMENT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 



Special Appropriation (Acts of 1906, Chapter 86) for Bath-room at 

Berlin Farmhouse. 

1906. — August, $359 04 

October, 40 72 

|499 76 

Special Appropriation {Acts of 1906, Chapter 86) for New Cottage. 

1906. — August, 8581 60 

October, 2,211 73 

November, 3,400 00 

$6,193 33 

Special Appropriation (Acts of 1906, Chapter 86) for Subway Extension. 

1906. — August, $259 37 

November, 240 46 

$499 83 

Special Appropriation (Acts of 1906, Chapter 86) for Changes in Heating 

System. 

1906. — August, $1,739 20 

September, . . . 688 11 

November, . 904 36 

$3,331 67 

Cash Receipts paid into the State Treasury during the Four- 
teen Months ending Nov. 30, 1906. 

Farm produce sales, $869 15 

Miscellaneous sales, . . 200 15 

Labor of boys, 67 56 

$1,136 86 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 18, 



69 






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70 FINANCIAL STATEMENT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec, 



Average Cost per Boy per Bay {in Cents and Mills) 





Salable s, Wages and 
Labor. 


o 
o 


J3 
Mm 

•o-r 

- M 

o.2 
5 


aa 

60 

a 

s 

'3 

3 


a 

d 
Ml 

W 


a 

a a 

es at 

a 

02 CI 

rt O 
C5 


73 

a 

es 

_o 

5 * 

ce a 

s 

ES 

- 


to 

s 
o 

C9 

a 

o 

m 

i 




FOR THE 

TEAR 
ENDING/ — 


a 
o 

*.• 

Bo 

a « 


1 
•a 
o 
a 
an 
H 


a 
.2 

! 

D 


"3 
o 


m 

"3 
o 
H 


Sept. 30, 1899, . 
Sept. 30, 1900, . 
Sept. 30, 1901, . 
Sept. 30, 1902, . 
Sept. 30, 1903, . 
Sept. 30, 1904, . 
Sept. 30, 1905, . 
Nov. 30, 1906, . 


.095 
.102 
.087 
.081 
.075 
.090 
.083 
.080 


.072 
.072 
.063 
.077 
.073 
.083 
.081 
.083 


.083 

.086 
.099 
.090 
.100 
.097 
.096 
.104 


.252 
.260 
.249 
.248 
.248 
.270 
.260 
.267 


.100 
.102 
.102 
.112 
.099 
.107 
.116 
.092 


.051 
.065 
.047 
.057 
.042 
.049 
.051 
.064 


.018 
.021 
.022 

.019 
.022 
.020 
.021 
.029 


.077 
.075 
.062 
.074 
.085 
.086 
.054 
.066 


.038 
.057 
.062 

.046 
.040 
.049 
.038 
.053 


.051 
.049 
.060 
.048 
.064 
.054 
.063 
.060 


.039 
.050 
.034 
.055 
.077 
.065 
.058 
.069 


.628 
.675 
.638 
.649 
.677 
.700 
.661 
.700 






1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



71 



SUMMARY OF FARM ACCOUNT 

For Fourteen Months ending Nov. 30, 1906. 



Dr. 
Live stock, agricultural implements and farm 

produce on hand, as appraised Sept 30, 1905, $ 16,495 93 

Board 520 00 

Farm tools and repairs, 1,150 10 

Fertilizer, 472 72 

Grain and meal for stock, 3,979 39 

Horseshoeing, 132 61 

Labor of boys, 910 00 

Live stock 1,103 80 

Odd repairs, 32 50 

Seeds and plants, 429 18 

Veterinary, 29 50 

Wages, 1,662 52 

Rent, 547 50 

$27,465 75 

Net gain, 1,997 45 

$29,463 20 
Cr. 

Produce sold, $869 05 

Produce consumed, 11,684 70 

Produce on hand, 7,782 04 

Live stock, 6,154 10 

Agricultural implements, 2,973 31 

$29,463 20 

Poultry Account. 
Dk. 
To fowl, feed, incubators, etc., on hand Sept. 30, 

1905, $478 70 

To feed and supplies, 444 77 

To net gain, 309 64 

$1,233 11 

Cr. 
By eggs and poultry used and sold, . . . $752 61 
By fowl, feed and incubators on hand, as ap- 
praised Nov. 30, 1906, 480 50 

$1,233 11 



SUMMAEY LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



SUMMAEY OF THE FBOPERTY" OF THE 
LYMAN SCHOOL. 







Real Estate. 






138f acres tillage land, $22,419 00 




15 acres pasture land, 450 00 




6 acres wood land, ..... 300 00 




100 acres Berlin farm, 1,100 00 








824,269 0O- 




Buildings. 




Administration building, f 11,100 00 




Lyman Hall, 










38,000 00 




Maple Cottage, . 












3,700 00 




Willow Park Cottage, 












5,000 00 




"Wayside Cottage, 












5,900 00 




Hillside Cottage, 












15,000 00 




Oak Cottage, 












16,000 00 




Bowlder Cottage, 












17,000 00 




The Inn, 












1,000 00 




The Gables, 












9,000 00 




Bakery building, 












9,800 00 




School building, . 












40,900 00 




Laundry building, 












17,000 00 




Greenhouse, 












1,600 00 




Hen houses, 












1,000 00 




Tool house, Bowlder, 












- 20 00 




Scale house, 












400 00 




Piggery, . 












500 00 




Cow barn, , 












11,500 00 




Horse barn, 












2,700 00 




Hospital, 












12,000 00 




Berlin farmhouse, 












3,000 00 




Berlin barn, shed and tool 


louse 


'5 






1,500 00 




Subways, 










4,500 00 




Xew cottage, The Elms, 










6,200 00 








234,320 00 




Amount carried, forward, 


§258,589 00 






1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



Amount brought forward, §258,589 00 



Personal Property. 
Beds and bedding, 
Other furniture, . 
Carriages, .... 
Agricultural implements, . 
Drugs and surgical instruments, 

Fuel, 

Library, .... 
Live stock, .... 
Mechanical tools and appliances, 
Provisions and groceries, . 
Produce on hand, 
Ready-made clothing, 
Raw materials, . 



$6,505 

17,076 

982 

2,973 

52 40 

821 75 

2,504 38 

6,154 

23,838 

2,748 

7,782 

8,994 

3,145 



10 



83,577 97 



$342,166 97 



HENRY L. CHASE, 

Appraiser. 
A true copy. Attest: T. F. CHAPIN, Superintendent, 



74 



OFFICERS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



LIST OF SALARIED OFFICEES NOW 
EMPLOYED. 



Theodore F. Chapin, superintendent, 
Walter M. Day, assistant superintendent 
Lillie F. Wilcox, matron, . 
Harriet L. Day, amanuensis, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Hoyt, charge of family, 
Mr. and Mrs. C, A. Merrill, charge of family, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Keeler, charge of family and painter, 
Mr. and Mrs. Enoch Gerrish, charge of family 
Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Morton, charge of family and charge of 
laundry, . . . ... 

Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Wiggin, charge of family and tailor, 

, charge of family, .... 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Tilton, charge of family, . 

Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Lasselle, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Hennessey, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. Ira G. Dudley, charge of Berlin farmhouse 

Cora O. Dudley, assistant at Berlin farmhouse, 

Wm. G. Siddell, principal, . . . . 

Wm. J. Wilcox, instructor in carpentry and band, . 

James D. Littlefield, instructor in wood turning and iron 

Chas. W. Wilson, instructor in physical drill, . 

Vernon E. Backus, instructor in steam fitting and mason 

J. Joseph Farrell, instructor in printing, 

Anna L. Wilcox, teacher of sloyd, 

Mary F. Wilcox, teacher of sloyd, 

Fannie H. Wheelock, teacher of drawing 

Elizabeth R. Kimball, teacher of music, 

Emma J. McCue, teacher, . 

Emma F. Newton, teacher, 

Flora J. Dyer, teacher, 

Mary Knox, teacher, . 

Beatrice M. Backus, teacher, 

Harriet F. McCarty, teacher, 

Lydia R. Hiller, teacher, 

Ethel M. Watson, teacher, . 

Eldred A. Dibbell, charge of storeroom 



Amount carried forward, $25,050 00 



work 



work 



$2,700 00 


1,100 00 


300 00 


400 00 


800 00 


800 00 


800 00 


650 00 


900 00 


800 00 


800 00 


800 00 


800 00 


700 00 


1,000 00 


300 00 


1,000 00 


1,200 00 


1 1,200 00 


800 00 


600 00 


700 00 


800 00 


600 00 


600 00 


500 00 


300 00 


400 00 


400 00 


400 00 


300 00 


300 00 


400 00 


300 00 


600 00 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 75 

Amount brought forward, . $25,050 00 

Mr. and Mrs. F. P. Trask, charge of general kitchen, . . 900 00 

Susie E. Wheeler, housekeeper superintendent's house, . . 300 00 

Irving A. Nourse, engineer, . . . . . . . 800 00 

Eugene F. Temple, fireman, 360 00 

Leon Nourse, fireman, 360 00 

Everett G. Davis, farmer, 800 00 

Dennis E. Gardner, farm assistant, 360 00 

John B. Pearse, teamster, 324 00 

Lewis Wynott, driver, 400 00 

George L. Fuller, watchman, 400 00 

Thomas H. Ayer, M.D., physician, 600 00 

Arthur C. Jelly, M.D., specialist on feeble-minded, . . . 300 00 

Ernest P. Brigham, D.M.D., dentist, 800 00 

Alexander Quackenboss, M.D., oculist, 104 00 

May W. Hennessey, nurse, . ' . . . . . 400 00 

Ophelia B. Siddell, hospital matron, 250 00 

Vacation supplies, 1,500 00 

Extra trades teaching, . . . 1,958 00 

$35,466 00 
Probation Department. 

Walter A. Wheeler, superintendent, $1,700 00 

A. Frederick Howe, visitor, ........ 1,400 00 

Thomas Earle Babb, visitor, . 1,000 00 

John H. Cummings, truant and transportation officer, . . 800 00 

$4,900 00 
Advisory Physicians, unpaid. 

Dr. Orville F. Rogers. Dr. Richard C. Cabot. Dr. James S. Stone. 



76 STATISTICAL FORM LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 



STATISTICAL FORM FOR STATE 
INSTITUTIONS. 



[Prepared in accordance with a resolution of the National Conference of Charities and Cor- 
rections, adopted May 15, 1906.] 



Name of institution : Lyman School for Boys. 

Population, — Fourteen Months. 



Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Number of inmates present at beginning of 








fiscal year, 


330 


- 


330 


Number received during the year, 

Number discharged or died during the year, . 


404 


_ 


404 


389 


- 


389 


Number at end of the fiscal year, 


345 


- 


345 


Daily average attendance (i.e , number of in- 








mates actually present) during the year, 


338.13 


- 


338.13 


Average number of officers and employees 








during the year, 


61 


— 


61 



Number on visiting list of the probation department, . . 868 
Number coming of age within the year, and thus dropped from 

probation department, 182 

Employees of probation department, 4 



Expenditures, — Fourteen Months. 



Current expenses : — 

1. Salaries and wages, 

2. Clothing, 

3. Subsistence, 

4. Ordinary repairs, .... 

5. Office, domestic and out-door expenses, 

Total, 



$38,453 01 
9,306 55 

13,236 97 
7,606 78 

42,365 35 



$100,968 66 



Amount carried forward, $100,968 






1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 77 



Amount brought forward, .... 

Extraordinary expenses : — 

1. New buildings, land, etc., 

2. Permanent improvements to existing 

buildings, 

Total, 


$6,193 33 
5,531 58 


$100,968 66 
11,724 91 


$5,726 68 
4,778 54 
6,030 13 


Grand total for institution, . 

Probation Department. 
Salaries of visitors; . . . . 

Other expenses, 

Board of boys under fourteen, .... 
Total probation department, 


$112,693 57 
16,535 35 




Grand total, including probation, 


$129,228 92 






Notes on current expenses : — 

1. Salaries and wages should include salaries of trustees or directors, 

if any. 

2. Clothing includes shoes, and also materials for clothing and shoes if 

they are manufactured in the institution. 

4. Ordinary repairs include all of those which simply maintain the 

buildings in condition, without adding to them. Any repairs which 
are of the nature of additions should be classed with " permanent 
improvements " 

5. This item includes everything not otherwise provided for, e.g., fur- 

niture, bedding, laundry supplies, medicines, engineer's supplies, 
postage, freight, library, etc. 

Executive head of the institution (superintendent) : Theodore F. Chapin. 
Executive head of probation department : Walter A. Wheeler. 



Appendix C. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 

OF THE 

State Industrial School for Girls 

AT 

LANCASTER. 

1905-1906. 






SUPERINTENDENT'S KEPOET. 



lo the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

The past year stands by itself in its unprecedented number 
of commitments, 113 for twelve months and 126 for fourteen 
months, against 91 for the fourteen months preceding. The 
year opened with 209, closes with 221 ; maximum number 231, 
minimum 195, average 214. Number leaving the school on 
probation or otherwise, 263; recalled, 150. With an increase 
in average from last year of 6 there is a slight decrease in the 
per capita cost; a gross weekly per capita of $4.33 gross, 
$4.31 net, against $4.35 gross, $4.33 net, of last year. 

Scarcely less marked than its numbers are the extreme qual- 
ities of its commitments, calling for the finest distinction in and 
handling of our classification. It has been a matter of inter- 
esting study and comment that our distinct cottage life has 
made it possible in the same institution, under the same gen- 
eral policy, to so deal with the individual groups as to reconcile 
these same extremes. 

From an economic standpoint the year has been a good one. 
Notwithstanding the daily maintenance of the increased num- 
bera of both girls and officers; the fitting out of the large 
number of the newly committed and increased numbers of 
those placed out ; together with the very material outlay in 
clothing made necessary by the girls going into town for Sun- 
day church service, higher prices in clothing materials, — cir- 
cumstances calling for an expenditure in these supplies of 
nearly double that of former years; ordinary repairs and fur- 
nishings of permanent value far beyond that of average years, 
— the closing month shows a good supply of " stock on hand," 
and a clean account with the State treasury. 

Again, notwithstanding large expenditures in farm tools and 
unusual cost of labor on land improvements, return- from the 



82 SUPT.'S REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

latter of which must be a matter of a few years, the farm figures 
a profit of $1,833.60. During the past two years 15 acres of 
formerly unusable land have been brought under cultivation. 
There are under tillage to-day 75 acres, 40 of which were the 
past year under high cultivation, 10 sown to oats, 15 planted to 
corn, 10 to potatoes and 5 for garden product. While the soil 
is not adapted to an abundant potato crop, 1,300 bushels have 
been stored for the year's consumption. The corn crop was 
enormous. Besides an abundant supply for all during the 
summer and early fall, the gardens have yielded vegetables 
sufficient for the whole year's supply. The Bolton gardens 
alone have made return of thousands of quarts of blackberries, 
strawberries, raspberries, currants, gooseberries and other small 
fruits, the culture and harvesting largely the hand work of the 
girls. From the 35 acres of grass have been cut and housed 80 
tons of hay. 

The new cow barn has made possible an attempt to raise our 
own dairy herd. During the past two years there have been 
added to the same 19 head of young heifers, 8 of which will 
increase our milk supply of the coming summer. The 35 cows 
show a profit for the year of $1,049 ; the hens, $239, 80 cents 
per head; the hogs, $335.97. 

The capital work of the girls at Bolton under the manage- 
ment of the foreman is worthy of special mention. Added to 
the small fruitage has been the raising of vegetables of all sorts 
sufficient for the consumption of the two Bolton cottages, all 
of which, with the exception of the first preparation of the 
land, has been largely the work of the girls. Fifteen hundred 
heads of celery of fine growth are also the product of the Bolton 
gardens. I would recommend later the transfer to this part of 
the institution of the hen houses, and that the raising of fowls 
be made more and more a special feature of the Bolton cot- 
tage. Bearing always in mind that the Bolton girls as a rule 
have received a full term of training at the school proper, no 
attempt has been made there to provide the elaborate plant. 
The problem there will always be how to give the variety of 
wholesome employment to the young woman whose natural 
capacity and ambitions must be temporarily limited by her 
moral weaknesses and consequent need of restraint. The di- 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 83 

rected outlet of such will power and energy as produced last 
summer the Bolton garden must be to us a continuing problem, 
and one not yet solved. 

Under special appropriation for 1906, Elm Cottage, our 
oldest cottage, has been made one of the most liveable and 
attractive family houses on the grounds. The roof has been 
renewed ; schoolroom and living rooms remodelled and win- 
dows added ; the dining room and kitchen enlarged, relighted 
and refitted ; closets added ; a large part of plastering through- 
out the cottage renewed ; new hard- wood floors laid ; and the 
entire house retinted. 

With the renovation of two years ago, the renewed excellent 
plumbing of last year and the cementing this fall of basements, 
the four older cottages compare well with the new. From 
point of size, the former have advantage. From careful com- 
parison, I am convinced of the value of the work in the smaller 
groups over the larger. 

Another special appropriation provided $500 for equipping 
a central bread kitchen and laundry, — the former old hospital. 
At a former expenditure of $500, two years ago, this little, 
one-storied, three-roomed building was moved to the present 
site. Partitions were torn out, throwing the entire space into 
one large, airy kitchen, pantries added, the building raised and 
a brick basement placed, affording for laundry below the same 
space as for the kitchen above. A new chimney, affording 
flues sufficient for both, was built, and the building plumbed. 
This year the $500 has been made to cover ranges, shelvings 
and cupboards, tables, and bread-making equipments for the 
bread kitchen ; in the laundry, soap-stone tubs and placing of 
same; hot water tank, ironing stove, set brick boiler, tables, 
racks, ironing boards, arrangement for drying, etc. Here the 
cottage kitchen training for each girl is supplemented by a 
month's individual attention to bread making, and the same to 
finished laundry. Keeping close to the thought of fitting the 
girl for practical home duties, the details of both departments 
have been so arranged as to meet that need. The girls come 
together here, one from each cottage. Each girl in the bread 
kitchen has her own bread pans, sets her own bread sponge, 
for the time being owns and manages her own range. From 



84 SUPT.'S REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

the first process, until the finished loaf is taken from the oven, 
she is made supremely responsible for her part. The same 
thought of individualization is given the laundry, fitted, and 
the work carried on, as in any well-ordered family kitchen. 
The drying arrangements are only the crude clothesline in the 
open, where there must be the same contentions with wind and 
weather. Certainly the work done here cannot fail to prove 
valuable in the training of these prospective household helpers, 
and later hoped-for housewives and mothers among people. 
And this at only a cost to the State of $1,000 in building and 
equipment. 

The early fall marked the completion of the new silo. 

The new storehouse and cold storage, being built at a pro- 
posed cost of $5,000, with an estimated saving on meats and 
other food materials of at least $1,000 per annum, represents 
a good investment. 

The various departments of the institution have been on the 
whole well sustained. With most excellent supervision, the 
disadvantages of the mixed-grade cottage schoolroom, an out- 
come of our system of classification according to a moral rather 
than school standing, are constantly facing us. Already two 
grades have been provided for; that of , the backward girl, 
segregated in our Mary Lamb cottage ; and that of an ad- 
vanced class under a special teacher, two or three girls from 
each cottage coming together for three hours for advanced work 
peculiar to their capacity. 

The work in sloyd continues to vitally hold the interest 
of the girls. 

In music, and in our attempts for physical culture and sports, 
we are heavily handicapped. The little chapel — our only cen- 
tral place of assembly — has served as chapel, entertainment 
hall, general assembly room and gymnasium. As an assembly 
room, with our growing numbers, it is inadequate ; as an enter- 
tainment hall, it lacks both space and equipment ; as a gymna- 
sium, it can be only a pretense. 

The work of the hospital has been characterized this year, as 
last, by the same excellent work under the same management. 
The physician's report shows the personal attention daily given 
by Mrs. Church in hospital and cottage. 

The arrangements for dentistry have been most satisfactory. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 85 

With the two days a week we are able to care for every new 
girl as she comes in, to keep watch of any new development, 
and to send her out with teeth in good temporary condition. 
Considering the deplorable condition of many who come to us, 
this is a large undertaking. The combined expenditure for 
dentistry this year has been $641.35 ; but to those who have 
watched the moral reaction upon the girl, the sum seems amply 
justified. 

Less extensive but with like earnestness has special attention 
been given the eye, ear and throat. Since July 1 every new 
commitment has been examined during the first month's stay 
in the institution. It is a suggestive fact in the study of 
delinquency that nearly two-thirds of these are found suffering 
under defective eyesight, together with a large per cent, of 
affected throats and ears. The one visit a month is wholly 
inadequate for systematically treating these numbers, — an in- 
justice both to the girl and the work undertaken. 

While the work of the Mary Lamb cottage is yet rudimen- 
tary, returns are being made on the three-years observation 
and methods in dealing with these girls ; perhaps feeble minds ; 
perhaps „only so called backwards ; possible border line cases 
for the Waverley institution. To those closest in daily con- 
tact with these, under certain methods it is being demonstrated 
pretty conclusively that the larger number are these question- 
able cases. They are often those who by force of environment, 
and sometimes heredity, have all their lifetime been so bound 
down and hedged about as to be in a condition of moral and 
mental stupor. They are stolid ; they are backward. They 
are the individuals to whom the instruction must be given over 
and over again ; who must have a longer training ; whose re- 
sponsibility must be developed by long and specialized train- 
ing; in fact, just such a quality as are to be found in the 
backward classes of our public school, but behind whom, in 
the latter case, is the respectable parent who will support the 
feeble knees until stronger. By the longer training these arc 
found to be fairly efficient in the domestic department of the 
school ; and, while the outside forces a many-more-sided prob- 
lem, such girls should during their minority be carefully 
placed out prior to a final decision as to commitment to the 
School for the Feeble-minded. 



86 SUPT.'S EEPORT INDUSTL SCHOOL. [Dec. 

That the girl while under the protection of the institution 
may become more and more fitted into the community, and for 
the impulse in thus breaking the week's routine, last summer, 
arrangements were made for church attendance in the town. 
The kindly co-operation of the clergy and town's people has 
simplified and lessened to a large degree an attempt which, in 
its constructive period, loomed a large undertaking. The girls 
show their appreciation most materially in their response to 
every demand, and have gained a certain feeling of kinship 
to the community in thus identifying themselves with it. Sub- 
ject to interruptions because of weather, we hope to make the 
summer also a winter plan. 

For the coming year our increasing number calls for a new 
cottage. The gravest danger of such growth lies in incapacity 
through lack of accommodations in careful housing. Two and 
three girls in a room are incompatible to the best results. It 
had better be an open dormitory than the double room. 

As has already been suggested, the need for a gymnasium 
and central assembly room is an urgent one. 

Our new storehouse, furnishing cold storage, meat and gen- 
eral storerooms, is useless without equipments. The/ concrete 
walks must be in part renewed. 

In the reformatory processes, the policy of the past year 
largely repeats that of former years. With the thought that 
to attempt to deal with a problem without knowing the causes 
which combine to produce it is taking a leap in the dark, there 
has been an attempt to study more and more closely the con- 
ditions of home surrounding, heredity and social influences 
which force the girl to us : the cause determined, to individ- 
ualize. In three-fourths of the cases we find ourselves tackling 
a reform which should have begun two generations ago. It is 
only the exceptional girl who comes to us from the decent 
home : if decent, its moral backbone so pliable as to result in 
a defined moral spinal curvature in the child, whose degen- 
eracy is a consequence of a natural following the line of least 
resistance. In the main, we are dealing with the abnormals, 
the outcasts from various social strata, often the experiments of 
former reformatory and child-saving attempts. AYe are not 
seeking to evolve the method which shall best fit the institu- 
tion as a whole, or even the family group as a group, but that 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 87 

individual method which shall find response in the need of the 

individual girl. M is devoting the largest quota of her time 

to sloyd, not because of certainty in the mind of the teacher 

that M will succeed in her ambition to become a sloyd 

teacher, but because in this work she is developing her largest 
self in reaching toward her present highest ideal. "Whatever 

M may eventually work out as her horizon lifts, at present 

she is finding her largest growth in chasing her rainbow. Thus 
it is with yet another in sloyd, another in nursing, another in 
the bread kitchen. 

Despite the temptation to keep pace with the popularly elab- 
orate institution, in which the domestic seems swallowed up in 
the educational, we are continuing to give to the girl whose 
vital lack has been the home, the home instinct. Every force 
is made to emphasize the home ; to develop in the girl the 
desire for a decent home of her own ; to introduce into each 
cottage every little homely process which shall foster such de- 
sire ; to demonstrate the vocation of woman as a home maker, 
the nobility of common home duties and the strong moral ele- 
ment in the habit of honest labor. 

From the first moment of the girl's stay in the institution 
there is the attempt that she be made to feel her detention there 
an opportunity, rather than a punishment ; to feel herself a 
part of the institution, its reputation and standard her respon- 
sibility ; especially to foster pride in her own family group. 
If the spirit of her cottage is superior to that of any other cot- 
tage, it is because she helps to make it so. 

The spirit which has characterized the year's work has been 
made possible only through a splendid force of earnest officers, 
and a certain encouragement which comes from a sense of sym- 
pathetic endorsement on the part of the public. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FANNIE FRENCH MORSE, 

Su2)eri?Uendenl. 



88 PHYSICIAN'S REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 



PHYSICIAN'S KEPOET. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

There are 221 girls at the school, — about the same average 
as last year. Of these, we have examined 126 new commit- 
ments, and nearly all the returned girls. Of the new girls, 8 
were detained at the hospital for scabies ; 9 for other skin dis- 
eases or filthy conditions. Including these cases, there were 
47 girls treated in the wards, covering a total of one hundred 
and fourteen weeks. 

There were 2 cases of typhoid during the year, 1 of which, 
we regret, was fatal ; 1 case of diphtheria at the hospital and 
2 at Bolton annex ; 8 cases of incontinence of urine ; 1 of in- 
cipient phthisis ; 2 chorea ; 1 hysteria ; 3 metrorrhagia ; 8 ton- 
silitis ; 5 enlarged cervical and submaxillary glands ; 1 erythema 
nodosum; 2 impetigo; 3 rheumatism; 27 specific diseases, of 
which 18 were new and 9 returned girls ; 9 pregnant (3 of 
these were pregnant when committed) 6 of which are at the 
school at present. Of the other 3 pregnant girls, 1 was de- 
livered at the Bolton farmhouse by another physician, and 2 
girls were boarded out. 

We are indebted to the Carney Hospital for a successful 
surgical operation on a tubercular hip case which was referred 
there ; also, for a similar favor in a tubercular myelitis case ; 
and to Clinton Hospital for an appendectomy. The patients 
returned to us for convalescence. One girl was admitted to 
the Rutland Sanatorium ; she had been an invalid since child- 
hood. Two girls were transferred from Bolton annex to 
Tewksbury, suffering with advanced specific disease. 

All new commitments are referred to the dentist and oculist, 
and the latter's report is appended. The resident nurse, in 
addition to labors of bathing and shampooing each new comer, 
and administering to the many demands of the school, has, 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 89 

with the exception of two cases, where we felt assistance was 
imperative, cared for all the medical cases at the hospital. 

Added to these duties, a record of 840 visits for minor ail- 
ments, slight accidents or special treatment, hardly covers the 
actual work done by her in the past fourteen months. To her 
kindness and sympathy the girls are under obligations for many 
little favors, and much of our success has been due to her 
hearty co-operation. 

At present but one bed is occupied in the wards by a patient, 
and that is in the isolation department, but we have been han- 
dicapped many times because the furnishings have not yet been 
completed. Two girls became ill with diphtheria at the Bolton 
annex. The matron graciously consented to care for them 
unless serious symptoms developed, and with her valuable 
assistance and prompt prophylactic measures we were able to 
restrict the number of cases to the two original ones. The 
house was quarantined and later fumigated. Very soon a case 
of diphtheria appeared at Lancaster. The girl was removed to 
the hospital, and we soon found it was inexpedient to quaran- 
tine our resident nurse, so another was secured. We repeated 
the precautions we advised at Bolton, — shampooing the hair 
and gargling the throat of each girl on the grounds daily. 
The throat of every girl at the school was carefully examined, 
but no suspicious cases discovered. At Fisher Hall, where the 
girl was taken ill, more radical measures were resorted to, each 
inmate being injected with antitoxin. The house was quaran- 
tined until the danger of contagion had passed, and the house 
fumigated. During the scare no girls were placed out. As a 
safeguard to the public this precaution seemed wise. No new 
cases developed, and our patient awaits a favorable report on 
the last culture. We have had an unusual number of com- 
plaints of constipation, but with more regular gymnastic 
exercise and increased laxative diet, this condition should be 
material \y lessened. 

Yours respectful ly, 



Worcester, Dec. 8, 1906. 



CLARA P. FITZGERALD, 

Physician. 



90 OCULIST'S REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 



EEPORT OF THE OCULIST AND AURIST. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

The field of " preventive medicine "is not now limited to 
the elimination of contagious diseases alone. The chairman 
of the committee on physical welfare of the school children of 
New York says : ' « The early detection and treatment of one 
school child with enlarged and weakened tonsils might easily 
prevent the spread of diphtheria in a school of two thousand." 
The cure of persistent headache, general malaise and other 
symptoms, by properly fitted and adjusted glasses, is also in 
line for a place in the ranks of preventive medicine ; and, like- 
wise, the purulent discharge of the middle ear, or the frequent 
attacks of " sore throat," which are cured by the removal of 
tonsils or adenoids, or both, may also come under this head. 

The particular work done by this department in preventive 
medicine has been with the new comers. Since July 1 of this 
year we have tested the vision and hearing and inspected the 
nose and throat of all commitments, in addition to the usual 
number of patients sent for treatment of some defect of these 
organs. There were 45 commitments from July 1 to December 
1 ; of this number, more than 50 per cent, had defective vision, 
ranging from almost normal to approximate blindness. 

One case may serve to illustrate how great the trouble may 
be without anxiety on the part of the subject. B — D — , 
sixteen years of age, of good physical appearance, in reply to 
the question, "Is your sight good?" answered, "Oh, yes; 
pretty good." She then gave a negative history as to head- 
aches, difficulty in reading or sewing, etc. When told to read 
the card, we found that she was obliged to go within three feet 
of the top letter in order to read it. The normal eye reads 
this letter at two hundred feet. With the left eye she read 
this letter at fifteen feet. Glasses will remedy the defect. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 91 

Before prescribing glasses, two tests are made, one with 
drops in the eyes, the second when the effect of the drops is 
gone. Total number of eye tests: for vision only, 94; for 
glasses, 33. 

One-fourth of the commitments from July 1 were defective 
in hearing, and in most cases the patient denied ear trouble of 
any kind. Total number of ear cases : examined, 54 ; treated, 
16. 

One-sixth of the recent commitments had nasal obstruc- 
tion, enlarged tonsils, adenoids or throat trouble. Examined, 
62; treated, 19. Operations: removal of tonsils, single, 2; 
double, 6 ; total, 8. Adenoids, 3. Total number of opera- 
tions, 11. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. F. O'CONNOR, M.D. 



92 VISITATION KEPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF 

THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

PROBATIONERS. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

At the end of each year we go over the girls' records, to 
sum up in our tables the results of our work. It is a most 
encouraging task. Day by day we have been faced by crises 
actual or impending. We have been struggling to help the 
girl with an uncontrolled temper, a long-established habit of 
petty thieving, sexual weakness or a lack of ambition to be 
like other people. Character forms slowly, and, although a 
girl may be in the main improving, she will have upsets and 
troubles that would be disastrous without some one to sympa- 
thize and to guide her safely. Often the girl who is in the 
most hot water is the finest in the end, for all the splashing 
around means no inertia. The typical prostitute is contented 
and soft. We are glad of minor difficulties, for each one met 
under a good visitor means a real lesson in life mastered. 
Although we are very conscious of the girls who are doing 
well, and although their success gives us confidence, we are 
always grappling with the problem of the girl who is not gain- 
ing ground. She is the one we must talk about when we see 
the trustees or any one who can give us advice or inspiration. 
A lady stopped me on the street recently, saying: "I won't 
keep you a minute, — but Esther is a treasure, and as happy 
as she can be. You hear so much of the other side, I wanted 
to tell you this for a change." All the year long the trustees 
have had nothing but the knotty problems, what is uppermost 
in our minds ; and now, in the general summary of the year's 
work, I am going to tell of what is underneath, — a strong feel- 
ing of satisfaction at the wonderful progress made by the majority 
of the girls. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 18. 93 

Of the 90 x girls coming of age during the past fourteen 
months, 66 girls, or 73 per cent., were counted as living 
respectably. Much more could have been said of the girl who 
wrote the following letter : — 

Dear Miss Dewson : — ... You wanted me to tell you more 
about my husband. Well to tell you the truth, I don't know how to, 
because I can't find words to describe him. I only know that he has 
made me a very happy person. There is nothing but what he will do 
for me, and that is enough to make anyone happy to know that some 
one will care for them no matter what happens. I used to be quite 
lonesome this winter, as he used to go away at six o'clock in the 
morning and didn't get back until six at night. He was cutting logs, 
but now he is cutting firewood for ourselves, enough to last a year, 
and so he is at home more. He is at home to dinner, and I just tell 
you it makes any woman pleased when her husband tells her she is a 
nice cook, and if I hadn't been to Lancaster, he probably wouldn't 
tell that I am a good cook, as I couldn't cook but a very little when 
I went there. One thing that has pleased me more than anything 
else this winter is that my father has a new housekeeper. I am truly 
thankful for my dear little brothers' sakes. The other housekeeper 
that he had so long wasn't good to them, — she ill-used them, and I 
felt that I was to blame because if I had stayed at home and behaved 
myself, they wouldn't have had to have any stranger with them. Oh 
if all the girls could see things in the right way there wouldn't be any 
bad girls. I'm glad that my eyes are opened. The other house- 
keeper was the cause of my being sent to Lancaster. I hate her for 
that. Of course I know I was to blame and it helped me, but every 
girl realizes that it isn't an honor to be sent to Lancaster. I will 
now tell you about my home. We have six rooms. We only use 
four at present, but this summer 1 shall fix up one more bed room as 
my sister expects to visit me. Fred says he probably will come too, 
but he said he was coming last summer, but he didn't. Well what a 
long letter 1 am writing, but I must tell you what we intend to do 
this fall. There is a piece of land near here, right next to Aunt L's 
home, and George is going to buy it soon as this fall he is going to 
have a little home built for us. Won't that be fine? Something 
to call one's own. Oh if I could only get as long a letter in return 
for this from you. 

Lovingly, . 

1 Not counting the 5 who are mentally defective. 



94 VISITATION REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

There are half a. dozen others of substantial New England 
stock who will make fine citizens. It is a significant fact that 
in each of these cases one parent had died before the girl's 
commitment. Most of these particular girls are married, but 
one, now in her twenty-second year, is finishing the high school 
course, among the first in her class. After a long pull she real- 
ized the value of training a good mind, and that it was not too 
late to begin. Her interest in her work is keeping her from a 
flighty sister who has been the great danger. We do not en- 
courage girls to go to school unless their ability is considerable 
or their desire strong. The unbalanced nature that sent them 
to Lancaster needs the real discipline of life which they do not 
get in school. They do not want more training for life. They 
crave actual work, the earning of money, responsibility, and 
the trying out of their new ideas. Later, when the first unrest 
is worn off and the girl gets adjusted, she may be able to go 
on with her education successfully. One of our girls after 
three years at housework was almost forced by her visitor to 
go to high school. She did splendidly in her studies, and all 
the finest girls were her friends. Now she is holding a re- 
sponsible position in a large office, and no one could be more 
steady-going, sensible and self-respecting. 

These are girls of exceptional possibilities ; but there are 
many others who are doing as well as they could had they 
always been under the most favorable circumstances. The 
very fighting through so much trouble has been developing. 
One girl who was perfect at the school was allowed to go home. 
Her people had turned over a new leaf for many months, in the 
hope of getting her. The incentive removed, they fell back into 
disorderly ways, and the girl with them. In the nick of time 
she was started afresh at housework in a family. Minor ups 
and downs followed, for she was attractive to boys, and was 
engaged twice. In both cases the young men jilted her. The 
second time was when the family had taken her to the moun- 
tains on their vacation, and, the visitor out of reach, she took 
Paris green. Her life was saved, but she was much disheart- 
ened. Without family or lover, her visitor was her only com- 
fort. A slender thread, it was enough to hold her until new 
associations and friends were formed. She became an attendant 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 95 

in a hospital, and married an enterprising fellow attendant who 
was soon to set up as a photographer. Later, when of age, she 
came into the office for advice about her husband, who had ty- 
phoid fever. There she saw two of our young girls who were 
evidently in a peck of trouble. She looked at them intelli- 
gently, and said, in a most elderly, responsible way, "Poor 
things ! I outgrew all that long ago, didn't I?" Not one of 
her relatives is half the woman. 

Some of the girls are so crude that small results are the best 
we can hope for. Like their parents, they will always be 
ignorant, with a low standard of life. Our ambition is to 
get them on a level with the best of their own people, — that 
is, decent morally, and able to earn their own living. 

A few girls every year are sent back to the school for un- 
chaste conduct. When a girl has been living an immoral life 
for possibly two or three years before coming to Lancaster, 
and her sensibilities in that respect are blunted, and she has 
been for a year or so in seclusion at the school, is it to be won- 
dered at that when she comes back to life — and life is tempta- 
tion — she does not make effort enough to resist, and has to be 
returned to our school for a fresh start? There is no public 
opinion of community or friends to restrain her, nothing to be 
forfeited. There is not the barrier of " I have never done this 
before" to leap. The slips are not the things to count. We 
may hope, if she is growing in positive ways, that, with the 
growth of power to resist, temptation also will be less. Take 
these instances : one girl came to the school for stealing dress- 
maker's materials. She had been unchaste. She was tried at 
home with her respectable parents. She behaved worse than 
before, but they lied about it, with mistaken affection, until 
she ran away from home. Months later she was re-arrested, 
having become a better-class notorious prostitute. After a 
second period at the school she was placed in a country dress- 
maker's family, doing sewing chiefly, but helping a little with 
the housework. She became trusty, and in time was pro- 
moted to a city dressmaker's, again living at home. Later she 
married the man with whom she had gone before she first 
came to the school. They spent $500 to furnish the home, in 
which they take great pride. She now makes its much as her 



96 VISITATION REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

husband by doing dressmaking on her own account in their 
apartment. 

Another girl was sent back to the school twice for unchas- 
tity. She had an illegitimate child the second time. The 
baby absorbed her mind, energy and affection. She supported 
herself by working in families, so that the baby could be with 
her. At the end of two years she married an honest laboring 
man, who was a few years older. They have another baby 
now, but the first is just as much loved. None of our girls 
are happier or more proud of their home. 

In another case the girl was committed at fifteen years of 
age. Her child, born at the State Hospital at Tewksbury, 
died a few months later. When she was placed out, she led 
her visitor a dance. She did not like to work, she wanted 
pretty clothes, she complained of all the little outs in the 
places and in the personalities of her employers, not to mention 
the main difficulty, — that she could not be trusted where men 
were concerned. After a long tussle she began to settle down, 
and she had a young man to keep company with her in what 
seemed a safe way. He left town when he got her into 
trouble. Later, before confinement, they were married. They 
began housekeeping in another town on her savings. After a 

year and a half our visitor writes : " Mr. H earns $17 a 

week. They live in a new house, having four rooms and 
a bath, which are cozy, pretty, comfortable and immaculately 
clean. They expect a baby next month, and seem to be very 
happy and to be getting along nicely. The little girl is a 

healthy buster of a baby, and Mr. H is very fond of her. 

They own everything they have now, and the house is well 
furnished, muslin curtains, a nice dining room with a white 
table cloth, pretty dishes, and a shining stove." 

For such work a visitor must have understanding of girls 
and life, and be able to arouse and hold a girl to her best. 
These qualities are gifts of character, and need not necessarily 
be found in one who might have, nevertheless, an intellectual 
comprehension of our work. The well-meaning effort of the 
Civil Service Commission, in putting our visitors on the certi- 
fied list, has been disastrous. Two vacancies, caused by mar- 
riage and resignation, occurring in the early summer, remain 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 97 

unfilled at the writing of our report. The crisis coming in the 
vacation season, only the devotion and overdoing of the re- 
maining visitors enabled the work to go on at all. In June 
we were proud of the standard, the spirit and the effectiveness 
of our force. Now, although the strongest workers remain, 
we are disorganized and overtaxed, and when our force is com- 
plete, one-half of our girls will be under untrained visitors. 
A year's training for a visitor is needed before telling work 
can be done. For the good of the service there ought to be 
but one visitor in training at any one time. 

In the statistical tables (pages 99-118) the facts concerning 
every girl under twenty-one years are recorded. 

The work of our office during the past fourteen months, 
exclusive of volunteer assistance, is outlined in the following 
statement : — 

Girls taken to new places, 82 times. 

Girls seen in places, 1,472 times. 

Girls seen in their homes, 291 times. 

Girls seen elsewhere, 640 times. 

Girls escorted, 991 times. 

Work hunted with girls, 30 times. 

Work found, other than housework, 28 times. 

Boarding places found for girls at work, 19 

Weddings arranged, 2 

Shopping with girls, 161 times. 

Homes visited with girls, 26 times. 

Funerals attended with girls, 3 

Hospital cases, 222 

Girls taken to physicians, 88 times. 

Girls taken to dentists, 54 times. 

Legal cases, 4 

Court cases, 15 

Girls committed to School for Feeble-minded and to insane 

asylums, 4 

Runaways hunted, 61 times. 

Runaways found, not counting those found by police, . . 24 

Parents or relatives seen, 518 times. 

Homes reported on, 95 

Places reported on, 397 

Other people interviewed, 1,456 times. 

Errands, finding trunks, depositing savings, etc., . . . 296 

New volunteer visitors enlisted, 9 



98 VISITATION REPOKT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

Our expenses for the fourteen months were as follows : — 

Salaries, $6,084 55 

Travelling expenses (officers), 2,259 13 

Office expenses : — 

Rent, $350 00 

Clerk and stenographer. .... 857 83 

Telephone, 466 91 

Supplies, . . . 923 14 

Furniture, 207 25 

2,805 13 

Total expended for visiting, $11,148 81 

Travelling expenses (girls), |990 31 

Board, 308 74 

Clothing 161 61 

Hospitals, medicine, etc., 644 07 

Part expense in getting divorce, .... 5 59 

Total expended for girls, 2,110 32 



Grand total, $13,259 13 

Kespectfully submitted, 

MAEY W. DEWSON, 

Superintendent of Probationers for the State Industrial School. 

DEC. 1, 1906. 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



99 



STATISTICS CONCERNING GIELS. 



Table I. 

Showing Total Number in Custody of the State Industrial School, both 
Inside Institution and Outside. 

In the school Sept. 30, 1905, 209 

Outside the school, and either on probation, in other institutions, or 

whereabouts unknown, 324 

Total in custody Sept. 30, 1905, 533 

Since committed, 126 

659 

Attained majority, 88 

Died, 3 

" Honorably discharged" from custody for good conduct, . . 4 

Total who passed out of custody, .... ... 95 

Total in custody Nov. 30, 1906, 564 

Net increase within fourteen months, 31 



Table II. 

Showing Status, Nov. 30, 1906, of All Girls in Custody of the State Indus- 
trial School, being All those committed to the School who are under 
Twenty-one. 

On probation with relatives, 53 

On probation with relatives out of New England, . . .21 

On probation in families, earning wages, 140 

At work elsewhere, not living with relatives, .... 8 
At academy or other school, self-supporting, 1 .... 2 

Married, but subject to recall for cause, 59 

Left home or place, whereabouts unknown, 5 .... 32 
Discharged from Reformatory Prison, since Sept. 30, 1905, . 2 

2 



Discharged from Reformatory Prison, former years, 
In the school Nov. 30, 1906, 



319 3 
221 



1 Occasional help with clothing. 

2 Three ran away from the State Hospital, 1 never having been on probation ; 4 
escaped from the school, never having been on probation. 

3 Four hundred and thirty-one had been on probation for part or all of the four- 
teen months. 



100 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



Table II. — Concluded. 
In other institutions : — 

Temporary home, 1 

Hospital 2 

Insane asylum, 7 

School for the Feeble-minded, sent former years, ... 7 

School for the Feeble-minded, sent since Sept. 30, 1905, 1 . 5 

Reformatory Prison, sent since Sept. 30, 1905, .... 2 



24 



Total in custody Nov. 30, 1906, 



564 



Table III. 

Showing the Number coming into and going from the School. 

In the school Sept. 30, 1905, 209 

Since committed, 126 



Recalled to school : — 
For change of place, 
For a visit, 

From a visit to her home, 
Pending legal proceedings, 
On account of illness, . 
From hospital, 
For observation as to sanity 
To commit to School for the Feeble-minded 
For running away or planning to run, . 

For larceny, 

Because unsatisfactory, 
Because in danger of unchaste conduct, 3 
For unchaste conduct, 4 .... 
At husband's request, 6 .... 



dividual 
Girls. 

9 


2 

20 


15 


19 


1 


1 


- 


1 


12 


14 


5 


6 


- 


1 


2 


2 


8 


10 


1 


3 


17 


20 


15 


15 


32 


33 


4 


4 



335 



149 



121 



484 



1 One was on probation 4 years, 26 days ; one 1 year, 5 months. 

2 Counting each individual under most serious cause for return during the last 
fourteen months. 

3 Six were in their homes ; 2 had run home from their places ; 1 had run from her 
place ; 5 were in places ; 1 was working by day, living in selected boarding place. 

4 One had run from her home ; 2 were in their homes ; 11 ran from their places ; 
17 were in places ; 2 had escaped from the school ; 4 per cent, of all in homes ; 19 
per cent, of all in places. 

5 Three were surely unchaste. 

6 Recalled girls : 97 were recalled once within the last fourteen months ; 20 twice ; 
4 three times. 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



101 



Table III.— Concluded 
Released from school : — 

On probation to parents or relatives, . 

On probation at work other than housework, 

On probation to other families for wages, . 

On probation to other families earning board 

going to school, . 
Boarded out, .... 
Married, .... 
Ran from the Industrial School, 
Transferred to a hospital, 
Transferred to School for the Feeble-minded, 
Transferred to Reformatory Prison, 
Died . 



and 



Remaining in the school Nov. 30, 1906, 



Individual l 
Girls. 

32 


34 


11 


13 


149 


190 


5 


6 


1 


2 


1 


1 


4 


5 


4 


6 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 
213 


1 
263 2 

221 



Table IV. 

Showing Length of Training in the School before Girls were placed out on 
Probation for the First Time. 



In places : — 



1 girl, 

2 girls, 

3 girls, 



ft 
1 girl 

ft 

g 



3 girls, 
1 girl, 

4 girls, 
7 girls, 
4 girls, 
9 girls, 

1 girls, 
4 girls, 

2 girls, 
45 girls. 



Years. Months. 

10 



under 2 years. 



11 

2 

3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 



2 girls, 






2 girls, 






2 girls, 






1 girl, 






2 girls, 






1 girl, 






3 girls, . 






1 girl, 






2 girls, 






2 girls, 






1 girl, 






1 girl, 






2 1 girls, 






l 4 girl, 






l girl, 






l girl, 






25 girls, 2 years and 



Years. Months. 

2 



over. 



1 

2 
3 
5 

6 

7 

9 

10 

11 

1 

2 

5 

9 

11 

9 



70 6 girls, on an average of 1 year, I months, 15 days. 



1 Counting each Individual under hex most recent release. 

2 Released girls: 168 went out once within tin- last fourteen months; 4'.» twice; 5 
three times. 

1 One of whom was feeble-minded. [feeble-minded. 

: ' Ten returned sinoe for unchaste conduct; 5 because in darner of unchaste con- 
duct;."? at lar^o of whom l bad been tried unsuccessfully at home; or 26 per cent, 
of the 70 girls. 



102 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Dec, 



Table IV. — Concluded. 



With friends : — 












Years. 


Months. 




Years. 


Months. 


3 1 girls, . 


. 


2 


1 girl, . 


1 


8 


1 girl, 




. 


9 


3 2 girls, . 


1 


10 


1 girl, 




1 


- 


1 girl, . 


2 


5 


1 girl, 




1 


3 


1 girl, . 


2 


7 


3 girls, 




1 


5 


1 girl, . 


3 


- 


2 girls, 




1 


6 


I 3 girl, 


3 


9 


1 girl, 




1 


7 


1 girl, . . 


4 


1 



21 4 girls, on an average of 1 year, 8 months, 11 days. 

1 One to relatives in New York ; 1 was very homesick and in poor physical con- 
dition ; 1 was so ill with syphilis she was expected to die. 

2 One of whom was feeble-minded. 3 Feeble-minded. 

4 Two returned since for unchaste conduct ; 1 because in danger of unchaste 
conduct, or 14 per cent, of the 21 girls. Two of these girls were feeble-minded; 1 
had been expected to die of sy nilis. 

Table V. 

Showing Length of Time Outside the School of all Girls returned for 
Serious Cause during the Past Fourteen Months who were out on Pro- 
bation for the First Time and had been out less than Twelve Months. 



Recalled for unchaste conduct : — 


Recalled because in danger of un- 


2 


girls under 1 month. 


chaste conduct : — 


2 


girls over 1 month. 


3 girls under 1 month. 


2 


girls over 2 months. 


1 girl over 2 months. 


2 


girls over 3 months. 


1 girl over 4 months. 


1 


girl over 5 months. 


1 girl over 6 months. 


1 


girl over 6 months. 


1 girl over 8 months. 


2 


girls over 7 months. 


1 girl over 11 months. 


2 


girls over 8 months. 


— 


1 


girl over 9 months. 


8 2 


— 




Ran away and have not been 


15 




found : — 

2 after over 1 month. 
1 after over 10 months. 

3 3 



1 Forty-three per cent, of the 35 girls returned for unchaste conduct during the 
past fourteen months. One was at home. Of the 14 who had been in places, 6 had 
run away from their places ; 1 of these afterwards marrying and continuing to do 
wrong. 

2 Four were in places, 4 had run from their places. 
8 Two of these we have heard are doing badly. 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



103 



Table VI. 

Showing Length of Training in the School before Seventy-eight Girls who 
had been recalled ivere placed out on Probation again during the Past 
Fourteen Months} 



Recalled for unchaste conducl 




Recalled for larceny : — 




Mos. 


Days. 


Mos. 


Days. 


1 girl, . . 1 


15 


1 girl, . 


11 


1 girl, 






2 


15 


1 girl, 




. 1 


- 


1 girl, 






. 3 


- 


1 girl, 




. 2 


15 


2 girls, 






. 3 


15 


1 girl, 




. 8 


- 


1 girl, 






. 4 


15 


1 girl, 




. 11 


15 


1 girl, 






. 5 


- 


5 girls, on average 4 months, 2i 


days. 


1 girl, 

1 girl, 

2 girls, 






5 

6 
. 6 


15 
15 


Recalled for perjury : — 

1 girl, 2 years, 6 months, U 


> days. 


2 girls, 






. 8 


- 


Recalled for running away : — 




1 girl, 






8 


15 


Mos. 


Days. 


2 girls, 






9 


- 


1 girl, . 


20 


1 girl, 






11 


15 


1 girl, 




. 1 


15 


1 girl, 






12 


15 


1 girl, 




. 2 


- 


1 girl, 






14 


15 


1 girl, 




. 3 


- 


1 girl, 






15 


15 


1 girl, 




. 4 


- 


20 girls, on average 7 months, 


1 day. 


1 girl, 




. 5 


- 






1 girl, 




. 9 


- 






7 girls, on average 3 months, 1£ 


( days. 






Recalled because unsatisfactory : — 






Mos. 


Days. 






1 girl, . . 


5 






1 girl, 




- 


6 


Recalled because in danger 


jf un- 


2 girls, 




• 


15 


chaste conduct : — 




1 girl, 




1 


- 


Mos. 


Days. 


1 girl, 




1 


15 


1 girl, . 


6 


3 girls, 




. 2 


- 


1 girl, 






1 


15 


1 girl, 




. 2 


15 


1 girl, 






2 


- 


2 girls, 




. 3 


- 


2 girls, 






2 


15 


1 girl, 




5 


- 


3 girls, 






3 


- 


2 girls, 




. 5 


15 


1 girl, 






5 


- 


8 -iris, 




. 7 


- 


2 girls, 






5 


15 


2 girls, 




. 8 


- 


2 girls, 






7 


- 


1 gi>l, 




. 9 


15 


2 girls, 






8 


- 


1 girl, 




. 1<» 


- 


2 girls, 






8 


15 


■2 -iris, 




. is 


- 


1 girl, 






9 


- 


1 girl, 




. 17 


- 


1 girl, 






10 


15 


1 girl, 




. 20 


15 


19 girls, on ; 


iverage 1 months, 28 


26 girls, on average 5 months, 27 


days. 




days. 





1 Not including girls returned for change of place, illness, etc. 



104 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



Table VII. 

Showing Number of Relocations l of Girls during the Past Fourteen Months. 



103 were relocated once. 


1 was relocated six times. 


42 were relocated twice. 


1 was relocated seven times. 


29 were relocated three times. 





11 were relocated four times. 


187 2 were relocated 356 times. 



1 Not counting those who went home, or to institutions, hospitals, etc. 

2 Seventy were placed on probation in a family for the first time within the past 
fourteen months. Of 150 girls in places Nov. 30, 1906, 18 had been in same place 
throughout the last fourteen months. 

Table VIII. 

Showing Employment of Girls not placed in Families. 



Assisting mother or relative, 


4 


Factory, netting, 


1 


Assisting mother, who keeps 




oil skin clothing, 


. 1 


lodgers, 


1 


rivet, . 


. 1 


Assisting mother, who takes in 




rubber, 


. 1 


washing, .... 


1 


shirt, . 


1 


Attendant in hospital, 


1 


shoe, . 


6 


Attending school, living at 




valentine, . 


1 


home, 


3 


Housekeeper, . 


2 


Bakery, 


2 


Housework by the day, . 


2 


Book bindery, 


2 


Laundry, .... 


. 2 


Book-keeping in grocery store, 


2 


Mill, paper, . . 


1 


Bundle girl 


2 


textile, 


7 


Business office, . . . . 


3 


Millinery, .... 


3 


Factory, aluminum post card, . 


1 


Nurse in training, . 


1 


candy, .... 


2 


Restaurant, 


3 


cigar, .... 


2 


Saleswoman, 


4 


electric light, 


1 


Not reported, . 


3 


glove, .... 


1 







hose, .... 


1 




70 x 



1 Including those coming of age this year. Four others recently gone home. 

Table IX. 

Showing Cash Account of Girls on Probation. 

Cash received to credit of 200 girls, from Sept. 30, 1905, to Nov. 

30, 1906, $2,722 81 

By deposits in savings bank on account of 200 girls, . . . 2,682 00 

By cash on hand, — fractional parts of a dollar could not be de- 
posited, 40 81 

Cash drawn from savings bank on account of 134 girls, from 

Sept 30, 1905, to Nov. 30, 1906, ...... 2,668 11 

By cash paid, 2,668 11 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



105 



Table X. 

Showing Use of Savings withdrawn during the Past Fourteen Months. 



USE. 



To prepare for wedding or start housekeeping 
Living, car fare, etc., while starting in a trade, 
Expenses for schooling and lessons, . 
Doctors, medicine, glasses, plates, braces, etc., 

Dentists, 

Clothing, 

To help at home, 

Expenses for baby, 

Travelling expenses, including express, . 
To repay for money and articles stolen, . 

Loan, 

Divorce, 

Entire account to girls going to distant home, 
Entire account to girls of age, 1 . 




|497 08 

139 87 

15 90 

190 51 

91 87 

616 59 

24 00 

55 61 

91 30 

9 67 



50 00 

22 68 

52 30 

810 73 



$2,668 11 



1 Three were for girls who were honorably discharged. 

2 One hundred and thirty-four individuals, some drawing for more than one pur- 



Table XL 

Shoiving the Conduct of the 95 Girls who passed out of Custody within 
the Past Fourteen Months) 

Living respectably, 66, or 69 per cent. 

Having behaved badly, 14, or 15 per cent. 

Conduct unknown, 2 10, or 11 per cent. 

Conduct not classified, 3 5, or 5 per cent. 

1 Sixty-eight, or 72 per cent., of these girls had never been returned to the school 
because of unchaste conduct ; 20 had been returned once for unchaste conduct ; 3 
twice, 1 three times. (Counting as returned 1 who was boarded during confine- 
ment, and 3 who were doing badly when they became of age, and who had never 
been returned. Non-classified group excluded.) 

Fifty-four, or 82 per cent., of the 66 girls living respectably when coming of age 
had never been returned to the school for unchaste conduct. 

Of the girls returned for unchaste conduct, 11 Individuals were in their homes, 
or 17 per cent, of all the girls at home; 12 individuals worn in places, or 8 per 
cent, of all tho girls in places. Two Individuals were unchaste in both home and 
place and were counted under both heads. (Based OH proportion <>f all girls under 
age Nov. :'>0, 1906 who were in their homes and likewise of all who were in places.) 

2 Two with friends out of New England ; 2 married ; 8 runaway-.. A t last report 
8 were living respect ably ; 2 were behaving badly. 

3 Not classified because found to be feeble-minded, or very dull, or insane, and 
therefore unfit for the school or for placing. 



106 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. [Dec. 



Table XII. 

Shoiving, in the Light of their Parents' 1 Nativity, the Status at Twenty- 
one of All Girls coming of Age the Past Fourteen Months, excepting the 
Non-classifiable Class? * 





Living 
respectably. 


Conduct 
Bad. 


Conduct 
Unknown. 


Both parents American, .... 


17 


6 


1 


Both parents colored, .... 


1 


- 


1 


Both parents French Canadian, 


6 


- 


5 


Both parents from the Provinces, . 


2 


- 


- 


Both parents English, 




3 2 


1 


- 


Both parents Irish, . 




16 


5 


- 


Both parents Swedish, . 




2 


- 


- 


Both parents German, 




2 


l a 


- 


Both parents Belgian, 




- 


- 


1 


Both parents Russian, 




1 2 


- 


- 


Both parents Italian, 






1 


1 


Both parents Portuguese, 






- 


- 


American and French Canadian, 




- 


- 


American and from the Provinces, 




- 




American and English, . 






- 


- 


American and Irish, 






- 


- 


American and German, . 






- 


- 


French Canadian and Irish, 






- 


- 


French Canadian and Greek, 


• i • 




- 


- 


English and Irish, . 






- 


1 


English and German, 






- 


- 


Scotch and Irish, 






- 


- 


Unknown, 






- 


- 






66 


14 


10 



See foot-note No. 3 to Table XI. 



2 One is a Jew. 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



107 



Table XIII. 

Showing where Married Girls met their Husbands and their Present 

Conduct. 





In theik Places. 


In theik Homes. 




Of Age 

Nov. 30, 

1906. 


Under 

Age 

Nov. 30, 

1906. 


Total 
Number. 


Per- 
centage. 


Of Age 

Nov. 30, 
1906. 


Under 

Age 

Nov 30, 

1906. 


Total 
Number. 


Per- 
centage. 


Living respectably. 
Conduct bad or 

doubtful 
Conduct unknown, 


16 1 ! 18 

2 2 

i i 


34 

4 

2 


.85 
.10 

.05 


10 2 

2 4 
l 1 


23 3 

3 5 

12 6 


33 
5 

13 


.65 

.10 

.25 


Totals, . 


19 21 


40 


- 


13 


38 


51 


- 



Proportion of girls in their places to be married, 
Proportion of girls in their homes to be married, 



15 per cent. 7 
46 per cent. 7 



1 First acquainted : before commitment, 1. 

2 First acquainted: before commitment, 1; after return home, 5; time not 
known, 4. 

3 First acquainted : before commitment, 5, of these, 2 were married before going 
out on probation ; after return home, 15 ; time not known, 3. 

' 4 First acquainted : before commitment, 2 ; after return home, 1. 

5 First acquainted : after return home, 1 ; time not known, 2. 

6 First acquainted : before commitment, 2 ; after return home, 2 ; time not 
known, 8. 

7 Based on girls now married and under age, and proportion in places and at 
home Nov. 30, 1906. 

Table XIV. 

Hospital Treatment was given Girls in the Following Cases : 



Eyes, defect of vision, 1 


41 


Strained back, 1 . 


1 


Eyes, inflamed or with scars, 1 


3 


Curvature of spine, 1 . 


1 


Ear troubles, 2 
Adenoids removed, 1 . 


7 

1 


Appendicitis, 

Hernia, .... 


2 

1 


Throat troubles, 1 


5 


Heart trouble, 1 . 


1 


New palate, 1 

Swollen mouth gland removed, 1 


1 
1 


Rheumatism, 
Bronchitis, 1 


1 
1 


Operations on nose, 2 . 
Flat foot,' .... 


3 

7 


Typhoid fever, 3 . 

Aiuemia, run down condition, 1 


1 
3 


Growth on foot removed, . 


1 


Tuberculosis, 4 . 


6 


Housemaid's knee, 


1 


Gynaecological, 8 . 


11 


Hardness on knee, 1 
Needle in hand, 1 
Broken rib, 


1 
1 
1 


Pregnancy, 

Syphilis, 6 

Convalescing, 


1 

3 

12 


Hip disease, 


1 







Out-patients. 

All out-patients but 1. 

Died. 

Out-patients, 3. 



"' Out-patients, 7. 

r ' Condition previous to original com- 
mitment to the school, 1. 



108 



STATISTICS INDUSTKIAL SCHOOL. [Dec. 







Table XIV. 


— Concluded. 










Hospitals where treated. 




Cambridge Hospital, ... 1 


New England Hospital, 


1 


Carney Hospital, 1 




. 13 


New England Hospital Dispen- 




Cullis Consumptive Home 




. 1 


sary, 8 


6 


Harvard Dental School, 2 




. 1 


State Hospital, . 


5 


Lowell General Hospital, 2 




. 1 


St. Luke's Convalescent Home, 


2 


Massachusetts Charitable Eye 


Vincent Memorial Hospital, 


3 


and Ear Infirmary, 3 . . 56 


Waltham Hospital, . 


1 


Massachusetts General Hospital, 4 28 




— 


Massachusetts State Sanatorium, 3 


Cases treated, 


132 


Milton Convalescent Home, . 10 






1 Nine were out-patients. 


3 Fifty-three were out-patients. 




2 Out-patients. . . 


4 Twenty-one were out-patients. 




Tabli 


s XV. 




Showing the Home City or Town of 126 Girls committed within the Past 


Fourteen Months. 




Boston, 29 


Amesbury, 




Brockton, . - 








2 


Athol, 










Cambridge, 








10 


Attleborough, 










Chelsea, 








1 


Barre, 










Chicopee, . 








1 


Bolton, 










Everett, 








1 


Bridgewater, 










Fall River, 








8 


Brookfield, 










Fitch burg, . 








3 


Hyde Park, 










Lawrence, . 








5 


Lee, . 










Lowell, 








3 


Methuen, . 










Lynn, . 








8 


Milford, . 










Maiden, 








5 


Milton, 










Marlborough, 








3 


Pepperell, . 










New Bedford, 








1 


Provincetown, 










Newton, 








3 


Randolph, . 










North Adams, 








4 


Reading, 










Salem, 








1 


Revere, 










Springfield, 








2 


Royalston, . 










Worcester, 








4 


Southbridge, 
Stoughton, . 










From 19 cities, 






94 


Tewksbury, 
Westfield, . 










Floating, 1 . 






4 


Whitman, . 












Williamstown, 












From 24 towns, 






28 



All for years in the care of the State. 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT No. 18, 



109 



Table XVI. 

Showing Technical Causes of 126 Commitments within the Past 
Fourteen Months. 



Stubbornness, 1 .... 


60 


Common nightwalking, 


3 


Stubborn and disobedient, . 


1 


Drinking, .... 


1 


Stubborn and disobedient and 




Forgery, .... 


1 


larceny, 


1 


Larceny, .... 


29 


Delinquency, .... 


8 


Breaking and entering and lar- 




Wayward child, .... 


2 


ceny, .... 


1 


Lewd, wanton and lascivious, . 


2 


Vagrancy, .... 


1 


Leading idle and vicious life, . 


3 


Runaway, .... 


. 3 


Fornication, . 


1 


Habitual school absentee, . 


1 


Idle and disorderly, . 


8 







1 The charge of stubbornness and delinquency may cover any offence, from the 
least serious to the most serious. The complaint of stubbornness can be made by 
the parent only. 

Table XVII. 

Showing Ages of 126 Girls committed within the Past Fourteen Months. 



10 years, 

11 years, 

12 years, 

13 years, 




14 years, 

15 years, 

16 years, 
19 years, 1 



20 
48 
31 

1 



Average age, 15 years, 5 months, 27 days. 



1 Real age ascertained from birth records in England. 



Table XVIII. 

Showing Nativity of 126 Oirls committed within the Past Fourteen Months. 



Born in Massachusetts, 


83 


Born in Canada, 


. 4 


Born in New Hampshire, . 


5 


Born in the Provinces, 


. 6 


Born in Vermont, 


3 


Born in England, 


. 3 


Born in Rhode Island, 


2 


Born in Ireland, 


1 


Born in Connecticut, . 


2 


Horn in Sweden, 


1 


Born in New York, . 


3 


Born in Italy, 


2 


Born in Pennsylvania, 


1 


Horn in Portugal, 


1 


Born in Illinois, 
Born in Wisconsin, 


1 

1 


Foreign born, 


. 18 


Born in Virginia, 

Born in North Carolina, . 


1 
8 


Birthplace unknown, . 


. 3 


Born in United States, 


105 







110 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. [Dec. 



Table XIX. 

Showing Nativity of Parents of 126 Girls committed within the Past 

Fourteen Months. 



Both parents American, 1 . 
Both parents French Canadian, 
Both parents from the Prov- 
inces, 
Both parents English, 
Both parents Irish, 
Both parents Scotch, 
Both parents Swede, 
Both parents German, 
Both parents Italian, 
Both parents Portuguese, 
Both parents unknown, 



33 
16 



12 

3 
2 
3 
5 
2 
5 



American and French Canadian 
American and from the Prov 

inces, 3 
American and English, 
American and Irish, . 
American and Scotch, 
American and Swedish, 
American and German, 
American and unknown, 
French Canadian and English, 
French Canadian and Irish, 
French Canadian and German, 
French Canadian and Portu 

guese, .... 
From the Provinces and Irish, 
From the Provinces and Portu 

guese, 
English and Irish, 
Scotch and Irish, 
Welsh and Irish, 
Irish and German, 
Irish and Russian, 
Irish and Portuguese, 



, 2 



1 Both parents colored, 8 ; one parent colored, 3. 

2 Both parents Jewish, 2. 

3 One parent colored, 1. 

Table XX. on the following page is usually based on the court record, 
the information gathered in an interview with the girl upon her arrival at 
the school, the record of the associated charities or other charitable agencies, 
and an investigation of the home by the school visitors. This year the 
department has been so short handed that the investigation by the visitors 
has been for the most part omitted, and the information tabulated is in 
so far less thorough. 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



Ill 



Table XX. 

Showing Domestic Conditions of the 126 Girls committed within the Past 

Fourteen Months. 



Both parents at home, 1 


52 


Mother or woman in charge of 




Mother only at home,* 


30 


the home worked out, . 


43 


Father only at home, 3 


18 


No woman in the home, 


3 


Mother and stepfather at home, 


7 






Father and stepmother at home, 


6 


Girl previously worked in mill, 




Both parents dead, 


3 


factory or store, 


53 


One dead, one whereabouts un- 




Worked at housework or caring 




known, 


4 


for children, 7 .... 


26 


Whereabouts of both unknown, 


4 


Worked in boarding house, 




Lived with other relatives, 


10 


hotel or restaurant, 


3 


No home, 4 


3 


Worked for dressmaker, . 


1 






Worked in greenhouses, . 


1 


Temperate fathers or step- 




Helped at home, 


3 


fathers, 


23 


Attended school, 


24 


Intemperate fathers or step- 








fathers, 


62 


Committed as under the average 




Been in penal institutions, 


11 


of intelligence, 8 


16 


Grossly immoral fathers, . 


4 


Ran away from home just pre- 




Fathers guilty of incest, . 


3 


vious to commitment, 9 . 


59 


Brother guilty of incest, . 


1 






Temperate mothers or step- 








mothers, 


62 


Been under the care of the 




Intemperate mothers or step- 




State Board of Charity, . 


22 


mothers, 


17 


Been under the charge of homes 




Been in penal institutions, 5 


6 


or societies, 10 .... 


27 


Grossly immoral mothers, 


18 


Been on probation from the 




Families on associated charities 1 




courts, 


19 


records, 6 


81 


Been in court before, 


8 



1 Adopted, 1. 

2 Separated from husband, 1 ; husband deserted, 11 ; left husband, 1 usband in 
penal institution, 4 ; illegitimate child, 1. 

11 Divorced from wife, 1; separated from wife, 1; wife sent off because unchaste, 
2; wife deserted, 2. 

* Father's whereabouts unknown, mother dead, 1 ; father dead, mother immoral 
woman, 1 ; father drunkard, mother living with another man, 1. 

8 For unchastity, 3. 

Looked up : Boston, 19 ; Cambridge, 7 ; Fall River, 6 ; Fitchburg, 2 ; Lawrence, 3 ; 
Lowell, 3; Lynn, 7; Maiden, 3; Newton, 3; Salem, 1; Springfield, 2; Worcester, 4. 

7 All but 10 in the care of other societies. 

8 Nine of these proved to be of average brightness, but 9 others were found on 
observation at the school to be under the average. 

9 Not including those who stayed out single nights. 

10 Some were successively in charge of different societies, and with the girls 
from the State Board of Charity make 56 cases in 28 different societies. 



112 



STATISTICS INDUSTEIAL SCHOOL. [Dec, 



Table XXL 

Showing Literacy of 126 Girls committed within the Past Fourteen Months. 



In 9th grade, 






8 


Recently left school, . 


38 


In 8th grade, 








16 


Out of school one year, 


24 


In 7th grade, 








22 


Out of school one and one-half 




In 6th grade, 








26 


years, 


11 


In 5th grade, 








23 


Out of school two years, . 


25 


In 4th grade, 








10 


Out of school two and one-half 




In 3d grade, 








8 


years, . 


4 


In 2d grade, 








4 


Out of school three years, . 


14 


In 1st grade, 








3 


Out of school four years, . 


4 


School record not determined, 


6 


Out of school six years, . 


4 




Out of school eight years, . 


2 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



113 



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STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. [Dec 



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A. — Living respectably. 
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ably, 

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1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



115 



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116 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



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1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 



117 



Table XXV. 

Showing, in the Light of their Age at Commitment {being over or under 
Sixteen Years), the Conduct of the Following Girls: Those in the Care 
of the School throughout the Fourteen .Months ending Nov. 30. 1906 ; 
Those coming of Age during the Same Period: excluding in Both Croups 
the Xon- classifiable Class? 




A. — Living bespectably. 
Xo longer in the Care of the State : — 
Attained majority (married), living 

respectably, .... 
Attained majority (unmarried), liv 

ing respectably, 
Died, conduct has been good, . 
Honorably discharged, 



//. In Care of but no longer maintained 

by the State : — 
Married, living respectably, 
Unmarried, with friends, . 
At work in other families, 
At work elsewhere, . 
Attending school or academy, pay 

ing their way, .... 



Total no longer maintained and living 
respectably, 

B. — Conduct Bad ob Doubt/ftx. 
I. Xo longer in the Care of the State : — 
Attained majority (married), in 

prison or elsewhere, 
Attained majority (unmarried), in 
prison or elsewhere, 



//. Still in Care of State, under Twenty, 
one: — 

Married 

On probation withfriendsor atlarge, 
Recalled to school for serious fault 

and remaining, . 
In prison or house of correction, 
Were in prison, now discharged, 
In hospital through their own mis- 
conduct, 

Total, conduct bad or doubtful, 

C —Conduct not known*. 
/. Xo longer in the Care of the State : — 
Married, ...... 

Unmarried, 

//. Still in the Care of the Stat* : — 

Married, 

On probation with friends, out of 

New England, 

At large, having left their homes or 
places 

Total, conduct not known, 

Grand total 



41 

57 
137 

S 



245 
311 



19 



4" 



32 
45 
110 

4 



192 



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54 


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9 


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5 


25 


- 


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432 



■ 



1 See foot-note No. 3 to Table XI. 



118 



STATISTICS INDUSTEIAL SCHOOL. 



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1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



119 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Current Expenses and Salaries. 
1905. — October, received from State Treasurer, 

November, " " " " 

December, " " 

January, " " " " 

February, " 

March, " " " " 

April, 
May, 
June, 
July, 

August, " " " " 

September, " " " " 

October, 

November, " " " " 







$3,194 16 






3,131 10 






3,390 95 






5,756 05 






4,463 18 






4,413 78 






3,401 90 






3,627 54 






5,899 47 






4,414 97 






3,930 71 






3,085 81 






4,225 64 






3,647 48 




$56,582 74 



1906. 



Bills paid 

October, . 

November, 

December, 

January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, . 

November, 



as per Vouchers at State Treasury. 



$3,194 


16 


3,131 


in 


3,390 


9r» 


5,756 05 


4,463 


is 


4,413 78 


3,401 


90 


3,627 


54 


5,899 


47 


4,414 


97 


3,930 


71 


3,085 


81 


4,225 


64 


3,647 


48 


$56,582 74 



120 FINANCIAL STATEM'T INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 





$1,059 01 




682 91 




978 53 




751 58 




1,150 25 




964 10 




777 16 




738 19 




425 02 




1,000 99 




1,102 51 




793 23 




718 63 




2,117 02 




$ 13,259 13 



Current Expenses and Salaries of the Department of Boarding 
Out and Probation. 

1905. — October, received from the State Treasurer, 

November, 
December, 

1906. — January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 



Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury. 

1905. — October, $1,059 01 

November, 682 91 

December, 978 53 

1906. — January, 751 58 

February, 1,150 25 

March, . 964 10 

April, 777 16 

May, 738 19 

June, 425 02 

July, 1,000 99 

August, 1,102 51 

September, 793 23 

October, 718 63 

November, 2,117 02 

$13,259 13 
Expenditures. 

Bills paid as per Vouchers at the State Treasury. 
Appropriation (act of May 18, 1905, chapter 83) for plumbing :— 

1905. — December, . . . ... . . . $3,311 92 

1906. — January, 379 34 

February, 480 25 

March 33 23 

October 540 97 

November, 1,009 51 

$5,755 22 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 121 

Appropriation (act of May 18, 1905, chapter 83) for carpenter work and 
necessary repairs : — 

1905. — October, $89 23 

November, 98 85 

December, 68 39 

$256 47 

Appropriation (act of May 26, 1906, chapter 77) for repairs on Elm 
cottage : — 

1905. — July, $432 19 

August, 622 40 

September, . 235 60 

October, 196 52 

$1,486 71 

Appropriation (act of -May 26, 1906, chapter 77) for furnishing hospital, 
laundry and bakery : — 

1905.- July, $128 21 

August, 539 64 

October, 70 61 

$738 46 

Appropriation (act of May 26, 1906, chapter 77) for a silo, gasoline 
engine and ensilage cutter : — 



1906. — July, $780 00 

August, 366 62 

October 53 38 

$1,200 00 

Appropriation (act of May 26, 1906, chapter 77) for erecting a store- 
house : — 

1906. — October $455 50 

November, 1,324 35 

$1,779 85 



122 FINANCIAL STATEM'T INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec, 









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1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No . 1 8 , 



123 



FAEM ACCOUNT. 



Dr. 
To live stock, as per inventory, 1905, 

tools and carriages, as per inventory, 1905, 
miscellaneous, as per inventory, 1905, . 
produce on hand, as per inventory, 1905, 

fertilizers, 

farming implements, .... 

grain, 

labor, 

live stock, 

services of veterinary, 

plants, seeds and trees, 

harness repairs, 

blacksmithing, 



ice, 



Cr. 



By produce consumed, 

produce sold and amount sent to State Treasurer 

produce on hand, as per inventory, 1906, 

live stock, as per inventory, 1906, 

tools and carriages, as per inventory, 1906, . 

miscellaneous, as per inventory, 1906, . 



Balance for the farm, 



$5,306 80 


3,150 00 


1,817 52 


5,348 


15 


483 


15 


187 


05 


3,360 


09 


4,505 


32 


14 00 


10 


50 


249 


19 


32 70 


388 58 


41 


86 


$24,894 


91 


$10,118 


63 


294 08 


6,011 


35 


• 4,782 


00 


3,225 00 


2,297 


45 


$26,728 51 


$1,833 


60 



124 



PROPERTY INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



VALUATION OF PEOPEETY 



Land and buildings, - . $ 192,540 00 

Personal Property. 

Produce on hand, . ...... f 6,011 35 

Live stock, 4,782 00 

Tools, vehicles and harness, . . . . 3,225 00 

House furnishings and supplies, . . . 26,156 25 

Miscellaneous, 2,297 45 

— $42,472 05 

WILLIAM L. BANCROFT, 
ANDREW J. BANCROFT, 

Appraisers. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
Worcester, ss. Nov. 14, 1906. 

Personally appeared the above-named William L. Bancroft and Andrew J. 
Bancroft, and made oath to the foregoing statements. 

Before me, GEORGE E. HOWE, 

Justice of the Peace. 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



125 



LIST OF SALARIED OFFICERS NOW 
EMPLOYED. 



F. F. Morse, superintendent, 

G. L. Smith, assistant superintendent, 
C. C. Beckley, special physician 

C. P. Fitzgerald, physician, 
E. T. Fox, dentist, 

D. F. O'Connor, oculist, 

B. V. Smith, steward, . 
N. R. Maxwell, matron, Bolton, 

C. M. Church, matron, hospital, 
A. M. T. Eno, matron, . 
M. E. Mitchell, matron, 

C. C. Russell, matron, . 
K. E. Page, matron, 

E. A. Morrison, matron, 
J. 1). Hodder, matron, . 

D. A. Johnson, matron, 
H. B. Shaw, supervisor of schools, 
D M. Carl en, teacher of sloyd, . 
M. E. Richmond, teacher of music, 
C. M. Campbell, gymnastic teacher, 

E. R Bannister, teacher, 
L. A. Strout, teacher, . 
V. Rollins, teacher, 
A. L. Mead, teacher, 
E L. Gammon, teacher, 
G. L. Webb, teacher, . 
A. G. Desmond, teacher, 
V. O. Wilder, teacher, Bolton, 
M. ('. (Mark, supply officer, 
M. Kimball, supply officer, . 

F. K. Dudley, laundry matron, 
I. Walker, bread matron, 
L. V. Prescott, clerk, . 
C. E. Stevens, gardener, 
A. Crocker, housekeeper, . 
L. Eastman, housekeeper, Bolton, 
J. B. Higgins. housekeeper, 
F. E. Young, housekeeper, . 



126 OFFICERS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. [Dec. 

E. C. Missler, housekeeper, f 350 

S. A. King, housekeeper, 400 

F. N. Land, housekeeper, 350 

I. N. Bailey, housekeeper, . 300 

N. C Rudd, housekeeper, 300 

L. M. Carter, housekeeper, 400 

B. G. Foss, housekeeper, 400 

W. B. Eastman, foreman, 540 

H. B. Eastman, foreman, Bolton, 540 

D. H. Bailey, carpenter, 540 

H. R. Wright, dairyman, 384 

A. R. Harrington, teamster, . . . . . . . . 360 

A. L. Harrington, teamster, . . . . . . . 360 

H Harrington, laborer, 312 

W. S. MacMakin, laborer, 312 

C. C. Mead, driver, . . 420 

Department of Boarding Out and Probation. 1 

Mary W. Dewson, superintendent, . $1,500 

Lucy W. Stebbins, visitor, 1,000 

Chloe Curtis, visitor, . 700 

Jane McC. Bacot, visitor, . . . 600 

Sarah W. Carpenter, visitor, ........ 600 

M. Glynn, clerk and stenographer, 700 



Advisory Physicians, unpaid. 
Dr. Orville F. Rogers. Dr. Richard C. Cabot. Dr. James S. Stone. 

1 Three vacancies. See superintendent's report, pages 96 and 97. 



1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



127 



VOLUNTEER VISITORS. 



Putnam, Elizabeth C, 
Andrews, Mrs. Charles A., 
Bigelow, Mrs. Henry B., 
Brewer, Mrs. Frank C, 
Burt, Miss Grace M., . 
Childs, Miss Helen S., . 
Coburn, Miss Helen M., 
Cowles, Mrs William N., 
Donnelly, Mrs. J. B., . 
Edgett, Miss Ruth F., . 
Field, Miss Caroline B., 
French, Mrs. E. V., 
Fuller, Mrs. Frederick T., 
Gage, Miss Sybil, 
Hall, Miss Emma II., . 
Harlow, Miss Margaret, 
Hurd, Mrs. Albert G., . 
Leonard, Miss Lizzie C, 
BicGuigan, Miss Mary A., 
Moore, Mrs. A. G., 
Morse, Mrs. S. I., . 
Mossey, Mrs. C. E., 
Mulcahy, Mrs. John, . 
Richardson, Miss Louisa I 
Rockwell, Miss Florence, 
San ford, Mi>s Martha L. 
Sheffield, Mrs. Alfred I)., 
Strong, Miss Maud E., 
Sullivan, Mi88 May F., 

Warner, Mrs. ( Iharlea II., 
Wigglesworth, Miss Marion E., 
Woodbury, Miss Alice P., . 



At large. 

Hoi yoke. 

Cambridge. 

Hingham. 

Newton. 

Deerfield. 

Lowell. 

Ayer. 

Gardner. 

Beverly. 

Weston. 

Lynn. 

Milton. 

Cambridge. 

New Bedford. 

Worcester. 

Mill bury. 

Bridge water. 

Dan vers. 

Watertown. 

Sandwich. 

Roxbury. 

Brookfield. 

Chestnut Hill 

Montague. 

Worcester. 

Springfield. 

Northampton. 

Chicopee. 

Fall River. 

Milton. 

Gloncester. 



128 STATISTICAL FOKM INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 



STATISTICAL FORM FOR STATE 
INSTITUTIONS. 



[Prepared in accordance with a resolution of the National Conference of Charities and Cor- 
rection, adopted May 15, 1906.] 



Name of institution : State Industrial School for Girls. 

Population. 





Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Number of inmates present at beginning of 

fiscal year. 
Number received during the year, . 


- 


209 

5 113 1 

) 126 2 


209 

113 l 
126 2 


Number discharged or died during the year, . 


- 


95 2 


95* 


Number at end of the fiscal year, 


- 


221 


221 


Daily average attendance (i.e., number of in- 
mates actually present) during the year. 

Average number of officers and employees 
during the year. 


12 


214 

48 


214 

60 



Number in care of probation department, .... 417 
Number coming of age within the fourteen months, and so 

passing out of charge, 95 

Employees of probation department, 8 

Expenditures. 
Current expenses : — 

1. Salaries and wages, . . ..." . $25,319 00 2 

2. Clothing, 6,197 77 s 

3. Subsistence, 7,766 66 2 

4. Ordinary repairs, . . . . . 3,338 06 2 

5. Office, domestic and out-dbor expenses, . 13,931 25 2 

Total, $56,582 74 

Amount carried forward, $56,582 74 

1 Twelve months. 2 Fourteen months. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 129 

Amount brought forward, $56,582 74 

Extraordinary expenses : — 

1 New buildings, land, etc., . . . $2,979 85 

2. Permanent improvements to existing 

buildings, 8,236 86 

Total, 11,216 71 

Grand total, $67,799 45 

Probation Department. 

Salaries of visitors, $6,084 55 

Visitors' travelling and office expenses, 5,064 26 

Travelling and hospital expenses, board, etc., for girls, . . 2,110 32 

|13,259 13 
Notes on current expenses : — 

1. Salaries and wages should include salaries of trustees or directors, 

if any. 

2. Clothing includes shoes, and also materials for clothing and shoes if 

they are manufactured in the institution. 

4. Ordinary repairs include all of those which simply maintain the 

buildings in condition without adding to them. Any repairs which 
are of the nature of additions should be classed with " permanent 
improvements." 

5. This item includes everything not otherwise provided for, e.g., furni- 

ture, bedding, laundry supplies, medicines, engineer's supplies, 
postage, freight, library, etc. 

Executive head (superintendent of school) : Fannie F. Morse. 
Superintendent of probationers : Mary W. Dewson. 



Public Document No. 18 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OP 



THE TRUSTEES 



<v. - 



Lyman and Industrial 
Schools 



(Formerly known as Trustees of the State Primary and 
Reform Schools), 



Year ending November 30, 1907. 



k 



% 



mm 1 • 



BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1908. 



Approved by 
The State Boafd ok Publtoation. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Trustees' Report ox Lyman School, 6 

Trustees' Report on State Industrial School, 16 

Appendix A, Report of Treasurer and Receiver-General on Trust 

Funds, 27 

Appendix B, Report of Officers of the Lyman School: — 

Report of Superintendent 39 

Report of Superintendent of Lyman School Probationers, .... 45 

Report of Physician, 58 

Statistics concerning Boys, 60 

Financial Statement, 70 

Farm Account, 74 

Valuation of Property, 75 

List of Salaried Officers, 77 

Statistical Form for State Institutions, 79 

AFPBNDI3 C, Report of Officers of the State Industrial School: — 

Report of Superintendent, 83 

Report of Superintendent of Industrial School Probationers, ... 91 

Report of Physician, 98 

Statistics concerning Girls 99 

Financial Statement, 120 

Farm Account, 124 

Valuation of Property, 125 

List of Salaried Officers 126 

List of Volunteer Visitors, 12S 

Statistical Form for State Institutions, 130 



Commflnforaltjj of llfassacjfnsttis. 



Lyman and Industkial Schools. 



TRUSTEES. 
M. H. WALKER, Westborough, Chairman. 
ELIZABETH G. EVANS, Boston, Secretary. 
SUSAN C. LYMAN, Waltham. 
JAMES W. McDONALD, Marlborough. 
GEORGE H. CARLETON, Haverhill. 
MATTHEW B. LAMB, Worcester. 
CARL DREYFUS, Boston. 

HEADS OP DEPARTMENTS. 

ELMER L. COFFEEN, Superintendent of Lyman School. 

THOMAS H. AYER, Visiting Physician of Lyman School. 

WALTER A. WHEELER, Superintendent of Lyman School Probationers. 

FANNIE F. MORSE, Superintendent of State Industrial School. 

C C. BECKLEY, Visiting Physician of State Industrial School. 

MARY W. DEWSON, Superintendent of Industrial School Probationers 



Commontomltl] of lltassarjwsttis. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To Eis Excellency the Governor and the Eonorable Council. 

The trustee? ot the Lyman and Industrial Schools respectfully 
present the following report for the year ending Nov. 30, 
1907, for the two reform schools under their control. 

M. H. WALKER. 
ELIZABETH G. EVANS. 
SUSAN C. LYMAN. 

james w, Mcdonald. 

GEORGE H. CARLETOX. 
MATTHEW B. LAMB. 
CARL DREYFUS. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS AT WESTBOROUGH. 

The Lyman School is a State institution for the care and 
education of boys who, being under the age of fifteen, are 
committed by the courts for minor offences. Many of the 
boys are committed upon the request of their parents ; but the 
real offences of these so-called ' ' stubborn children " are usually 
found, upon investigation, to be of much the same character 
as those convicted upon complaint of the police for serious 
breaches of the law. The same is true of boys committed 
under chapter 314 of the Acts of 1906 as delinquent children. 
In every case the term of commitment is for minority, — the 
duty being thus laid upon the school and its probation depart- 
ment, not merely to restrain or instruct a group of troublesome 
boys for a prescribed season, but also to follow them when 
they go back to the world, and to see that they are given a 
chance for a fresh start in life. 

The institution at Westborough with 160 acres of land has 
accommodations for some 300 boys, distributed in ten cottage 
groups; and there is a primary department at Berlin, seven 
miles distant, where a small number of the younger boys are 
cared for. At Westborough the term of detention depends 
upon a marking system, intended to hold a boy for from a 
year to eighteen months, and longer when they prove recal- 
citrant. The educational methods in use are well up to modern 
requirements, drawing, music, manual training both in sloyd 
and in more advanced courses in wood and in iron being 
emphasized in the curriculum. The report of the superintendent 
upon page 39 describes the methods of the school in detail, 
the various ways in which the boys are employed out of school 
hours and the general mechanism of the institution. 

In the Berlin branch the methods are comparatively in- 
formal, as is possible when but a handful of children are 
grouped together, and the training is expected to be soon 
supplemented by boarding out in some country family, — the 
theory that a judicious home training in many cases is all that 
is needed for lads of from nine to thirteen being amply borne 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 7 

out by experience. Boys who are not amenable to these mild 
methods of control, or who, having been returned to their own 
people, have reverted to lawlessness, are recalled to the main 
branch of the institution at Westborough for a longer term 
under its more systematic training. About half of the Berlin 
boys are successfully reinstated in the community, having had 
an average of but four or five months of institution life, and 
wholly escaping the undesirable acquaintance which is an in- 
evitable incident of membership in a large reform school. 

The term of detention at Berlin being so short, an old- 
fashioned farmhouse, affording accommodation for but 22 boys, 
has sufficed to care for 55 of the 207 boys committed within 
the past year. Had all these been retained in the institution 
as long as is customary at Westborough, or until there was 
a reasonable chance that they would behave themselves with 
their own people, the State would have been forced to sink 
many thousands of dollars in additional accommodations and 
to spend many other thousands of dollars in maintenance. 
The Berlin cottage, which was opened just twelve years ago, 
has up to date received 520 different children. Its primary 
cost was only $8,500, including the house, the furnishings and 
100 acres of land ; while a boarded boy costs only $2 a week 
(this covers his clothing), with a trifle in addition for visiting, 
against an average cost of $5.19 for maintenance in the 
institution. 

When a boy leaves the school, whether after a few weeks' 
detention at Berlin, as sometimes happens, or after the year 
or more at Westborough, he passes into the care of the pro- 
bation department. The Berlin boys, who are always under 
thirteen, take eagerly to life in the country, the animals and 
all the processes of the farm being full of interest to the m ; 
but boys over fifteen — and few leave Westborough when they 
are younger — have reached a period of life when the social 
instincts are becoming imperative, and cases arise in which it 
is often necessary to strain a point in the effort to balance a 
boy's taste against his opportunities. The fact that farm work 
is the only occupation nowadays in which a home goes with the 
job often causes the trustees to be confronted with the per- 
plexing alternative of placing a boy under conditions against 



8 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

which he is certain to rebel, or returning him to conditions in 
his own home which afford little encouragement to welldoing:. 
Thus it happens that where practically every Berlin boy goes 
out first to a farmer, and invariably considers this a privi- 
lege and a delight, only 78 of the Westborough boys have 
gone out to farm places this year, against 152 to their own 
homes. 

The tables on page 61 show, of the boys under the care of 
the visiting department 1 480 in their own homes, 97 placed 
with farmers or others, 58 at board, and 95 for themselves, 
as the phrase goes, meaning by this term boys at work in the 
cities who are not living with relatives or who hire themselves 
out as farm hands. The amount of $2,645.37 was collected 
within the year in behalf of 62 boys, mostly under eighteen 
years of age, at work for farmers, and was placed in the sav- 
ings bank for their benefit. 

The years of probation are the critical ones in the formation 
of character. Training in an institution is at best preparatory. 
It is life in the world with its temptations and struggles, which 
is the real thing, the arena in which success or failure is 
demonstrated. A comparative table, recording the conduct of 
all who have come of age during recent years, shows : — 

i This statement is exclusive of 45 boys in the United States army and navy, 48 who have 
left the State, 93 in the Massachusetts Reformatory or other penal institution, 32 who have 
been lost track of, 37 runaways from the school who are either known to be in some other 
institution or in the navy, or who have never been located, included in Table No. 3 on page 61, 
giving the status of all boys under twenty-one whose names are on the books of the 
Lyman School Dec. 1, 1907. 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



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10 TEUSTEES- EEPOET LYMAN SCHOOL.. 

_ 

The year 1893 is ehoser. is starting point in this table 
because this was the first year such figures were compiled. It 
wn - :he poor showing of 1893 which led to the initiation of 
the visiting department, and to the immediate improvement in 
results above indicated. 

It is of interest : find that, of the IS ays — ho came of 
age within the year. 118, or 78 per cent., had never been 
i el arned I rhe school for any misconduct. Whoever may be 
interested in further details of this department will find profit- 
able reading in Mr. Wheelers report, on page 15. 

It will be noted upon pagr 48 : Mr. ^Wheelers report that 
the boys on probation are visited on the average only two and 
one-half times a year, whereas an examination of the probation 
report for the Industrial School girls (page _ shows a vastly 
closer method of supervision for them. The differences : 
m t:_: 1 thus 5ren to obtain between the care of the boys and 

sirls are due to no mere accident, but arise from a reeoarnition 

_ _ 

that there is ■:■. fundamental difference between them. — that 
boys can properly be allowed to run certain risks, -i.d must 
be allowed a large measure of independence, where civilized 
society has agreed that young girls must be protected. A 
further difference between our boys and girls arises from the 
fact thai, whereas :he latter are usually committed to the care 
:f the State : save them from sins against their own natures, 
boys in ni^T cases rat often are committed for offence 
property, and as a result of the law_r~~:: ess which is a nit: 
incident of young adolescence in the masculine creature. — 
which, moreover, easily gives place to a law-abidi^i d spirit 
boy gets old enough to come under the discipline of wage 
earning, during the years wherein he grows from a hee 
child into a man. with the responsibilities of self-support 
upon him. Again, a still further difference between our boys 
and our girls arises from the fact that a far larger number 
among the former come of perfectly respectable parents who, 
had their means been ampler, would have sent their obstrep- 
erous boys to boarding school ; whereas among the girl- 
find a very mu:_ larger proportion of their people who are 
pated or criminal, the small number of girls who come 
of decent people being, more often, individually degenerate. 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 11 

These differences between the boys and the girls make a com- 
parison of methods employed for their reformation unprofit- 
able, except as it may lead to a clearer understanding of the 
lines which each undertaking should pursue. 

Because a concrete illustration often describes a general 
method more graphically than any abstract statement can, 
extracts are here presented from certain selected letters which 
suggest different ways of dealing, during the probationary 
term, with certain typical Lyman School cases. 

G. L., aged eleven, and belonging to respectable people, 
was sent to Berlin ten years ago, having been previously at a 
truant school, and after that involved in a number of breaks, 
stealing a horse, etc. After eight months in the school he was 
placed at board, and in another eight months he was allowed 
to go back to his own people, who had moved into a new 
locality, in the country. Three years ago his visitor reported 
him asa " fine fellow, industrious and worthy, working as a 
brakeman on the Maine Central." He is now twenty years 
old, and not one bad report has he had since he left Berlin. 
Under date of Oct. 21, 1907, he writes to Mr. Wheeler : — 

Your kind letter of the 12th inst. at hand. I was, of course some- 
what surprised, — yet pleased to hear from you and to know you 
still thought of me, occasionally. I am married and we are keeping 
a first-class lodging house and would be pleased if you should ever 
visit our city, to call on us. We have a very nice home seventeen 
rooms, gas throughout, bath, and telephone connections. I have told 
my wife all about you and how kind you were to us all, and she joins 
me in extending you an invitation to visit us at your convenience. 

Another Berlin boy, J. O'l)., after a few months at board, 
was allowed to go home, bis parents having Likewise moved, 
though only from the North End to South Boston. But J. soon 
got into trouble, was arrested and recommitted to the Lyman 
School. Here be received a training of fifteen months, and 
was then sent out (o a farm. lie did well here and was presently 
allowed another trial with his people. This was in L903. Under 
date of Oct. 15, 1907, he writes: — 

I thank you very kindly for the letter you scut me, and the interest 
you take in writeing to me. I am working for the Co. and have 



12 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

a good steady job. and I intend to learn the trade. I am making 12 
dollars a week, and I am saving my money. I have a hundred and 
twenty-five dollars in the South Boston Savings Bank. I have some 
money in the school Bank that I made when I worked on the farm, 
and I was told that I could get it when I was 21 years old. One of 
the vistors from the school came to see me last Saturday. I think 
the School does a lot of good to some boys. I was a wild boy before 
I went to the School, and the people who knew me before I went away 
think I am a find fellow now and I am trying to be. 

W. M. came of miserable people. — his parents frequently 
drunk, etc. W. served a term in truant school, was later 
arrested and taken in charge by a private charitable society, 
only to steal and run away from his place and thus come to the 
Lyman School. A year ago last September he was received 
back by the same farmer whose kindness had before been so ill 
rewarded : and upon October 15 "W. writes : — 

I am getting along alright. I like my work. I am most interested in 
the live stock on the farm. When I came here I could hardly harness a 
horse now the man I am with lets me take a nice pair of horses and go on 
long roads with them, he owns a nice four year old colt he lets me 
drive sometimes. He owns a motor boat, and he owns part of a cot- 
tage at the foot of the lake where they have corn roasts aud lobster 
suppers. He and another man own a gasolene engine with which 
they thrash, saw wood, and cut ensilage. I think after mytime is out 
with this man I will be a farm hand. 

C. G. was a member of a hard gang and long a torment to the 
police. Soon after coming to the Lyman School he ran away, 
but was returned the next day. After sixteen months in the 
school he was sent home on trial ; but a year and a half later he 
was returned to the school, having been idle and dissipated, and 
he was seriously considered for transfer to Concord. However, 
he was earnest in his promises of reformation, and after six 
months in the school he was placed with a farmer, who re- 
ported him the best boy he had ever had. Presently he was 
allowed to make another trial at home, and so far, happily, all 
goes well. L~pon Oct. 14, 1907, he wrote: — 

Dear Friend : I just recieved your letter asking me how I was 
getting along. I am just fine, I am in the best of health and am 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 13 

working at shoe cutting which I like very much and which I hope to 
continue. I have worked at it now for about eight months. It is very 
easy work and the best of the shoe business. It is a good paying job 
when there is work but the work around here is very dull just now as 
it always is in the fall of the year. I have been trying to visit Lyman 
School but have been putting off. I mean to soon though. I hope 
all the boys are well at the school. I never was better in my life. 
And in closing Mr. Wheeler I can honestly say that I am glad I went 
to Lyman School because it learnt me a lesson. If I had never went 
there I might have been as bad as before I was there. Thanking 
you in advance and the teachers that took an interest in me for my 
own welfare I close hoping to see you all soon. 

The last case which we can find space to quote here is that 
of L. B., a thieving, unruly boy and called ;i a terror." 
Trained both at Berlin and at YTestborough, with an unsuc- 
cessful trial in between with his own people, who are respect- 
able, a runaway from TTestborough and kept there for an 
unusually long term, he was probated to his parents for the 
second time in June, 1904. Upon Oct. 14, 1907, he writes : — 

Yes, I am twenty-one years of age. It would be very hard for me 
to believe any one, if I did not know my age. and he were to say you 
are twenty-one. As I stop to think, and look back at all I have 
gone through it seems as though I was thirty. You want to know 
if I have the same position I had a year ago. Yes, I work in the 
same place but at a different employment. "Went to work there 19 
months ago as timekeeper, after working a year at this work I was 
advanced and as I am always anxious to learn something new I 
secured a position as bookbinder in the same place, I am getting 
along tine, and if I succeed there I think that will be my future work 
as it is very profitable. If 1 have not thanked you or other trustees 
of the Lyman School, I think that Mr. Chapin and masters whom I 
was under in my time can say a few words of my endless praise of the 
good that the school has done for me and without a doubt I think that if 
I was not stopped at that place I might today be a convict. I was not 
A-l in the school at any time until the last six months of my career 
there. But that gradual patience which every one had with me won 
out. and at last I got in the right path thank God I am in the right 
path. I will not forget the people of the school even if I am twenty- 
one and I hope I will hear from you again. 



14 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

So much for a few of the acknowledgments from the boys, 
which could be many times multiplied, — remembering always, 
however, that were the whole story told the careers of many 
others would have to be related whom the school has not suc- 
ceeded in reclaiming. But an extract from just one other letter, 
this time from a parent, must be given, as follows : — 

to the Superintendent trustees teachers Masters and all those who 
have had any part in the training of my son. dear sirs i want to 
extend to you one and all my heartfelt thanks for the gentlemanly 
manner in which he was used by you all whilst he was at the lyman 
school he came back home to me a well trained little gentleman and 
everything i can do for him will be done to keep him as such. 

The present superintendent, Mr. Elmer L. Coffeen, who 
took office last January, seems to have gotten his new duties 
well in hand, and the trustees are expecting excellent things 
from his administration. 

The new cottage, built from an appropriation of $22,000 
granted in 1906, was completed over a year ago, but has stood 
vacant, last year's Legislature having failed to appropriate 
money for the furnishings. The special appropriations last 
year were $4,125 to further extend the subway and vacuum- 
heating system, and $2,500 for a steam pump, a water tank 
and pipes, to provide protection from fire. These improve- 
ments are in process of construction, and are of value to the 
school over and above their obvious uses by the work which 
they furnish to the boys. Upon pages 41 and 42 of the super- 
intendent's report will be found full information upon these 
matters. 

The new appropriations which will be asked for are : — 

Horse and carriage barn, to replace the one destroyed by fire, as a 

result of a stroke of lightning on September 28, . . . . $7,000 

To purchase or build a house for the occupancy of the superin- 
tendent, 4,500 

For the purchase from Mr. Hero of between 10 and 11 acres, im- 
mediately adjoining the school premises, ..... 2,750 

Constructing additional subway, and extending the vacuum-heating 

system to Maple cottage, greenhouse and hospital, . . . 2,700 

For furnishing and equipping Elm cottage, . . . . 2,400 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 15 

The Lyman School opened the year with 345 inmates, and 
closed with 342. The whole number of individuals in the 
school during the year was 627, and the average number was 
329. 

The appropriations for the past year were : for salaries, 
$35,466; for current expenses, $55,000; a total of $90,466* 
for running the institution ; to be expended in behalf of pro- 
bationers : for tuition fees to towns, $850 ; for visitation, 
$9,300; for boarding, $5,500. The per capita cost of the 
institution was $5.29, and $1,663.42 was turned into the 
State treasury, making a net per capita of $5.19. 2 The per 
capita cost of Berlin was $2.99 ; the per capita cost of visita- 
tion was 18.9 cents per week, and of the whole body of boys 
in the school, approximately $1.40 per week. 

i In addition to expending the appropriation there was a deficit of $2,041.44. 

a The per capita of $5.19 is the highest incivrred, and is due largely to the prevailing high 
prices. The per capita of 18.1 cent* covers cost of salaries, traveling of officers and hoys 
and office expenses of visiting department, hut is exclusive of the $5,500 spent on hoard 
and the $S50 spent on tuition of placed-out hoys. 



16 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 



STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS AT 
LANCASTER. 

The State Industrial School for Girls comprises two essential 
parts, the institution at Lancaster and the probation depart- 
ment, the headquarters of which are in Boston. These two 
departments are entirely separate in their direct management, 
although one in their aim to give the girls the best possible 
care. The institution has the advantage of taking the girl 
first and giving her a start, and in having the direction of the 
girl and everj^thing pertaining to her in its complete control ; 
the probation department has the advantage in point of time. 
Of the 114 girls who came of age this year the average time 
spent in the institution was two years, and the average time in 
the care of the probation department was four years lacking 
seven days. The officers of the school, living with the girls 
day after day, are thrown into intimate relations with them, 
but under the restricted conditions of the institution ; the 
visitors of the probation department have an opportunity to 
see them as they respond to the varied conditions of life. Our 
aim is to make these two departments as efficient as possible 
in their helpfulness to the girls. To this end the inside and 
outside departments must come into close relations with each 
other in their great common bond, the imperative need of the 
girls. 

Given this brief statement, what does the State actually do 
with those intrusted to it? The girls are committed to the 
Industrial School by the court either as delinquent children 
or for some offence against the law. The State has absolute 
control over them until they are twenty-one years of age, 
when all official authority ceases, and nothing but friendship 
remains. 

The girls come to us having had little or no opportunity in 
life, and by opportunity we mean an early start in a home 
where they are loved and taught the difference between right 
and wrong. Having gone without the love and guidance which 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 17 

are every child's birthright, it is for the State to make up to 
them what they have lost. They come with natures hardened 
and dulled by neglect, which for want of normal outlet have 
drifted into the allurements of false and evil pleasures which 
require nothing of them but acquiescence and irresponsibility. 
Theirs is a long story of wilfulness, misdirected affections and 
deception. The State must not only awaken new possibilities 
in their lives, but must deal positively with the habits formed 
by unconscious drifting and wrong living. With homes that 
have failed to do their part, and with misdirected natures which 
have sought congenial company, a complete change of place 
and surroundings is necessary. This is the first step toward 
giving them an opportunity for better things. In exchange 
for the ever new and diverting life in the present, where these 
neglected girls neither look forward nor backward, our school 
at Lancaster offers a life where the officers meet each girl with 
kindly individual interest ; here variety comes from well-earned 
promotion and work well done, and happiness from self-control 
and kindness toward the other girls. 

The day is divided into reasonable hours of work, play, eat- 
ing and sleeping. In carrying out this life the State has chosen 
a natural park of rolling upland in one of our Xew England 
towns. The country stretches out over fields and pine-covered 
hills to AVachusett ; thus the girls have all the inspiration that 
the peace and beauty of nature can give. Second to the situa- 
tion in wise selection is the arrangement of the seven cottages, 
containing 30 girls each, which are scattered about on the 
grounds. The girls in the cottages are classified according to 
their experience of evil, thus in a measure preventing those who 
are more innocent from making the acquaintance of those who 
have only known the darker side of life. One cottage is set apart 
for the backward and feeble-minded girls. Of the 17 girls sent 
this year to the School for the Feeble-minded, 9 were sent 
directly from the school and 9 were sent after having been first 
tried outside. In 1903 there were 4 of our girls in the School 
for the Feeble-minded ; in 1904, 3 ; in 11)05, 11 ; in 1906, 12 ; 
and in 1907, 28. This increase in number of girls transferred 
has gone far to reduce the accumulation of feeble-minded girls 
in our school. These girls are much better oil' in the School 



18 TEUSTEES' EEPOET INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

for the Feeble-minded, which devotes itself exclusively to girls 
of this class. We must always have a cottage where we can 
observe the girls long enough to decide where they really 
belong ; 5 of the girls sent out this year had been four or ^ve 
years in our institution, which is a long time. 

The industrial training is homely and simple. In each cot- 
tage the girls are taught the household arts of cleaning, cook- 
ing, sewing, washing and ironing. School is carried on in the 
cottages, in ungraded groups, for two and one-half hours every 
afternoon. Here the girls are taught singing and drawing as 
well as the other elementary subjects. In these classes there 
are girls who when they first came to us could neither read, 
write nor tell time, as well as those who have been in the 
seventh and eighth grades. Educationally this is a very un- 
satisfactory condition of things. During the past year we 
have had a teacher who has taken 20 of the most advanced girls 
from the different cottages and given them special work, which 
has proved a good thing as far as it goes. Work in sloyd, 
bread making and the laundry are taught by special teachers 
outside the cottages. These outside lessons in their standard 
of perfection have been found to be an inspiriting influence 
on the girls' daily lives. Expert bread making and laundry 
work come at the end of the industrial training, and are looked 
forward to as being the final preparation for going out. 

Although while in the institution each day must be made an 
end in itself to the girl, and each one must put her whole mind 
on her work, the officers must realize that the high standard of 
the institution is for the benefit of the girl at all times. The 
institution is an incident of essential importance in the girl's 
life. Here she has an opportunity to form good habits, for 
reasons that she herself has learned to understand. If in addi- 
tion to this, through the personal influence of the superintend- 
ent and the officers, the vital life of the girl can be reached, 
so that she goes out from the institution with new possibilities 
in herself which she actually feels, the institution has done 
great things for her, and returns her to her place as a member 
of the community, an apt creature for the next stage in her 
life. Affection, work, rest and regularity have developed new 
possibilities. Daily work well done and kindliness have given 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 19 

her a new conception of life. The peaceful social life which 
she learns to know can be only reached by each one taking her 
part. The backbone of the institution is a life so arranged that 
cause and effect can be easily seen by the girls. It is an ex- 
ceedingly limited life, but herein lies its virtue. The greater 
lessons and opportunities of life must be left until later, when 
they leave the school and return to their rightful heritage in 
the world. With this start they must again contend with the 
trying conditions of life, its irregularities, imperfections and 
exactions. 

It has proved to be of great benefit to the girls to go every 
Sunday to the churches in the town of Lancaster, thus for a 
short time letting them feel themselves a part of the outside 
world. In their recreation hours they get a little coasting 
and skating in winter, and in summer play tennis and base- 
ball, and take walks. In their baseball a training is reached 
which is got in no other way, for here one sees a girl, whose 
desires and emotions have been wrongly directed, gratifying 
the same emotional nature and desires in the heat and intensity 
of the game. The whole girl is alive in a legitimate and whole- 
some way. In this game, through the team play, she is a 
necessary part of the whole, succeeding only through great 
skill, and subject to the rules of the game. 

If for a part of each day something could be offered that 
took the whole girl, the rush and uncontrollableness of the 
unused feelings and powers would not come to the surface 
in such an unmanageable way when she goes out into the 
world. We believe the State could wisely provide a gym- 
nasium, which would offer basket ball and other iraines in win- 
ter. Full outlet of the feelings of the body and the mind 
would not only greatly lessen typical institution trials, such 
a- irritation and bad temper, hut, even for the roughest girls, 
would give wholesome activity to the misdirected feelings that 
must he dealt with in a positive way to bring about a balanced, 
self-controlled character. 

The returned girls who nave seriously failed are sent to our 
cottage in Bolton, a mile and a half away from the school, so 
that they may not bring back to the other girls their evil report 
of the world. The difficulty here i> that the life is about the 



20 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

same as on the grounds at Lancaster only it is much more 
limited and isolated. No outside lessons are given. They 
do not go to the churches in the town. The only new 
way of arousing the girls' interest is an opportunity, given to 
those with special aptitude for it, in a more advanced course 
in dressmaking. The trustees are always on the lookout for 
an entirely new and more complicated plan of life for these 
girls, who have already had the institution training, and who 
have been tried in the world and failed. Their attention, 
minds and hearts should be roused through new avenues. A 
new angle of sight is the end to be aimed at. One more 
attempt to vitalize the normal creature might be made. 

When the industrial course is finished, and each girl has 
made a reasonable improvement, according to her capacity, — 
a period which with the average girl covers a year and a half 
to two years, — the superintendent sends her name to the pro- 
bation department as a candidate for placing out. Before 
leaving the school we want to bear testimony to the devoted 
care of the house officers, whose patience has ever borne with 
the shortcomings of the girls, and who send them out into the 
world with loving and fearful anticipation as to their welfare. 

And now what is the work of the probation department, and 
what does the State try to do for the girls when they come 
back into the world, with all its possibilities, temptations and 
imperfect variable conditions? The State provides a proba- 
tion department, with a superintendent, seven paid visitors 
and one clerk. The office of the probation department is in 
Boston (at 198 Dartmouth Street), our largest city and rail- 
road center, and consequently the most accessible, on the 
whole, as a starting place and meeting place for the visitors, the 
girls, their relations and the employers. The conception of the 
duty of the visitors toward their girls is that each one shall be 
wholly responsible for her wards, wherever they may be. 

One of the first requisites for the visitor who receives the 
girl out of seclusion into her care is that she should know the 
world ; that she should actually be part of it in the happiest, 
fullest way possible. She must have made her own way in it, 
courageously ; she must have a sense of what constitutes the 
real opportunities and happiness of life. She must have 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 21 

imagination enough to grasp the uncontrolled desires of her 
ward and deal with them understandingly. Our office force 
has been made up of young women ; some of them college 
graduates ; all of them with the larger opportunities of life 
before them. Given their rich life in the world, it is the 
spirit of our best young women to want to lead a life of ser- 
vice, which requires of them devotion, mind and untiring 
bodies. It is to this class of young women, who stand ready 
with everything in them to be drawn upon, that the State has 
wisely intrusted its wards when they have left the school. At 
present we must select our visitors from the candidates given 
us by the Civil Service Commission, and the burden rests with 
them to supply us with the same high standard of visitor whom 
we have had heretofore. These visitors receive the girls from 
the officers of the school. In order to gauge wisely the possi- 
bilities of the new place and environment for her ward, the 
visitor must fully acquaint herself with the girl's former life. 

There should be free intercourse between the officers of the 
school and the visitors, so that each may profit by the other's 
knowledge and carry the girl's life as a unit in her mind. It is 
only a small part of the girls who come from the institution 
who £0 directlv to their homes. Of the 72 oirls sent out this 
year 18 went directly home. The home has previously failed 
to control the girl, and former surroundings and associates 
are too compelling toward the old life, even if the new life has 
been awakened. It is often unfair to the girl to throw her at 
once into the old environment. First she must be given an op- 
portunity to struggle with life's temptations under more favor- 
able conditions. We usually find these conditions in housework 
in a new locality. Here the girl is responsible to strangers, 
who demand faithful work. This in itself is a great incentive 
to the girl and is a sort of continuation of the school training. 
We try to put the girls in homes where they are made one of 
the family, and have an opportunity to share family pleasures 
and go to church with the family. This makes a natural 
relationship and helps tin 1 girl on to her feet. Once in the 
world, after a short time everything in her surges to the 
surface, and it is upon th(» delicate, strong understanding of 
her visitor that the girl's welfare Largely depends. 



22 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

When the girls first come out from the school they frequently 
need a change of place, not through any fault of the home 
found for them, nor through any shortcoming of the school, 
or in their visitor ; but what is enough for the normal girl is 
not enough for our girls. If they could get from the same 
conditions what the normal girl could get all would be well, 
but they cannot. Their unstable, slim characters have not 
gained the necessary experience to steady them under the dis- 
tractions of the world. Too much must not be expected of 
them. If they are gradually climbing up in some one direc- 
tion this is enough, but let the visitor be sure that improve- 
ment is going on in one or more directions. There is more for 
the visitor to do than form a right understanding of the girl, 
for the girl can never be considered by herself; her family or 
the household of which she is a member is always a part of 
her. The visitor must gain the co-operation of the family in 
order to do the best for the girl. Occasionally a wise, sympa- 
thetic mistress of the house is the best help a visitor can get 
as to the needs of her ward. It is seldom a difficult thing to 
establish a close relationship between the girl and her visitor, 
for in the beginning the girl is thrown upon her visitor as her 
only friend. Leaving the school atmosphere, where the girls 
are the chief object of interest, she goes where her interests 
are subordinate to every other person's. Returning to the 
world is a lonely process ; human nature is very dependent 
and seldom disregards friendship and interest. 

In addition to the paid visitors, Miss Dewson, the superin- 
tendent of probation, has organized a force of thirty-three local 
volunteer visitors, whose travelling expenses are refunded by 
the State. These volunteers from all over the State come to 
know what our school stands for. They can be a means of 
making sacred to the community the lives of our girls. They 
investigate the homes of the newly committed girls who come 
from their localities, and visit them when they are placed out 
in their vicinity. They know the resources of their own town. 
By frequent correspondence with Miss Dewson, who gathers 
them together twice a year in conference, they learn to under- 
stand her high standard of work, and can bring their isolated 
experiences within the sphere of larger principles. 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 23 

R. came to school in 1902, when she was fourteen years old. 
Her mother had been a Lancaster girl ; her stepfather had a 
criminal record ; except for the primitive love of her mother, 
who looked like a hunted creature, R. had seen and known 
only brutality, hardship and starvation in her home. When 
R. had been tried out, and was returned to the school after 
giving birth to her baby in Tewksbury (having worked out for 
a few months with her baby), she was a hard, cold creature, 
whose selfish nature had not been touched by her child. My 
first acquaintance with R. was on being called by the matron of 
the cottage to see a girl who the matron thought was endanger- 
ing her child's life by her cruel neglect. I saw a pretty girl, 
literally with no outlook in her face, the embodiment of bitter 
discontent, rough with her child and complaining of it. She 
seemed hopeless. There was one ray of light only, — her 
feeling for her mother, who was being brutally treated by R.'s 
stepfather, who could not be roused, even by his starving chil- 
dren. An unforeseen thing happened ; R., through a mistake, 
thought that her baby was going to be taken away from her. 
This brought her to her senses, and she clung to her child. Thus 
love for her child was born. It is two or three years now and 
R.'s story is a long one. She has another fatherless baby; 
temptations have been many and constant to this shallow, 
pleasure-loving nature. R. has been devoted to her first baby. 
Many have been the efforts which at times she has made for 
the support of this child. Sad and painful was the look in her 
face when Jier second trouble began, and R., who was natur- 
ally truthful, told a series of lies, a shut, unresponsive look 
in her face telling the truth to her visitor which she refused 
to tell. She is now living off in the country, among hard- 
working people of her own kind, pluckily supporting herself 
and her second child, working hard to do her best, grateful to 
her visitor; writing that her elder child has an ideal home with 
her aunt near by. In addition to the housework R. is giv- 
ing her employer lessons on the piano, and is giving the school 
teacher, who is boarding with them, one lesson a week in sing- 
ing, for which she is paid fifty cents. She has been invited to 
sing in the choir at church. Her visitor i> privately paying 
the board of the first child, which she says she will continue to 



24 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

help to do as long as R. does her best. R. owes her present 
well-being to the intelligent understanding and the untiring 
devotion of her volunteer visitor. We do not class R. as doing 
well. She may not continue to do so ; but if souls are worth 
saving, what has been born in this girl ? Has the story of this 
girl been worth her visiting? 

This story is given as one of the desperate cases. Real fail- 
ures we do have, but the number is small when those classed as 
failures are only 20 per cent, of the whole number. Of the 69 
girls who are doing well of those who came of age this year, 54 
had never been returned to the school for unchastity ; the other 
15, who are now doing well, had been returned for unchastity 
at some period of their probation. 

In a few cases, after a girl has been out two or three years, 
through right and patient management she has often gained so 
much in adjustment to the world that she can be trusted to go 
home, or go to work under much more independent conditions, 
and thereafter the visitor acts largely as an adviser and friend. 

The following is the story of a gentle, refined girl, whose 
shortcomings are chiefly negative. After two or three years 
of encouragement and effort S. has been independent for three 
years, working in a factory and living in a family, the mother 
being one of those women who does every one good who comes 
in contact with her. S. is engaged to an excellent young man. 
They are devoted to each other, and some day in the near 
future she will make him a good wife. But, like all of us, she 
has her weaknesses, and one of them is the desire to look like 
a lady and wear fine clothes. Her young man belongs to 
various societies, and likes to have S. go with him on ladies' 
night. One day she wrote her visitor that she had broken her 
engagement, given back her watch, bracelet, etc., as she had 
nothing to wear to the entertainment to which her friend wanted 
to take her. It was not difficult to get a pretty silk waist for 
S. and in this way reunite the lovers. 

For those who have not had actual experience in our proba- 
tion department it is hard to imagine how, starting a pessimist, 
one becomes an optimist, through watching the effort for self- 
control and better things made by girls who, by inheritance 
and environment, have so little chance in life, but who become 
useful and good women when they are first given the initial 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 25 

training of the school, and then are befriended by a wise, sym- 
pathetic visitor, who puts them in the way of the best condi- 
tions, and then keeps an ever- watchful eye on these changing 
conditions. It makes one feel that no effort is too great in 
behalf of young people through the uncertain years of ado- 
lescence. 

The special appropriations asked for last year were $30,000 
for a new cottage, to meet increased commitments, and $2,400 
for small heaters in the several cottages, to afford a better sup- 
ply of hot water for bathing purposes. 

The special appropriations which will be asked for this year 
are : — 

For enlarging the chapel, $7,500. 

For fire protection, according to recommendation of Inspector 
Dyson, $3,000. 

For furnishing the new cottage, which will be ready for 
occupancy in the spring, $2,500. 

For equipping an office behind the superintendent's house, 
$2,000. 

To pay bills rendered by J. J. von Valkenberg, for plans 
and services from 1902 to date, in connection with sewer bed 
recommended by the State Board of Health, $341.88. 

The school opened the year with 221 girls and closed with 
243, the average being 228. There were 107 new commit- 
ments, which were 7 less than the year previous. Nevertheless, 
the school closed the year with 22 more girls than the year be- 
fore. The appropriations for the institution were : for salaries, 
$22,818.37, and for other current expenses, $28,725, — a total 
of $51,543.37. In addition, a deficit of $2,356.10 was in- 
curred (chiefly due to increase in prices), bringing the cost of 
the institution to $5 3, 89!). 47. The appropriation for boarding 
out ami probation was $12,800, of which $2,60 1.** was expended 
directly upon the girls for travelling expenses, hoard of special 
9, medical care, etc., and $10, 169.98 for salaries and travel- 
ling expenses of visitors, and office expenses of the department. 
The per capita cost of the institution was $4.49 a week, and of 
the girls outside the school approximately 51 cents a week. 
This gives an approximate weekly per capita of $2.50 for the 
whole number of girls in the care of the trustee-. 



Appendix A. 



TRUST FUNDS 

OF 

LYMAN AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS. 

1906-1907. 



TEUST FUNDS OF LYMAN AND INDUS- 
TEIAL SCHOOLS. 



[Held by the Treasurer and Receiver-General, under chapter 407 of the Acts of 1906.] 

Lyman School, Lyman Fund. 





Cash. 


Securities. 


Total. 


Balance Nov. 30, 1906, 


$602 70 


$35,182 98 


$35,785 68 


Receipts in 1906-1907. 
Income of investments, 
Boston Juvenile Court, 
Securities matured and trans- 
ferred, 

Securities purchased, . 


1,611 63 
18 00 

4,100 00 


1,000 00 


1,611 63 

18 00 


Payments in 1906-1907. 
Lyman School for 

Boys, . . .$4,193 40 
Securities purchased, . 1,000 00 


$6,332 33 
5,193 40 


$36,182 98 
4,100 00 


$37,415 31 
4,193 40 


Securities matured and trans- 
ferred 




Balance Nov. 30, 1907, 


$1,138 93 


$32,082 98 


$33,221 91 


Present Investments. 

Boston & Albany Railroad Com- 
pany certificate of stock, . 

Citizens Nat'l Hank of Worcester 
certificate of stock, . 

Northern Pacific & Great North- 


$300 00 
4,000 00 






ern Railroad Company coupon 
bond, 

Worcester Trust Company cer- 
tificate of stock, 

Athol coupon bond, 

Everett registered bond, 

Easthampton note, 

Norfolk County note, . 

Norwood notes, .... 


5,000 00 

400 00 
2,000 00 
3,0<>0 00 
6,000 00 
1,3*2 98 
10,000 00 






Cash on hand Nov. 30, 1907, 


$32,082 98 
1,138 93 


$33,221 91 







30 



TRUST FUNDS. 



[Deo. 



Lyman School, 


Lyman Trust Fund. 






Cash. 


Securities. 


Total. 


Balance Nov. 30, 1906, 

No transactions in 1906-1907. 

Balance Nov. 30, 1907, 

Present Investments. 

Boston & Albany Railroad Com- 
pany certificate of stock, . 

Chicago Junction and Union 
Stock Yards Company coupon 
bond, 

New London Railroad Company 
certificate of stock, . 


$14,000 00 

5,000 00 
1,000 00 


|20,000 00 
$20,000 00 


$20,000 00 
$20,000 00 

$20,000 00 







Income Lyman School, Lyman Trust Fund. 




Balance Nov. 30, 1906, 

Receipts in 1906-1907. 
Income of investments, 


1778 61 
1,551 68 




$778 61 
1,551 68 


No payments in 1906-1907. 
Balance Nov. 30, 1907, 

Present Investment. 
Cash on hand Nov. 30, 1907, 


$2,330 29 
$2,330 29 


$2,330 29 
$2,330 29 

$2,330 29 



Lyman School, Lamb Fund. 



Balance Nov. 30, 1906, 

No transactions in 1906-1907. 

Balance Nov. 30, 1907, 

Present Investment. 
Athol coupon bond, 




$1,000 00 
$1,000 00 



$1,000 00 
$1,000 00 

$1,000 00 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



31 



Income Lyman School, Lamb Fund. 





Cash. 


Securities. 


Total. 


Balance Nov. 30, 1906, 

Receipts in 1906-1907. 
Income of investments, 


$2,083 83 
102 22 


$ 100 00 


$2,183 83 
102 22 


No payments in 1906-1907, 
Balance Nov. 30, 1907, 

Present Investment. 
Boston & Albany Railroad Com- 
pany certificate of stock, . 
Cash on hand Nov. 30, 1907, 


$2,186 05 
$2,186 05 

$100 00 
2,186 05 


$100 00 
$100 00 


$2,286 05 
$2,286 05 

$2,286 05 







Industrial School, Lamb Fund. 



Balance Nov. 30, 1906, 

No transactions in 1906-1907. 

Balance Nov. 30, 1907, 

Present Investment. 
American Telegraph and Tele- 
phone Company coupon bond, 


. 


$1,000 00 
$1,000 00 


$1,000 00 
$1,000 00 

$1,000 00 



Income Industrial School, Lamb Fund. 



Balance Nov. 30, 1906, 

Receipts in 1906-1907. 
Income of investments, 


$112 19 
43 29 




$112 19 
43 29 


Payments in 1906-1907. 
State Industrial School, 


$155 48 

19 00 


$155 48 

19 00 


Balance Nov. 30, 1907, 

Present Investment. 
Cash on hand Nov. 30, 1907, 


$136 48 


$136 48 
$136 48 



32 



TKUST FUNDS. 



[Dec. 



Industrial School, Fay Fund. 





Cash. 


Securities. 


Total. 


Balance Nov. 30, 1906, 

Beceipts in 1906-1907. 
Securities purchased, . 


$1,000 00 


$1,000 00 


$1,000 00 


Payments in 1906-1907. 
Securities purchased, . 


$1,000 00 
1,000 00 


$1,000 00 


$1,000 00 


Balance Nov. 30, 1907, 

Present Investment. 
Peabody coupon bond, 




f 1,000 00 


$1,000 00 
$1,000 00 



Income Industrial School, Fat Fund. 



Balance Nov. 30, 1906, 

Beceipts in 1906-1907. 
Income of investments, 


$17 74 
26 00 




$17 74 
26 00 


Payments in 1906-1907. 
Accrued interest on securities, 
purchased for the fund, . 


$43 74 
22 


$43 74 
22 


Present Investment. 
Cash on hand Nov. 30, 1907, 


$43 52 


$43 52 
$43 52 



Lyman Fund Expenditures for Year ending Nov. 30, 1907. 



1906. 

Nov. 



Dec. 



10. Lumber for gymnasium gallery, . 

10. Prizes to cottages, 

10. Redemption of token money, 

10. Freight on brick for swimming pool, 

10. Band instruction, .... 

10. Entertainment, .... 

14. Brick for swimming pool, . 

14. Redemption of token money, 

14. Prizes to cottages, 



Amount car riea forward, 



$173 36 
6 00 

100 00 

101 06 
25 00 

5 00 
968 49 
100 00 

9 00 



$1,487 91 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



Amount brought forward, 



Feb. 



1906. 

Dec. 14. 
14. 

1907. 

Jan. 9. 
9. 
9. 
9. 



Mar. 



Apr. 



Honor trips, . 
Band instruction, . 

Prizes to cottages, 

Redemption of token money 

Honor trips, . 

Metal work for tank, 

Games, . 

Games, . 

Musical instrument, 

Christmas expenses (Berlin) 

Games, .... 

Games, .... 

Games, .... 

Skates, . . . ■ . 

Games, .... 

Help for education of boy 

Redemption of token money 

Honor trips, . 

Entertainment, 

Cement for swimming pool, 

Books, .... 

Labor on swimming pool, 

Pipe for swimming pool 

Iron plate for swimming 

Honor trip, . 

Entertainment, 

Pipe for swimming pool, 

Dumb bells, . 

Band expenses, 

Band expenses, 

Pipe for swimming pool, 

Band expenses, 

Entertainment, 

Music, .... 

Prizes to cottages, 

Honor trips, . 

Cement for swimming pool 

Labor on swimming pool, 

Books, .... 

Brick for swimming pool, 

Books, .... 

Waterproofing for Bwimmin 

Honor trips, 

Prizes to cottages, 



pool 



Amount carried forward^ 



g pool 



33 

$ 1,487 91 



23 


70 


25 00 


15 00 


100 


00 


10 


80 


65 


00 


42 


55 


13 


51 


■ 10 


50 


10 


00 


7 


50 


7 


11 


6 


65 


6 


00 


4 50 


100 00 


100 00 


2 


90 


10 


60 


84 00 


34 03 


26 


80 


22 


45 


22 


32 


14 


00 


10 00 


6 


36 


4 80 


4 


56 


3 


25 


2 


69 


1 


95 


12 


00 


1 


53 


6 


00 


3 85 


42 


25 


79 


20 


60 53 


25 


22 


15 


14 


328 


00 


7 


01 


19 


00 


. $2,886 


17 






TRUST FUNDS. 



Amount brought forward, 



[Dec. 

$2,886 17 



1907. 

Apr. 2. 
2. 
2. 
2. 
2. 
2. 


Entertainment, 
Redemption of token money, 
Labor on swimming pool, . 
Pipe for swimming pool, 
Band expenses, . 
Books, . 




2. 


Medal, 




2. 


Band music, .... 


May 


2. 
2. 
2. 
2 


Honor trip, .... 
Prizes to cottages, 
Redemption of token money, 
Labor on swimming pool, . 




2. 
2. 

2. 


Help to boy, .... 

Band expenses, 

Music, 




31. 
31. 
31. 


Redemption of token money, 
Prizes to cottages, 
Entertainment, 




81. 

31. 


Honor trips, . . . 
Books, 


July 


81. 
1. 

1. 
1. 


Band expenses, 

Book, 

Prizes to cottages, 
Honor trips, . . . 




1. 


Entertainment, 




1. 
1. 
1. 


Fourth of July sports, . 
Redemption of token money, 
Bricks, 




1. 
1. 


Fourth of July (Berlin), 
Games, 




27. 


Fireworks, .... 




27. 


Prizes to cottages, 




27. 


Entertainment, 




27. 


Entertainment, 




27. 


Oars, 




27. 


Medal, ...... 


Sept. 


27. 

27. 
27. 
30. 
30. 


Pump for swimming pools, . 
Honor trip, .... 
Redemption of token money, 
Redemption of token money, 
Prizes to cottages, 




30. 
30. 
30. 
30. 


Work on swimming tank, . 
Charcoal for swimming pool 
Rubber matting for swimmir 
Medals, 



Amount carried forward, 



ng pool 



1U 

100 


00 


105 


60 


11 


50 


4 


00 


3 


02 


2 


00 


4 


95 


3 


95 


17 


00 


100 


00 


72 


05 


50 


00 


4 


50 


7 


16 


100 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


22 


95 


20 


00 


7 


03 


1 


25 


18 


00 


14 40 


15 


00 


15 


00 


100 00 


56 


00 


10 


00 


1 


92 


72 


00 


15 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


4 80 




75 


235 


00 


5 


30 


100 00 


100 00 


27 


00 


24 


90 


23 


65 


19 


89 


11 


40 


. $4,438 


14 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



35 



Amount brought forward, 



$4,438 14 



1907. 

Oct. 24. Prizes to cottages, 

24. Redemption of token money, 

24. Entertainments, . 

24. Honor trips, .... 

24. Books, 

24. Baseball cup, 

24. Honor grade expenses, 
Nov. 25. Entertainments, . 

25. Redemption of token money, 
25. Prizes to cottages, 

25. Games, 

25. Entertainment, 



12 


00 


100 00 


20 00 


3 


25 


24 


93 


3 


25 


2 


25 


21 


30 




11 


00 


11 


00 


5 


13 



$4,752 25 

ELMER L. COFFEEN, 

Superintendent, Lyman School. 



Industrial School, Lamb Fund, Expenditures, Nov. 30, 1906, to 

Dec. 1, 1907. 

Celebration, Christmas, 1906, $65 00 

Celebration, Fourth of July, 19^7, 20 00 



$85 00 

FANNIE F. MORSE, 

Superintendent, State Industrial School. 



Appendix B, 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS 



WESTBOBOUGH. 



1906-1907, 



SUPEEINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

Herewith are submitted statistical tables for the twelve 
months' work of the Lyman School for Boys ending Nov. 30, 
1907. 

The number of new commitments, which was 207, is the 
largest number of commitments for any year since the school 
has been established. While the daily average number in the 
school is fewer than it was last year by 8, this is due to the fact 
that during the first ten months the commitments were 20 short 
of the corresponding ten months of last year. During October 
and November the commitments have been unusually large, 
being 47 and 41, respectively, for each. The daily average 
for the current year has been 339.57. There has been no 
material change in the average time spent in the institution ; 
the average time for the new commitment is 14.63 months; 
the average time, including those returned, is 19.41 months. 

The operation of the new juvenile court law is an uncertain 
factor as to the number of boys that will come to the Lyman 
School. One might at first think that it would increase the 
number, but through inquiry I am led to believe that the num- 
ber will probably be increased because the delinquent children 
in various communities are being more closely looked after. 
This being the case, there will probably be a growing per cent, 
in the number of boys sent to the Lyman School. The Boston 
Juvenile Court is to be commended for the completeness of 
records which accompany the commitments of boys. They are 
of great a-sistance to us in acquainting us with the boy's char- 
acter, and in planning his work in the school and out of it. 

Industrial Work. 

The following will show the varied line- of industrial work 
which the boys are pursuing at the Lyman School : — 
Sloyd is taught by the Misses Anna and Mary Wilcox. 



40 SUPT.'S REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

Drawing and the elementary manual training for backward 
boys are taught by Mrs. Fanny H. Wheelock. 

The lathe and forging department is under the direction of 
Mr. Milliken. 

The greenhouse and the culture of small fruits are attended 
to by the boys of Willow Park, under the direction of Mr. 
A. H. Lassel'e. 

The dairy is cared for by the boys of Maple cottage, under 
the direction of Mr. J. Dana Tilton. 

The creamery is under the direction of Mr. Edward Kelly. 
It is run by a detail of 5 boys. 

The hennery is looked after by the boys of Chauncy hall, 
under the direction of Mr. W. B. Smith. 

The general farm and team work is looked after by 5 boys, 
under the direction of Mr. Louis Wynott, the acting farmer, 
assisted by Mr. Foreman Wynott. 

The carpentry and cabinet making are attended to by a class 
of 7 boys, under the direction of Mr. W. J. Wilcox. This 
department looks after all the carpentry repair work done in 
the institution. The shop is equipped with benches and kits 
of tools for each boy, and also electric power machinery of 
modern make. 

The band of 54 pieces is directed by Mr. Wilcox. 

The laundry is cared for by the boys of Gables cottage, 
supervised by Mr. W. C. Morton. 

The tailor shop is run by the boys of Lyman hall, under the 
supervision of Mr. X. A. TTiggin. 

The bakery and general kitchen are run by a detail of boys 
from Hillside, under the direction of Mr. Trask. 

The storehouse is run by the storekeeper, Mr. E. A. Dibbell, 
with the assistance of 4 boys from Hillside. 

The shoemaking is done by the boys of Inn cottage, under 
the direction of Mrl X. A. Hennessey. 

The painting and decorating are carried on by boys from 
Oak cottage, under the direction of Mr. C. A. Keeler. 

The lawns are cared for by a detail made up from the various 
cottages, under the direction of Mr. Gerrish. 

The school building is cared for by the boys of Bowlder, 
under the supervision of Mr. Merrill. 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 41 

The printing office is run by boys detailed from various cot- 
tages, under the direction of Mr. J. J. Farrell. 

The orchard and other light farm work are cared for by the 
boys of Wayside cottage, supervised by Mr. Hoyt. 

The engine, plumbing and electrical departments are under 
the direction of Mr. Nourse and his two assistants, Mr. Kim- 
ball and Mr. Temple. Boys are detailed to the work from 
various cottages. 

Except for special reasons, every boy before he leaves the 
institution receives the work in sloyd, and those showing pro- 
ficiency receive the advanced manual training. Sometimes 
work in the printing office is substituted for work in manual 
training. It should be said here, also, that boys are given 
domestic training, under the supervision of the matrons of the 
various cottages, in caring for the house and in looking after 
the dining service. 

One of the greatest problems to be met is just what occupa- 
tion to give to each boy as he comes into the school. Each 
boy takes part in the academic work of the school and in 
manual training. It is always difficult with boys of the age 
of those in the Lyman School to decide upon what special 
line of industrial work or trade the boy should enter. If 
possible we endeavor to learn of his home surroundings, and 
to give him the special work that will benefit him most Avhen 
he leaves the institution upon his probationary release. 

Construction Woek. 
Besides the above-mentioned industrial work, we have been 
carrying on construction work. A subway has been built for 
(he extension of the heating plant, leading from the subway 
at the storeroom to Hillside, Gables, Lyman and Chaunev. 
This involved the excavating, daring the school vacation, of 
60,000 cubic feet of earth, and the Laying of Bteam mains and 
returns in the 730 feet of extension. The building of the 
walls and the covering of the subway were directed by Mr. 
V. E. Backus and Mr. C. A. Keeler. The laying of the steam 
pipe was done by boys, under the direction of .Mr. Nourse 
and one assistant. 



42 SUPT.'S REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

Fire Protection. 

An excavation has been made for a cistern, to hold 60,000 
gallons of water, as a reserve in case of fire. The concrete 
work was done by boys, under the direction of Mr. John 
Mason and Mr. C. A. Keeler. It is now ready for the water- 
proofing and for the installation of a pump which will pump 
at 100 pounds' pressure 750 gallons per minute. When this 
is fully installed, we will have reason to feel that we will have 
good service in case of fire — a thing that we did not have 
when the horse barn was struck by lightning and burned on 
the 28th of September. 

In all of the industrial work the aim is to teach the boys 
to perform the different kinds of work. The efficiency of an 
officer consists not so much in the amount of work that he 
can do well, but more in what he can teach his boys to do. 
It is also measured by the habits of industry which he can 
instil into his boys. 

Academic Work. 

The academic department of the school is doing good work 
under the direction of Mr. J. J. Farrell and his eight assistants. 
Experienced teachers are putting forth strong efforts to give 
the boys a thorough knowledge of the elementary branches 
and to make up the deficiencies with which they come to us. 

An effort is made to have an atmosphere of high ethical 
ideals pervade all teaching. 

Physical culture and instruction in hygiene are looked after 
by Mr. C. W. Wilson. His department has recently had 
additional and popular facilities furnished from the Lyman 
fund, in the way of shower baths and a swimming pool adja- 
cent to the gymnasium. It will be the aim of this department 
to have every boy in the institution learn to swim. The 
motto of this department seems to be "Cleanliness is next to 
Godliness." 

The work in music is directed by Mrs. Elizabeth R. Kimball. 
In this department, besides the regular vocal music, such as is 
given in the town public schools, much special work is done. 
Very creditable entertainments are given from time to time. 
The boys manifest much interest in this work. 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 43 

Elms Cottage needed. 
The enrollment of the school has increased so rapidly within 
the last few months that we are very much more than ever in 
need of an appropriation by the Legislature for the furnishing 
of Elms cottage, in order that we may have additional facilities 
for the accommodation of the boys. It is to be hoped that it 
may be forthcoming soon. 

Per Capita Cost. 
The large net per capita cost for this year ($5.19) is due to 
the following reasons : — 

1. The prices paid for the goods which we use have been 
from 10 per cent, to 30 per cent, higher than was paid last 
year. High prices have been especially noticeable with refer- 
ence to meat and flour. 

2. Twenty- three head of cattle were condemned by the 
tuberculin test. To restore a portion of this loss we have ex- 
pended $860. 

3. It has also been necessary to replenish the stock of horses 
by purchasing six horses, with which to do the trucking and 
farm work for the institution. 

These conditions have prevailed to such an extent that it is 
necessary for me to report a deficiency of $2,041.44. In this 
connection I would state that we start the year with a good 
supply of fuel and clothing. 

Returned Boys. 

The boys who since their release, because they were not 
doing well, have been returned to the school are still a serious 
problem for us to handle. In the matter of running away they 
are a source of great annoyance Their influence upon the 
younger boys also is not good. More isolation should be pro- 
vided for those boys ; and a treatment should be given them 
that is different from that given to those who come for the first 
time. At presenl they occupy Oak and Inn cottages, and they 
are segregated as much as existing conditions will allow. 

"i our superintendent is awaiting the results of the movement 
tor the establishment of an intermediate school, between the 



44 SUPT/S REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

Lyman School and the reformatory, before making further rec- 
ommendations as to the methods of dealing with these boys. 

The school endeavors to render the delinquent and stubborn 
boys sent to it capable of leading honorable lives in the com- 
munity at laro-e. More and more its efforts should be made 
with the individual rather than with the classes. Each boj^'s 
case should be studied by itself, his needs looked after and 
training given in the direction of his deficiencies. His favor- 
able traits should be strongly encouraged. 

The harmony with which the Lyrnan School probationers, 
under the superintendency of Mr. W. A. Wheeler, have worked 
with the school is a matter of gratification. The probationers 
are endeavoring to carry out effectively the work begun in the 
school. We are glad to note by their reports that many of 
the Lyman School boys are doing well and becoming honorable 
and self-respecting citizens of the Commonwealth. 

The religious work of the institution is carried on as last 
year. Each Sabbath morning the boys march to the town of 
TTestborough, where they divide, each boy going to the church 
of his choice, whether Catholic or Protestant. Sunday after- 
noon the Protestant boys are taught the regular International 
Sunday School lesson and the Catholic boys are taught the 
catechism in separate classes. 

On December 2 a class of 74 Catholic boys were confirmed 
by Bishop Beavin of Springfield. 

The school puts forth every effort to surround the boys with 
the best kind of moral and religious atmosphere. 

Hoping that the Lyrnan School may retain the confidence of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and abundantly justify 
its maintenance, this report is respectfully submitted. 

ELMER L. COFFEEN, 

Superintendent. 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 45 



KEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF 
LYMAN SCHOOL PROBATIONERS. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

I herewith beg leave to present the twelfth annual report of 
the department of visitation for the Lyman School for Boys. 
It should be noted, in so far as the statistical tables are com- 
parative, that last year's tables show records for fourteen 
months, while the tables this year are for the regular institu- 
tional year of twelve months. 

The total number of individuals on the visiting list for the year 

ending Nov. 30, 1907, was 1,116 

Becoming of age during the year, 150 ! 

Died, 4 

Returned to the school and not relocated : — 

For serious fault, 18 

Not serious, 31 

- 49 
Total number passing out of our care during the year, . . . 203 

On the visiting list Dec. 1, 1907 913 

Adding to above number : — 
Transferred to the Massachusetts Reformatory : 3 — 

This year, 15 

Previously, 21 

Runaways from the school : — 

Having been returned from probation, 17 

Never having been on probation, 20 

— 73 

Total number under twenty-one outside the school, .... 986 

1 Twelve other boys came of age who had not heen in the care of the \ letting department 
Within the year. 

- The mittimus is sent to the reformatory with boys bo transferred, and technically they 
no longer belong to the Lyman School. They are now, however, upon release from the 

reformatory, retransferred to the custody of the Lyman SchOOL Ail are Included among 

the boys under twenty-one in the table on page 63. 



46 VISITATION REPOET LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 



Classification of Visiting List. 
Of the 913 boys on the visiting list, 48 (not including those 
in the foreign service of the United States government) are 
classed as out of the State and employment unknown, and 32 
are on the unknown list. The occupations of the remaining 
833 boys, with the number engaged in each employment, are 



shown in the following table 



Army, United States, 




12 


Assisting parents, 


11 


At board and attending school, 


58 


Attending school, 


23 


Automobile shop, 




3 


Baker, 




3 


Barber, 






1 


Barrel factory, 






1 


Bell boy, . 






7 


Blacksmith, 






3 


Bookbinder, 






1 


Bottling works, 






2 


Box shop, . 






1 


Brakeman, . 






3 


Brush factory, 






1 


Building mover, 






2 


Candy factory, 






2 


Carpenter, . 






7 


Carpet mill, 






2 


Chair shop, 






2 


Chauffeur, . 






1 


Chemical works, 






2 


Clerk, 






17 


Coal yard, . 






2 


Conductor, . 






1 


Cook, . 






2 


Core maker, 






1 


Drummer, . 






1 


Dyehouse, . 






1 


Electric lamp factory 


» • 


3 


Electrical works, 




3 


Elevator boy, 




6 


Embalmer, 






1 


Errand boy, 






17 


Expressman, 






2 


Farmer, 






132 


Ferryman, . 






1 


Fireman, . 






1 



Fisherman, 

Forester, . 

Foundry, . 

Gas works, 

Glass factory, . 

Hostler, 

Idle, . 

Invalid, 

Iron works, 

Jewelry shop, . 

Laborer, 

Last factory, 

Laundry, 

Leather factory, 

Lineman, . 

Lithographer, . 

Lumber camp, . 

Machinist, . 

Market, 

Massachusetts Reformatory 

Mattress factory, 

Meat packer, 

Milk wagon, 

Mill (textile), . 

Motorman, 

Navy, United States, 

Nurse, 

Occupation unknown, 

Other penal institutions, 

Painter, 

Paper mill, 

Pattern maker, . 

Plumber, . 

Printer, 

Recently released, occupations 

unknown, 
Restaurant, 
Rope factory, 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



47 



Rubber factory, 
Sailor, 
Sawmill, 
Shipper, 
Shoe shop, . 
Soap factory, 
Steam fitter, 
Straw factory, 
Tack factory, 
Tailor, 



Reduced to approximate percentages, this table will show : 



7 
1 


Tannery, . 
Teamster and driver, 


. 5 

. 44 


1 
3 


Telegraph operator, . 
Tile factory, 


. 1 
1 


50 


Tin shop, . 


. 3 


1 
1 

1 
2 
1 


Toy shop, . 
Watchman, 
Whip shop, 
Wire mill, . 
Wood yard, 


1 
. 2 
. 1 
. 4 

1 



In United States army and navy, about 

At board, 

Employed on farms, .... 

In mills (textile), about 

Classed as laborers, .... 

Massachusetts Reformatory at Concord, 

In other penal institutions, . 

In 82 different occupations, about 



Per Cent. 
5 
6 
14 
8 
3 
4 
2 
58 



The report cards of the above-mentioned 833 boys show 
that at the time of the last report 723, or 87 ! per cent., were 
doing well; 44, or 6 per cent., doubtfully; and 65, or <S per 
cent., badly. 

An analysis of the unknown list shows that — 

17 disappeared this year. 
15 disappeared previously. 

And, again, that of this number — 

18 left place with a farmer. 
8 left home or relatives 

1 1 not located, family having moved. 

The number of boys retransferred from the Massachusetts 
Reformatory to the custody of your Board during the past year 

has been 15. In providing for these boys We have sent 12 to 

their own homes or to relatives, mechanical work was found 
for L, and 2 were sent to farms. Two of these boys have 
since enlisted in the navy, one so conducted himself as to be 

Bo a transferred to tbe M and runaway* Croni the school 

name- are ool upon the visiting li-t are not counted In this Ogure; nut they arc 
counted In the tables given on pagi 



48 VISITATION EEPOET LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

recalled to the reformatory, and the rest seem to be living 
respectably. 

The following tables give the placings, returns, visits and 
collections of wages for the past year : — 



Placings. 

Number of boys placed in their homes when leaving the school, . 
Number of boys placed with others when leaving the school, 
Number of boys boarded out when leaving the school, 

Total number placed out within the year and becoming sub- 
jects of visitation, 



Returns. 

Number of boys within the year returned to the school : — 

For serious fault, 

For relocation and other purposes, .... 



157 
85 
53 



295 



18 
90 



Total returned, 



108 



Visits. 
Number of visits to probationers, .... 
Number of visits to boys over eighteen years of age, 
Number of boys over eighteen years of age visited, 
Average visits to boys over eighteen years of age, 
Number of visits to boys under eighteen years of age, 
Number of boys under eighteen visited, 
Average visits to boys under eighteen years of age, 
Number of homes investigated and reported upon, in writing, 
Number of new places investigated and reported upon, 



2,062 
943 
445 
2.1 

1,119 

438 

2.5 

429 

71 



Collections. 
Amount of money collected and paid over to the Lyman School as 

wages of boys, and placed in bank to their credit, . . .$2,645 37 
Number of boys in behalf of whom money was collected, . . 62 



Boys who are over eighteen usually make their own bar- 
gains and collect their own wages. 

One hundred and fifty 1 boys whose names are upon the 
visiting list have become of age during the year. The folloAv- 
ing table shows their occupation and standing : — 

i Table No. 3, on page 63, gives 162 boys coming of age within the year; this table includes 
all boys committed to the school, some of whom run away, or get into other institutions, 
without ever being in the care of the visiting department. 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



49 



Army, .... 

Baker, .... 

Bookbinder, 

Box shop, 

Brakenian, 

Carpenter, 

Cold-storage plant, . 

Electrician, 

Electric plating shop, 

Elevator boy, . 

Farmer, .... 

Freight handler, 

Hostler, .... 

Invalid, .... 

Laborer, .... 

Laundry, .... 

Lecturer, .... 

Machinist, 

Market, .... 

Massachusetts Reformatory 



iMcssrii 

Mill, 

Navy, 



jer boy, 



3 
1 
1 
1 
3 
4 
1 
2 
1 
1 
8 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
5 
2 
8 
1 
7 
1.3 



Occupations, unknown, 

Organ shop, 

Other institutions, 

Out of State, . 

Painter, 

Paper mill, 

Peddler, . 

Porter, 

Printer, 

Rubber factory, 

Sailor, 

Salesman, 

Salvation Army, 

Shipper, . 

Shoe shop, 

Skate shop, 

Switchman, 

Tannery, . 

Teamster, . 

Theatre helper, 

Unknown, 

Wire mill, 




1 

3 

11 
3 

2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

15 
1 
1 
1 
8 
2 

13 
1 



The above table, expressed in percentages, shows : — 



United States army and navy, about .... 

Employed on farms, about 

In other penal institutions (including the Massachusetts 
Reformatory), 

Employed in textile mills, ...... 



Per Cent. 

12 
5 

8 
4 



The remaining 71 per cent, is divided among thirty-eight 
different occupations. 

By our usual classification of boys in the visiting depart- 
ment becoming twenty-one years of age, !'<>, or 60 per cent., 
•are doing well without question; 21, or 11 per cent., not 90 
well, but honestly self-supporting; 1">, or in per cent., badly, 
11 of them in penal institutions; L3, or '.' percent., where- 
abouts unknown : LI, or 7 per cent., out of the State. 

The following table ' compares the conducl of boys coming 



1 The table Includes all who have ever been on probai onnting In with I 

In the care of the visiting department within the year 9 others, In former years dr< 
from this list, all of them having been transferred to the Massachusetts Reformatory 



50 



VISITATION REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 



of age within the year who have been placed out on farms 
with those who went back to their own people : — 





Standing. 




Of 62 Boys placed on 
Farms. 


Of 97 Boys released 

to their 
Parents or Relatives. 


Doing well without question, 
Not so well, but self-supporting, . 

Out of State, 

Unknown, ..... 
Badly, 


29, or 47 per cent 
11, or 18 per cent. 

6, or 9 per cent. 

8, or 13 per cent. 

8, or 13 per cent. 


61, or 62 per cent. 
10, or 10 per cent. 

9, or 9 per cent. 

5, or 6 per cent. 
12, or 13 per cent. 



It may be of interest to note that, of the boys classed as 
unknown, 5 of the 8 placed on farms were doing excellently 
at the time of their disappearance, and 3 w T ere doing badly ; 
and of the 5 released to their parents, 4 were doing excellently 
at the time they were lost track of, and 1 was doing badly. 

Again, of the 62 boys who were sent to farms : — 

8 are now doing well on farms, earning good wages. 
29 are now doing well in their city homes. 

3 are in the army and navy. 

6 were returned to the school and transferred to the Massachusetts 

Reformatory. 
10 are either unknown or are doing badly. 

6 are out of the State. 



One hundred and eighteen of the 150 boys on the visiting 
list becoming twenty-one years of age were never returned to 
the school for a second term. 

Changed conditions have made necessary methods differing 
in some respects from those of former years. First in the 
conditions of probation it has seemed best to require more 
frequent self-reporting by letter than has formerly been 
thought necessary. Sufficient time has not elapsed since these 
conditions were imposed to determine of what value they will 
be. Our visitors are required to present at our Monday con- 
ference written reports of their work for the week, and all 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 51 

doubtful cases, or those which require special attention, are 
discussed and settled at that time. Besides the close watch 
which each visitor is expected to keep on his boys who are 
doing doubtfully, I, personally, write to each boy thus brought 
to my attention, telling him that his case has been a subject of 
conference, and giving him such directions and counsel as his 
individual case seems to require. By this means I am hoping 
to add my official influence to that of the visitor, both in 
holding the boy to his duty and encouraging his good be- 
havior. In this way I am keeping in closer touch than ever 
with the boys as a whole. 

When the number of boys on probation and the wide terri- 
tory over which they are scattered are considered, the number 
of homes to be investigated both when the boy comes to the 
school and on the eve of his probation, the number of places 
to be sought for and inspected for homeless boys, and the cor- 
respondence necessary to keep in touch with them all, it would 
seem that the demand for another visitor must be evident. 
Three visitors and a transportation officer cannot, in my judg- 
ment, properly do the required work. 

I consider it imperative that a boy should either be conducted 
to his home by his visitor or that he should be visited within 
two weeks at the most of his going home. At this time, when 
both the boy and his parents are happy over his home coming, 
the visitor may call as a friend, explain the terms of probation 
and establish such relations as will lead the parents to call the 
visitor's attention in the months that follow to the first diver- 
gence of their boy from right doing, while the evil ma} r yet be 
corrected and the boy saved from a return to the school. Too 
often it has happened in the past, because of pressure of work 
on the part of the visitor, that complaints have come from the 
parents of serious wrong doing on the part of the boy before 
he could be visited even once. Another visitor would make 
prompt visitation possible. 

Early in the year Mr. Thomas E. Babb, who for three years 
had rendered faithful and efficient service a- visitor, resigned 
bis position to enter private business of a more lucrative nature. 
By bis resignation the department lost a young man most 
thoroughly tit ted for his work, a man who sought in every way 



52 VISITATION REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

to benefit the boys in his charge. His resignation was a serious 
loss to the department. After a delay of one month, owing 
to the handicap of civil service rules, we were at last able to 
rill the position thus made vacant by the appointment of Mr. 
Thomas M. Devlin. Mr. Devlin has entered his new work 
with that high purpose and zeal which must go far toward his 
ultimate success. 

Later in the year, owing to failing health, Mr. Asa F. Howe 
— our veteran visitor, who for more than twelve years had 
visited the boys in the eastern part of Massachusetts, the 
southern part of Xew Hampshire and the nearer portions of 
the State of Maine — was retired from active service, under the 
late veteran retirement law. He left his work October first. 
Of Mr. Howe's personality, — always an inspiration, — of his 
work so faithfully and tactfully done, and of Ms influence over 
his boys and among the homes which he visited, there is no 
need to speak. These records may be found in the hearts and 
character of all whom he so faithfully served. 

The place left vacant by the resignation of Mr. Howe has 
not yet been permanently filled. Under civil service rules we 
have made a temporary appointment of Mr. Charles F. Barter, 
formerly with the Children's Aid Society of Boston. Mr. Bar- 
ter is a young man, possessed of many qualities which are 
desirable in a visitor, and has done his work in a painstaking 
manner. But this department is greatly handicapped in not 
being able to give to him any certain district, as we do not 
know at what date we may be obliged to dispense with his 
services. Of this, however, I am sure : that it was exceedingly 
fortunate for this department that such a man as Mr. Barter 
could be obtained for this temporary work. 

The terms ' ; farmed out" and "bound out,*' as often ap- 
plied to our boys who go into the country and who are placed 
mainly on farms, convey, I am sure, a very different meaning 
to those who do not know the conditions under which they are 
placed than to one acquainted with the real condition of the 
boys so placed out. 

In the first place, boys are not "bound out" by any hard 
and fast contract, which cannot be broken upon the first com- 
plaint of the boy, or at the discretion of the visitor ; and the 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 53 

boy is never "farmed out" in the sense of being placed to 
work for any one's benefit to the detriment of his own well- 
being and financial gain. 

Abundant proof is at hand that nearly all our boys placed in 
the country are in good health, are growing physically and 
developing morally in the quiet and law-abiding communities 
in which they live. More than this, as a rule they are happy 
in their new homes. They become a part and parcel of the 
community. Visiting one day among the green hills of Ver- 
mont, I stopped at a farmhouse and inquired if B. (one of our 
boys of seventeen years) was about the place. I was told by 
the farmer's wife that he was not, but was in some field, she 
hardly knew which one, about a quarter of a mile away. Her 
directions for finding the boy were as follows : ' ' Go out into 
the road and listen a minute or two, and you can locate him by 
his whistle, for he is always whistling." Following her direc- 
tions, in a minute or two a clear whistle came from the brow 
of a neighboring hill, and pursuing my steps in that direction 
I found this happy youngster, digging his one-half acre of 
potatoes, for which he told me he was to receive $30. 

After a pretty careful observation, extending over a period 
of twelve years, in which I have had opportunity to note the 
results of various methods of training, I am fully convinced 
that the experience that the average boy receives who is placed 
in a farming communitv until he is eighteen years of age is in 
no way a hindrance to his taking up any line of work, mechan- 
ical or otherwise, in a town or city. In fact, a boy who brings 
a record of honesty and industry from a two 3 T ears , stay on a 
farm, in ordinary times, never need wait one week for work in 
the city. Then such a boy is not idle, perforce, when times 
are dull in the city, — there is always work in the fields. The 
following instance shows how beneficial such a training may 
be: — 

One of our boys, who had been placed out from the Berlin 
school, wished to learn a trade, and an opportunity was given 
him in a foundry to learn core making. He advanced rapidl}', 
until at the end of eight or nine months' service lie was earning 
Si) a week; then came the financial flurry of the past few 
months and the foundry was closed. The boy immediately 



54 VISITATION KEPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

went into the country, and found work at good wages on a 
farm, having promise of re-employment at his trade whenever 
the works resume operation. 

At this point I desire to introduce a few letters recently 
received from boys who are on probation under various con- 
ditions. The writer of the following letter was practically 
homeless, and at first much averse to taking any place in the 
country : — 

Dear Mr. Wheeler : — As it will not be long until I am eighteen 
I thought I must write and let you know what I have decided to do, 
and I think you will agree with me. Your words proved to be true 
about Mr. and Miss H., for they are, as you said, good and kind 
people ; and if I can have my wish I would like to stay with them 
another year. I have been happy here and Mr. and Miss H. have 
done everything in their power, under the circumstances, to make me 
so. The people here have shown me much attention and given me 
many favors, and I have become very much attached to them. I 
have been well here and have gained in strength and weight, and I 
also enjoy being on a farm. 

Are you coming to see me before long? I would like to see and 
talk with you and, of course, Mr. and Miss H. do too. If you have 
time I wish you would please drop me a line. Mr. Wheeler, I have 
conducted myself in such a manner during my stay here that I think 
it will reflect credit, not only to myself but to those who have taken 
so much interest in me. Hoping to hear in reply, I am, 

Yours respectfully, . Arthur 

We have made unusual efforts this year while business was 
prosperous to secure places in shops for boys who were thought 
to have mechanical ability, but our experience on the whole 
has been disappointing. A boy well brought up is subject to 
great temptations when he goes, homeless and without real 
friends, into a large city. Most of our boys have had expe- 
rience in the shady side of city life and come more readily under 
bad influences. In several cases where there was great ability 
and we had hoped for marked success we have to report entire 
failure. 

The boy who wrote the following letter is one of our successes 
in this direction : — 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 55 

Dear Friend : — I received 3'our letter and was very glad to hear 
from yon. I wrote just as promptly as possible; I got your letter 
Monday night and I am writing Wednesday. Mr. Wheeler, I haven't 
any fault to find whatever, I like my work and I like the town and I 
think I will try to learn the trade that T have started on. I like my 
employer, I don't think you could get a better one, and I am going 
to try my best to do what is right by him. I am doing pretty good 
and hope to keep on the right track. I haven't written much but I 
will try and write more next time. I feel a little tired after work, so 
hoping to hear from you soon I will close. 

Yours sincerely, John 

When a boy goes to his relatives, to those who will carefully 
guard his interests, the reports are most cheering. The follow- 
ing letter is from a boy who Avas committed at the age of 
thirteen years for larceny, had been arrested four times pre- 
vious to his commitment to the Lyman School, was said to be 
an habitual truant and was unmanageable at home. He stayed 
a little less than two years in the institution and has been care- 
fully followed by the visitor. At one time he came perilously 
near being returned to the school, but this was avoided. 

Dear Sir: — I am writing you a few lines telling you that I am 
getting along first class. 1 am working every day since last March 

and I have not lost five minutes. Iain working for the firm of and 

my wages every week are $13.00. I am also putting my money away in 
the bunk, as I expect that I will go into business for myself. I am 
driving a team. I am also staying at home nights. I am in good 
health and I am going to hold on to this work until I can better 
myself. I hope; you are well, and this is all I have to say. 

Yours truly, WILLIAM 

Each year 1 am more and more impressed with the wisdom of 
the establishment of the Berlin branch for smaller boys, and of 
the policy of boarding these little boys out from the institution 
a- soon a- they -how evidence of being teachable. No serious 
trouble has arisen this year in the schools of any town from 
their presence, and many of these little fellow- will undoubt- 
edly never be compelled to take an extended course at the 
Lyman School or any other correctional institution. Many of 
these boys are placed within easy distance of the Berlin school, 



56 VISITATION REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

the master of which always knows their condition and sees the 
boys practically every week. Because of this condition these 
boys have not been formally visited as often as would otherwise 
be necessary. The little fellows generally seem happy and 
normal in their activities and seldom can be distinguished from 
the ordinary boy of the community. The following letters, 
one from a boy near the school and the other from a boy placed in 
New Hampshire, are their own interpreters : — 

Dear Sir : — Received your letter and was glad to hear from you. 
I am going to school now and I am in the sixth grade. We are study- 
ing arithmetic, language, history, reading, physiology, geography, 
writing, singing and spelling. At night and morning I take care of 
the chickens, and every other day I fill the wood-box and bring in the 
kindling. I do not play any games. My evenings are spent in the 
parlor with Mr. and Mrs. C. reading. I don't think of any more now 
so I guess I will close. 

Yours very truly, H. 

Dear Sir : — I received your letter and was glad to hear from you. 
As you will be looking for a few lines I will endeavor to write them. 
I am getting along nicely. We have three cows, three horses, two 
hogs and some hens. I help take care of them in the morning and 
at night I do the same, only I get in the wood and water. I study 
reading, writing, arithmetic, geography, spelling, grammar, history 
and physiology. I play checkers, cards and dominoes. I have sent 
away and got me a watch. One morning I got .up and let the cat out 
doors and he went out on the roof and commenced growling. I went 
downstairs and there were two deer over near the woods. W. went 
to the place where he saw them, but they were gone. He took his 
rifle. I cannot think of any more to write. 

Yours truly, Carroll 

In closing this report I desire to acknowledge the most 
hearty support and co-operation of the superintendent of the 
Lyman School, Mr. E. L. Coffeen, and to express my appre- 
ciation to the visitors and officers of the visiting department 
for faithful service rendered, and to your honorable Board for 
constant consideration and counsel. 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 57 



Financial Statement, 1907. 
Expended for : — 

Salaries of visitors, $4,962 12 

Office furniture, 72 75 

Office assistance, . . 369 06 

Telephone service, 101 13 

Travelling expenses, 3,455 58 

Stationery and postage, 75 80 

$9,036 44 
Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER A. WHEELER, 

Superintendent of Lyman School Probationers. 



58 PHYSICIAN'S REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman School for Boys. 

The number of patients treated in the hospital during the 

year was 352 ; number treated as out-patients 1,073. There 

has been but little serious sickness, though there were two 

deaths early in the year. One boy died of pneumonia and one of 

scarlet fever. Later there were three other very mild cases of 

scarlet fever. The first case developed in a boy who had been 

in the school for months, and we were unable to determine the 

source of infection. It seemed possible that the disease might 

have been brought by visitors. To lessen all possible sources 

of infection we are now having the cottages fumigated at fre- 
es o O 

quent intervals during the cold weather. 

Recently we have had four cases of diphtheria, all mild and 
with so little exudation as to render them doubtful cases until 
the reports from the cultures were received. 

Three boys have been sent to the Massachusetts General 
Hospital, one on account of a very severe burn, one for nur- 
sitis and one for hematuria, which proved to be due to tuber- 
culosis of the kidney. Three boys were sent to the Eye and 
Ear Infirmary, and two to the Westborough Insane Asylum. 

A boy who developed tubercular meningitis was taken home 
by his friends, where he died some two months later. 

Dr. Jelly has made seven visits to the school and four boys 
were transferred at his suggestion to the School for the Feeble- 
minded. 

Dr. Quackenboss made four visits, examined 125 boys and 
prescribed glasses for 10. There should be some better means 
of selecting boys to be seen by the oculist, as quite a large per 
cent, of those seen this year were clearly malingering. A 
move has already been made to have a specialist in diseases of 
the ear, nose and throat visit the school. 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 59 

Every boy received is now examined by the physician. A 
very large number are found to have some abnormal condition 
of either the ear, nose or throat. Many of these cases would 
be greatly benefited by operation or special treatment. Dr. 
Walker of the Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, has been con- 
sulted, and recommends that the cases which in his opinion de- 
mand operation be selected by the physician, and as often as is 
found necessary operated upon at the school by a specialist. 
It seems desirable that some such plan be adopted as soon as 
possible as there are many boys now who need treatment. 

From the report of the dentist I note the following : — 

Two hundred and ninety-seven cleanings, 282 amalgam fillings, 
102 cement fillings, treatments of teeth 77, extractions 227. I have 
made it a point to give personal lectures to the boys on the care of the 
teeth that will be lasting after their departure from the school. If 
systematic prophylactic care of the teeth is not indulged in by the 
patient, in accordance with instructions from his dentist, calcic de- 
posit at the cervical line is usually the result, even though the patient 
may regularly and diligently apply the tooth brush. I have tried to 
give this important part of the work special notice, and have been 
aware of the best results. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. II. AYER. 



60 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



STATISTICS COISTCEENING BOYS. 



Table No. 1. 

Number received and leaving the School for Twelve Months ending 

Nov. 30, 1907. 

Boys in school Nov. 30, 1906, . . . 345 

Received : — Committed, . 207 

Returned from place, .79 

Returned " boarded-out " boys, . . . . 28 
Recommitted, . . . . • . . . .1 

Runaways recaptured, 25 

Returned from Eye and Ear Infirmary, ... 1 
Returned from Massachusetts General Hospital, . 2 

343 



Whole number in the school during the twelve months, . . . 688 1 

Released : — On probation to parents, 152 

On probation to others, . . . . . .78 

Boarded out, 53 

Transferred to Massachusetts Reformatory, . . 15 

Runaways, 22* 

Massachusetts School for the Feeble-minded, . 4 

Eye and Ear Infirmary, 2 

Died, 3 

Massachusetts General Hospital, .... 3 

For self, 5 

To go out of State, 5 

Transferred to insane asylum, .... 2 

Navy, 2 

346 

Remaining in school Nov. 30, 1906, 342 

i This represents 627 individuals. 

2 There were 29 other runaways who were brought back so promptly that they were not 
recorded as absent from the institution. These figures count as separate runaways, the re- 
peated escapes of the same boy. Dealing with individual boys, there were 21 who absconded 
and 27 others who got off the grounds, but were returned too promptly to be counted as 
getting away. 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



<>1 



Table No. 2. 

Monthly Admissions, Releases and Average Number of Inmates. 



Months. 


Admitted. 


Eeleased. 


Average 
Number. 


1906. 








December, 


17 


11 


344.83 


1907. 








January, 


20 


27 


349.07 


February, . 












15 


33 


333.21 


March, 












22 


34 


315.61 


April, 












30 


25 


316.43 


May, . 












33 


32 


323.29 


June, 












23 


24 


314.83 


July, 












37 


30 


321.29 


August, 












33 


22 


329.96 


September, 












25 


30 


332.03 


October, . 












47 


42 


338.51 


November, 












41 


36 


335.83 


Totals, 


343 


346 


329.57 



Table No. 3. 

A. Showing the Status of All Boys under Twenty-one whose Names were 
on the Books of the Lyman School Nov. 30, 1907. 

In the school, 342 

Released from the school : — 

With parents, 480 

With others 97 

For themselves, 95 

At board, 58 

Sentenced to Massachusetts Reformatory : — 

This year, 21 

Former years, 19 

40 

Transferred to Massachusetts Reformatory, . . . 35 
Sentenced to penal institutions other than the Massachusetts 

Reformatory, IK 

Left the State |> 

In the United States army, 12 

In the United States navy, 38 

Lost Bight of: — 

This year 17 

Previously, 15 

32 

Runaways from the school, whereabouts unknown, 29 

Runaways known to be in other institution-; or navy, . h 

37 

985 



62 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL, 



[Dec. 



Table No. 3 — Continued. 
Discharged from the care of the school : — 
Returned to court as over age limit, 
Returned to court, revision of sentence, 

George Junior Republic, 

Discharged as unfit subject, to parents, 
Discharged as unfit subject, to overseers of the poor, 
Discharged to parents to go out of State, 
Discharged by order of Supreme Court, 
Committed to the School for the Feeble-minded, . 
Committed to almshouses and hospitals, 

Discharged for adoption, 

Dead 



10 

1 

23 

6 

1 



72 



1,399 



B. Showing Condition by Ages of All Boys outside the School, subject to its 
Custody, also including Runaways from the School and those trans- 
ferred to the Massachusetts Reformatory. 
Condition of all boys under twenty-one on probation up to Dec. 1, 1907 : — 

Doing well, 731 or 76 per cent. 

Not doing well, 51 or 5 per cent. 

In some penal institution, 84 or 8 per cent. 

Out of the State, 49 or 5 per cent. 

Whereabouts and condition unknown, . . . 70 or 6 per cent. 

985 



Condition of boys under twenty-one on probation one year or more : — 

Doing well, 495 or 70 per cent. 

Not doing well, 38 or 5 per cent. 

In some penal institution, 64 or 9 per cent. 

Out of the State, 48 or 7 per cent. 

Whereabouts and condition unknown, . . . 60 or 9 per cent. 



705 



Condition of boys under twenty-one on probation two years or more : — 

Doing well, . . 361 or 69 per cent. 

Not doing well, . 26 or 5 per cent. 

In some penal institution, 53 or 10 per cent. 

Out of the State, 39 or 7 per cent. 

Whereabouts and condition unknown, . . . 49 or 9 per cent. 



528 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



63 



Table No. 3 — Concluded. 
Condition of all boys under twenty-one on probation who complete their 
nineteenth year before Dec. 1, 1907 : — 

Doing well, 

Not doing well, .... 
In some penal institution, 
Out of the State, .... 
Whereabouts and condition unknown, 



206 or 63 per cent. 
24 or 7 per cent. 

37 or 11 per cent. 
21 or 7 per cent. 

38 or 12 per cent. 



326 



Condition of all boys under twenty-one on probation who complete their 
twentieth year before Dec. 1, 1907 : — 

Doing well, 107 or 62 per cent. 

Not doing well, 14 or 8 per cent. 

In some penal institution, . . . . 20 or 11 per cent. 

Out of the State, 15 or 8 per cent. 

Whereabouts and condition unknown, . . . 16 or 11 per cent. 



172 



Condition of all boys who complete their twenty-first year before Dec. 1, 
1907: — 

Doing well, 87 or 54 per cent. 

Not doing well, 

In some penal institution, 

Out of the State, 

Lost track of : — 
Doing well at last accounts, 
Not doing well at last accounts, 



Table No. 4. 
Coynmilments from the Several Counties, Past Twelve Months and previously. 





24 or 14 per cent. 




23 or 14 per cent. 




15 or 9 per cent. 


9 




4 


13 or 9 per cent. 
162 l 



COUNTIKS. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Totals. 


Barnstable, 


_ 


73 


73 


Berkshire, 












7 


299 


306 


Bristol, 












24 


856 


880 


Dukes, 












- 


18 


is 


\, 












21 


1,338 


1,359 


Frank 1 "m, . 












1 


71 


72 


Hampden, 












22 


569 


591 


Hampshire, 












4 


109 


113 


Middlesex, 












45 


i f 7S2 


1,777 


Nantucket, 












_ 


18 


18 


Norfolk, . 












11 


584 


545 


Plymouth, 












4 


181 


L86 


Suffolk, . 












46 


1,87c 


1,916 


\\ orcester, 












22 


1,01 1 


1,036 


Totals, 












207 


8,6X2 


8,889 



1 This Includes i- boya who are excluded from Mr. Wheeler 1 d page 50, 

-•counts only for hoy-, in the cart- of the visitin- department within the JWr. 



64 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



Table No. 5. 
Nativity of Parents of Boys committed during Past Ten Years. 





* 

© 

00 


© 

© 

*> 


© 

© 


9 

© 


© 
© 


© 


© 
© 


IS 

© 
a 


© 

© 
© 


© 
© 


Fathers born in the United States, . 


8 


8 


16 


18 


20 


23 


u 


u 


26 


21 


Mothers horn in the United States, . 


28 


21 


15 


19 


19 


8 


22 


20 


12 


18. 


Fathers foreign horn, 


25 


18 


12 


17 


17 


8 


19 


16 


14 


22 


Mothers foreign born, 


10 


17 


16 


15 


1 


24 


19 


12 


27 


12 


Both parents born in United States, . 


31 


27 


36 


47 


52 


48 


32 


46 


53 


32 


Both parents foreign born, 


56 


47 


90 


83 


80 


71 


74 


89 


95 


108 


Unknown, ...... 


45 


44 


11 


14 


17 


17 


18 


23 


31 


17 


One parent unknown, 


33 


36 


13 


1 


22 


13 


29 


12 


15 


27 


Per cent, of American parentage, 


27 


25 


30 


35 


37 


36 


30 


32 


32 


25 


Per cent, of foreign parentage, . 


40 


39 


60 


54 


40 


50 


52 


53 


51 


60 


Per cent, unknown, .... 


33 


36 


10 


11 


14 


14 


18 


15 


17 


15 



Nativity of Boys committed during the Past Ten Years. 



Born in United States, 


146 


130' 


142 


158 


167 


153 


155 


171 


200 


173 


Foreign born, ..... 


33 


37 


30 


24 


26 


18 


23 


18 


25 


31 


Unknown, ...... 


5 


1 


1 


3 


2 


3 


1 


2 


1 


3 



Table No. 6. 

Authority for Commitments during the Past Year. 



Commitments. 



Twelve Months. 



By district court, 
municipal court 
police court, 
superior court, 
juvenile court, 
trial justices, 
State Board of Charity, 
Total, . 



Ill 
9 

46 
4 

21 
4 

12 



207 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



65 



Table No. 7. 
Age of Boys when committed, Past Year and previously. 





Committed 


Committed 


Committed 




Age. 


during 


from 


previous to 


Totals. 




Past Year. 


1885 to 1906. 


1885. 




Six 






5 


5 


Seven, 








- 


1 


25 


26 


Eight, 


, 






2 


10 


115 


127 


Nine, 


. 






6 


26 


231 


263 


Ten, 








13 


92 


440 


545 


Eleven, 








15 


201 


615 


831 


Twelve, 








40 


481 


748 


1,269 


Thirteen, 






52 


865 


897 


1,814 


Fourteen, 






77 


1,373 


778 


2,228 


Fifteen, . 






2 


87 


913 


1,002 


Sixteen, . 






_ 


13 


523 


536 


Seventeen, 






_ 


3 


179 


182 


Eighteen and over, 






- 


_ 


17 


17 


Unknown, 






- 


12 


32 


44 


Tota 


Is, . 






207 


3,164 


5,518 


8,889 



Table No. 8. 
Domestic Condition oj Boys committed to the School during the 

H:ul parents, 

no parents, .... 

father, 

mother 

stepfather, .... 

stepmother 

Intemperate father, . 

intemperate mother, 

both parents intemperate, 
parents separated, . 

attended church, 

never attended chnrch, . 
not attended school within one year, 
not attended school within two years, 
not attended school within three pears, 

\\ ere employed in the mill or otherwise when a PI 

Were attending school, . 

Were idle 

i arrested before, 
Been inmates "f other institutions, 

! intoxicating liquor, 

Deed tobacco 

Parents owning residence, 

Members of the family had been arrested, 



Year 



131 

!♦ 

28 

39 
12 

8 

6 

22 

27 

204 

8 

1 1 
8 

l -J.'. 

10 

1 88 

64 



66 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



Table No. 9. 

Length of Detention of 321 Boys who have left during the Year ending 

Nov. 30, 1907. 



3 months or less, 






30 


2 years 2 months, . 


5 


4 months, . 






10 


2 years 3 months, . 


8 


5 months, . 






5 


2 years 4 months, . 


7 


6 months, . 






8 


2 years 5 months, . 


6 


7 months, . 






6 


2 years 6 months, . 


10 


8 months, . 






7 


2 years 7 months, . 


2 


9 months, . 






6 


2 years 8 months, . 


5 


10 months, . 






4 


2 years 9 months, . 


3 


11 months, . 






4 


2 years 10 months, . 


4 


1 year, 






8 


2 years 11 months, . 


3 


1 year 1 month, 






9 


3 years, .... 


- 


1 year 2 months, 






6 


3 years 1 month, . 


4 


1 year 3 months, 






19 


3 years 2 months, . 


1 


1 year 4 months, 






14 


3 years 3 months, . 


- 


1 year 5 months, 






13 


3 years 4 months, . 


2 


1 year 6 months, 






16 


3 years 5 months, . 


1 


1 year 7 months, 






14 


3 years 6 months, . 


1 


1 year 8 months, 






16 


3 years 8 months, . 


1 


1 year 9 months, 






16 


3 years 10 months, . 


. 1 


1 year 10 months, 






9 


3 years 11 months, . 


. 1 


1 year 11 months, 






10 


4 years, . 


7 


2 years, . 

2 years 1 month, 






12 

7 


Total, .... 


321 



Months. 

Average time spent in the institution, . 19.41 

Average time spent in the institution of boarded boys, . . .7.05 
Average time spent in the institution of probationers not boarded, 
released for the first time, 14.63 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



67 



Table No. 10. 

Comparative Table, showing Average Numbers of Inmates, New Commit- 
ments, Returns by Probation or Otherwise for Ten Years. 



Year. 


Average 
Number. 


New Com- 
mitments. 


Iieturned 

for 
Any Cause. 


Placed on 
Probation. 


Discharged 
Otherwise. 


1897-98 


279.42 


184 


102 


201 


46 


1898-99, 










295.52 


168 


197 


227 


55 


1899-1900, 










299.65 


173 


115 


242 


36 


1900-01, 










303.89 


185 


107 


208 


56 


1901-02, 










310.19 


195 


104 


264 


45 


1902-03, 










323.37 


174 


132 


208 


95 


1903-04, 










319.72 


179 


117 


231 


42 


1904-05, 










336.21 


191 


142 


282 


64 


1905-06 (14 months), 






338.13 


226 


178 . 


311 


78 


1906-07, 






329.57 


207 


136 


288 


58 


Average 


fort 


en y< 


jars, 


313.56 


188.2 


133.3 


246.2 


57.5 



Table No. 11. 

Commitments by Months for Ten Years. 



Months. 


on 

© 

OB 


© 
05 
00 


e 
© 

© 


© 

© 


© 

© 


© 
© 


i 


© 
© 


© 

© 
« 


© 
© 


October, . 


18 


21 


15 


31 


13 


23 


8 


16 


25 


_ 


November, 


12 


15 


18 


12 


13 


14 


16 


10 


25 


- 


December, 


10 


9 


14 


7 


9 


11 


10 


16 


17 


11 


January, . 


11 


13 


8 


15 


10 


4 


8 


10 


13 


12 


February, 


12 


8 


12 


8 


21 


3 


9 


6 


8 


6 


March, 


12 


12 


19 


17 


16 


15 


12 


17 


12 


12 


April, 


15 


14 


14 


11 


21 


22 


16 


25 


12 


12 


Hay, 


21 


14 


12 


11 


21 


15 


20 


18 


15 


23 


.June, 


19 


10 


20 


11 


19 


17 


20 


14 


14 


18 


.July, 


22 


22 


13 


15 


20 


15 


17 


20 


23 


21 


August, 


17 


15 


14 


29 


IS 


18 


23 


17 


21 


22 


September, 


21 


15 


14 


18 


19 


17 


20 


22 


15 


18 


October, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


16 


80 


November, 


184 


168 


173 


185 


- 


- 


179 


191 


10 


22 


Totals, . 


195 


174 


226 


207 



68 



STATISTICS KOIAN SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



Table No. 12. 
Offences for which Boys were committed during Past Year, 



Assault, .... 


3 


Unlawful appropriation of horse, 2 


Attempting to take horse, 


1 


Ringing false fire alarm, . . 1 


Breaking and entering, 


21 


Violating rules of truant school, 3 


Setting fires, 


1 


Malicious mischief, ... 2 


Larceny, .... 


36 


Delinquent child, . . . 100 


Obstructing railroad track, 


1 


State Board of Charity, . . 8 


Stubbornness, . 


26 





Exposure of person, . 


1 


Total, 207 


Vagrancy, .... 


1 





Table No. 13. — Some Comparative Statistics. 

A. Showing the Average Age of Boys released on Probation for the Past 

Ten Years. 





Years. 




Year 8. 


1898, . 


. 15.60 


1903, .... 


. 14.50 


1899, . 


. 15.17 


1904, .... 


. 15.30 


1900, . 


. 15.31 


1905, .... 


. 15.41 


1901, . 


. 15.50 


1906 (14 months), 


. 14.83 


1902, . 


. 14.42 


1907, .... 


. 15.10 



B. Showing the Average Time spent in the Institution for the Past Ten 

Years. 





Months. 




Months. 


1898, . 


. 19.90 


1903, .... 


. 19.03 


1899, . 


. 20.40 


1904 


. 20.36 


1900, . 


. 19.27 


1905, . . . ■ . 


. 20.39 


1901, . 


. 20.25 


1906 (14 months), 


. 17.05 


1902, . 


. 19.53 


1907, .... 


. 14.63 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



69 



C. Showing the Average Age oj Commitments for the Past Ten Years. 





Years. 




Years. 


1898, . 


. 13.17 


1903, . 


. 13.51 


1899, . 


. 13.48 


1904, . 


. 13.47 


1900, . 


. 13.08 


1905, . 


. 13.51 


1901, . 


. 13.70 


1906 (14 months), 


. 13.23 


1902, . 


. 13.38 


1907, . 


. 13.19 



D. Showing the Number of Boys returned to the School for Any Cause for 

Ten Years. 



1898, 


.102 


1903, 


. 132 


1899, 


. 107 


1904, 


. 117 


1900, 


. 115 


1905, 


. 142 


1901, 


. 107 


1906 (14 months), . 


. 178 


1902, 


. 104 


1907, 


. 136 



E. Showing Weekly Per Capita Cost of the Institution for Ten Years. 



Year. 


Gross. 


Net. 


Yeah. 


Gross. 


Net 


.... 


U 52 


$4 49 


1903, . 


$4 74 


|4 72 


1899, . 


4 39 


4 36 


1904, . 


4 90 


4 87 


1900, . 


4 7:5 


4 70 


1905, . 


l 68 


4 61 


1901, . 


4 47 


4 45 


1906 (14 months), 


4 90 


4 84 


1902, . 


1 54 


447 


1907, . 


5 29 


5 1!) 



70 FINANCIAL STATEMENT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Current Expenses of the Institution for the Year ending 
Nov. 30, 1907. 

1906. — December $10,313 56 

1907. — January, . . . 9,902 41 

February, 7,081 20 

March, 7,015 02 

April, 10,101 84 

May, 6,053 07 

June, 5,275 16 

July, . 6,129 05 

August 6,242 38 

September, 6,805 87 

October, 7,170 24 

November, 8,958 90 

191,048 70 
Expenditures. 

Bills paid, as per Vouchers at the State Treasury (Acts of 1906, Chapter 
86), for New Cottage. 

1906. — December, $3,736 74 

1907. —January, . 1,000 00 

February, 1,291 87 

April, 720 45 

June 3,649 25 

June, 1,256 63 

July, 218 21 

July, 3,458 03 

August, 474 56 

f 15,805 74 

Special Appropriation (Acts of 1906, Chapter 86) for Dough Mixer. 

1907. — January $486 98 

Special Appropriation (Acts of 1906, Chapter 86) for Changes in Heating 

System. 
1907.— February, $167 55 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



71 



Special Appropriation {Acts of 1906, Chapter 86) for Gymnasium Bath 

Room. 



1907. — April, 
June, 



$348 28 
151 70 

$499 98 



Special Appropriation (Acts of 1907, Chapter 113) for Boarding. 

1907. — February, $1,387 91 

June, 1,390 59 

August 1,119 70 

November, 1,439 59 



$5,337 79 



Special Appropriation (Ac s of 1907, Chapter 119) for Subway. 
1907. — July, $325 39 



August, . 
October, . 
October, . 
November, 



130 40 

1,296 67 

222 71 

168 75 

$2,143 92 



Special Appropriation (Acts of 1907, Chapter 43) for Fire Protection. 

1907. — October, $383 36 

November, 592 55 



$975 91 



Cash Receipts paid into the State Treasury during the Year 
ending Nov. 30, 1907. 

Farm produce sales, $1,187 36 

Miscellaneous sales, 312 09 

Labor of boys, 163 97 



$1,603 42 



72 FINANCIAL STATEMENT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 









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1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



73 



Average Cost per Boy per Day {in 


Cents and Mills). 








Salariks, Wages 
Labor. 


AND 


O 


43 

O . 

sf 
11 
fg 

M be 

O.S 

o 


bo 

a 

CO 

'3 
s 

fci 


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s 

H 


i 

•a 5 

cS (V 

s 

a 


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a 

1 • 
1| 

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1 o 
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*§ 




FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING — 


o 

ll 


cd 


. 

e 
o 

2 

"> 

I 


1 


to 

o 
H 


Sept. SO, 1899, . 


.095 


.072 


.083 


.252 


.100 


.051 


.018 


.077 


.033 


.051 


.039 


.628 


Sept. 30, 1900, . 


.102 


.072 


.086 


.260 


.102 


.065 


.021 


.075 


.057 


.049 


.050 


J.675 


8ept. 30, 1901, . 


.087 


.063 


.099 


.249 


.102 


.047 


.022 


.062 


.062 


.060 


.034 


.638 


Sept. 30, 1902, . 


.081 


.077 


.090 


.248 


.112 


.057 


.019 


.074 


.046 


.048 


.055 


.649 


Sept. 30, 1903, . 


.075 


.073 


.100 


.248 


.099 


.042 


.022 


.085 


.040 


.064 


.077 


.677 


Sept. 30, KM, . 


.090 


.083 


.097 


.270 


.107 


.049 


.020 


.086 


.049 


.054 


.065 


.700 


Sept. 30, 1905, • 


.083 


.081 


.096 


.260 


.116 


.051 


.021 


.054" 


.038 


.063 


.058 


.661 


Nov. 30, 1906, . 


• 0S0 


.083 


.104 


.267 


.092 


.064 


.029 


.066 


.053 


.060 


.069 


.700 


Nov. 30, 1907, . 


.090 


.091 


.101 


.282 


.114 


.074 


.021 


.078 


.042 


.067 


.075 


.756 



74 



FAEM ACCOUNT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 



SUMMAEY OF FARM ACCOUNT. 

For Year ending Nov. 30, 1907. 



Dr. 
Live stock, agricultural implements and farm 
produce on hand, as appraised Nov. 30, 1906, 
Board, 

Farm tools and repairs 
Fertilizer, 

Grain and meal for stock 
Horseshoeing, 
Labor of boys, 
Live stock, . . . 
Seeds and plants, . 
Veterinary, 
Wages, . 
Rent, 



Net gain, 



Cr. 



Produce sold, . 
Produce consumed, . 
Produce on hand, . 
Live stock, 
Agricultural implements, 



Poultry Account. 
Br. 
To fowl, feed, incubators, etc., on hand Nov. 30, 

1906, 

To feed and supplies, . . . . 

Or. 
By eggs and poultry used and sold, 
By fowl, feed and incubators on hand, as ap- 
praised Nov. 30, 1907, 

By net loss, 



$16,909 45 
396 50 
954 30 
175 35 

2,980 69 
107 73 
780 00 

2,478 23 
298 67 
174 50 

1,310 06 
472 46 



$27,037 94 
377 56 

127,415 50 



$1,185 29 

10,986 90 

5,758 50 

6,833 50 

2,651 31 



$27,415 50 



$480 50 
440 08 



$405 34 

417 85 
97 39 



$920 58 



$920 58 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



75 



SUMMAEY OF THE PEOPERTY OF THE 
LYMAN SCHOOL. 







Real Estate. 




138| acres tillage land, $22,419 00 


15 acres pasture land, 450 00 


6 acres wood land, 300 00 


100 acres Berlin farm, 1,100 00 




«oj. OfiQ on 


(f^ljjSUi/ w 


Buildings. 


Administration building, $11,100 00 


Lyman hall,. 










38,000 00 


Maple cottage, 












3,700 00 


Willow Park cottage, 












5,000 00 


Wayside cottage, . 












5,900 00 


Hillside cottage, . 












15,000 00 


Oak cottage, 












16,000 00 


Bowlder cottage, . 












17,000 00 


The Inn, 












1,000 00 


The Gables, . 












9,000 00 


The Elms, . 












22,000 00 


Bakery building, . 












9,800 00 


School building, . 












43,400 00 


Laundry building, 












17,000 00 


Greenhouse, 












1,600 00 


Tool house bowlder, 












50 00 


Scale house, . 












400 00 


Piggery, 












500 00 


Cow barn, 












11,500 00 


Hospital, 












12,000 00 


Ben houses, . 












1,000 00 


Subways, 












6,900 00 


Berlin farmhouse, 












;;.<)>. i» in, 


Berlin bam, shed and tool house, 






1,500 00 


Amount carried forward, .... 


; r .o (>n 


ZO&yOO\J \JU 


. |276,61 



76 



PROPEKTY OF LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



Amount brought forward, $276,619 00 



Personal Property. 



Beds and bedding, 
Other furniture, . 
Carriages, .... 
Agricultural implements, . 
Drugs and surgical implements, 

Fuel, 

Library, . . . . 
Live stock, .... 
Mechanical tools and appliances 
Provisions and groceries, . 
Produce on hand, . 
Ready-niade clothing, . 
Raw materials, 



$6,016 30 

16,505 90 

672 00 

2,651 31 

6,350 00 

1,759 40 

2,692 25 

6,833 50 

24,794 32 

4,375 74 

5,758 50 

9,709 04 

1,670 90 



83,502 m 
$360,121 66 



HENRY L. 



CHASE, 

Appraiser. 



A true copy. Attest: E. L. COFFEEN, Superintendent. 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18 



LIST OF SALAKIED OFFICEES NOW 
EMPLOYED. 



Elmer L. Coffeen, superintendent, 

Walter M. Day, assistant superintendent, . 

Lillie F. Wilcox, matron, .... 

Mable B. Davies, amanuensis, . 

Inez L Eldridge, amanuensis, . 

Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Hoyt, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Merrill, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Keeler, charge of family and painter 

Mr. and Mrs. Enoch Gerrish, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Morton, charge of family and charge of 

laundry, 

Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Wiggin, charge of family and tailor, 

Mr. and Mrs. W. B Smith, charge of family, . 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Tilton, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Lasselle, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Hennessey, charge of family and charge 

of shoe shop, . 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Geller, supplies, .... 

Mr. and Mrs. Ira G. Dudley, charge of Berlin farmhouse, 
Cora Dudley, assistant at Berlin farmhouse, 

, principal, 

William J. Wilcox, instructor in carpentry and band, 
Edward N. Mil liken, instructor in wood turning and iron work 
Charles W. Wilson, instructor in physical drill, 

, instructor in steam fitting and mason work, . 

J. Joseph Farrell, instructor in printing, . 
Anna L. Wilcox, teacher of sloyd, 
Man 1". Wilcox, teacher of sloyd, 
Fannie II. Wheeloek, teacher of drawing, 
Elizabeth R, Kimball, teacher of music, . 
Emma .J. MeCue, teacher, .... 
Bmma F. Newton, teacher, 

Flora .1. Dyer, teacher, .... 

May Knox, teacher, ..... 
Gertrude Bdmands, teacher. 

Amount carried forward, 



$2,000 00 


1,200 00 


350 00 


500 00 


250 00 


800 00 


900 00 


800 00 


725 00 


900 00 


800 00 


700 00 


800 00 


800 00 


700 00 


650 00 


1,000 00 


300 00 


1,000 00 




1,000 00 


800 00 


600 00 


800 00 


800 00 


650 00 


650 00 


500 <)0 


375 00 




100 On 


400 00 


M 


$14,140 00 



7- OFFICERS LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 

Amount brought forward, $14,140 00 

Harriet F. McCarthy, teacher, ....... 350 00 

Lydia R. Hiller, teacher, 400 00 

Belle Menard, teacher, 400 00 

Eldred A. Dibbell, charge of storeroom, 600 00 

Fred P. Trask, charge of general kitchen, .... 800 00 

Julia Trask, seamstress, 200 00 

Susie E. Wheeler, housekeeper, administration building, . 300 00 

Irving A. Nourse. engineer, 900 00 

Eugene F. Temple, fireman, 400 00 

Charles A, Kimball, firemau, 400 00 

John T. Burhoe, carpenter, 850 00 

, farmer, . . . 800 00 

Edward X. Kelley, farm assistant, 400 00 

Foreman Wynott, teamster, . 400 00 

Lewis Wynott, driver, ' . 420 00 

Arthur E, Laneur, watchman, 400 00 

Thomas H. Ayer, M.D., physician, 600 00 

Arthur C. Jelly, M.D ., specialist on feeble-minded, . . . 300 00 

Ernest P. Brigham, D.M.D., dentist, 300 00 

, oculist, 100 00 

, nurse, 400 00 

Ophelia B. Siddell, hospital matron, 300 00 

Vacation supplies 1.296 00 



835,466 00 
Probation Department. 

Walter A. Wheeler, superintendent, $2,0C0 00 

Thomas M. Devlin, visitor, 1,000 00 

Charles F. Barter, visitor (provisional appointment), . . 1,000 00 

John H. Cummings, truant and transportation ofiicer, . . 900 00 



$4,900 00 
Advisory Physicians, unpaid. 
Dr. Orville F. Rogers. Dr. Richard C. Cabot. Dr. James S. Stone. 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



79 



STATISTICAL FORM FOR STATE 
INSTITUTIONS. 



[Prepared in accordance with a resolution of the National Conference of Charities and Cor- 
rection, adopted May 15, 1906.] 



Name of institution : Lyman School for Boys. 
Number in the Institution. 





Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Number of inmates present at beginning of 


345 


_ 


345 


fiscal year. 








Number received during the year, . 


343 


- 


343 


Number passing out of the institution during 


346 


- 


346 


the year. 








Number at end of the fiscal year, 


342 


- 


342 


Daily average attendance (i.e., number of in- 


329.51 


- 


329.51 


mates actually present) during the year. 








Average number of officers and employees 


31 


30 


61 


during the year. 









Number in Care of Probation Department. 
Number on visiting list of the probation department, Dec. 1, 

1907 

Number coming of age within the year, and thus dropped from 

probation department, ........ 

Employees of probation department, 

Expenditures for the Institution. 



Current expenses : — 

1. Salaries and wages, .... 

2. Clothing, 

3. Subsistence, ..... 

4. Ordinary repairs, .... 

5. Office, domestic and out-door expenses, 

Total, 

Amount carried forward, 



$34,007 26 
8,993 25 

13,736 66 
5,110 20 

29,201 32 



913 

150 
4 



$ 9 1,048 70 
$91,048 70 



80 STATISTICAL FORM LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 1907. 

Amount brought forward, $ 9 1,048 70 

Extraordinary expenses : — 

1. New buildings, land, etc., . . . $15,805 74 

2. Permanent improvements to existing 

buildings, 4,274 30 

Total, 20,080 04 

Grand total for institution, ' $ 111,128 74 

Expenditures for the Probation Department. 

Salaries of visitors, $4,962 12 

Other expenses, 4,074 32 

Board of boys under fourteen, . . . . . 5,337 79 

Total probation department, . . 14,374 23 

Grand total, including probation, $ 125,502 97 

Notes on current expenses : — 

1. Salaries and wages should include salaries of trustees or directors, 

if any. 

2. Clothing includes shoes, and also materials for clothing and shoes 

if they are not manufactured in the institution. 

4. Ordinary repairs include all of those which simply maintain the 

buildings in condition, without adding to them. Any repairs 
which are of the nature of additions should be classed with 
" permanent improvements." 

5. This item includes everything not otherwise provided for, e.g., fur- 

niture, bedding, laundry supplies, medicines, engineer's supplies, 
postage, freight, library, etc. 

Executive head of the institution (superintendent) : Elmer L. Coffeen. 
Executive head of probation department : Walter A. Wheeler. 



Appendix C. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 

OF THE 

State Industeial School foe Giels 

AT 

LANCASTER. 

1906-1907. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

Three years ago, before the National Conference of Charities 
and Corrections, held in Portland, Me., I said: "Successful 
study of the philanthropic must, along with all others of con- 
certed movement, be a study of cause and eifect ; a facing of 
existing conditions, a reasoning of whys and wherefores, a sup- 
plying of needs. All problems dissolve themselves into this 
simple solution. No elaborate theories along scientific lines 
can take the place of common sense applied to this simple 
diagnosis, — simple because natural. It is the common prin- 
ciple of disease ; a finding out of the aggravating causes and 
applying the remedy of relief." For six years, the attempt in 
this school has been to demonstrate the efficiency of simple 
methods. 

What is this delinquent girl who comes to the institution ; 
what are the conditions which produced her ; of what is she an 
outgrowth ; of natural or acquired processes ; a victim of cir- 
cumstances of birth or environment, of social, moral or physical 
defects? A getting at the intimate record of the girl means 
getting at the keynote of dealing with that girl. It has been 
a study of the girl as a resultant of special conditions. 

Such an attempt has meant individual study. From the 
first hour of her commitment to the institution, Mary is to 
become, as Mary, a living factor in the school. She is to be 
studied as Mary, dealt with as Mary, and she in turn is to 
contribute to the school her personality. Is it a wonder that 
more and more there is growing up in the hearts of the girls 
a feeling of possession in the school ; a responsibility for its 
responsibilities ; a persona pride in its successes ; a corre- 
sponding disgrace in its failures? 



84 SUPT.'S EEPOET INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

Such a sense of personal responsibility has made possible 
the spirit in the institution the past year. Never during the 
present administration has there been such laudable emulation 
on the part of the girl for the moral standard of her cottage, 
never such unity between cottage officer and girl, and unifica- 
tion of the whole institution. The girl has become a working 
factor of reform. Cases of discipline have been brought before 
the girls, and acted upon by them. In the matter of two run- 
aways from the school, the question of their return to their 
former cottage was finally submitted to the o-irls of that cottage. 
Because of the disgrace they felt the cottage had suffered through 
the offence, the first decision was adverse. When the need of 
the runaway was presented, together with the fact that their 
knowledge of her special weakness might enable them, beyond 
any one else, to help her, the response was immediate and the 
vote reversed. 

C. was a girl of low moral fiber, careless, inert, slovenly in 
habits, an incumbrance to her cottage. She had exhausted 
the ingenuity and energy of every cottage officer in the home. 
As a final attempt, before transferring her to the Bolton an- 
nex, the case was turned over to the girls. There was a 
gathering in the sewing room and the matter was discussed. 
They decided to keep the girl and bring her up to their stand- 
ard. The matron reports that this method has solved the 
problem. 

No greater appreciation of this spirit of responsibility has 
been felt than by the girls themselves. 

One, returning for a week's visit, exclaimed: "I can't tell 
you how I think the school has improved in just this year I 
have been away. Why, the girls are trusted so much, and 
they seem so earnest to prove true, and every one seems so 
happy, and that is what makes people want to be true, to be 
trusted." 

From another, after a year and a half's absence : " Things 
are getting better all the time in the school ; so much care is put 
on to the girls, such responsibilities, and they are so womanly 
in taking them. That is what makes the girls grow womanly ; " 
and she mentioned several girls who were assuming special 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18, 85 

duties in the institution. Privileges have been granted when 
the standard of the cottage asking them warranted, the girls 
making themselves responsible that there be no abuse of 
same. Since spring four of the cottages have rid themselves 
of the iron window grill, but in each case it has been done at 
the request of the girls, after they were satisfied they were per- 
sonally ready to assume the responsibility. In only one case 
has there been an abuse of the experiment. This same respon- 
sibility has made it possible for every strong room on the 
grounds, except that in the Bolton cottage, a mile and a half 
distant, to be removed. 

Such a spirit has not evolved in one or two years ; it is the 
outgrowth of slow processes. What is possible to-day was not 
possible a year ago to-day. 

Following, given as case studies, are some of the products 
of this attempt at growth through personal responsibility : — 

M., after several years' trial the despair of a child-helping 
society, — superficial, weak, just on the border line of fallen 
womanhood, confidence of former friends forfeited, confidence 
in -elf at low ebb. — has, in responsible service to others, found 
herself. A year of getting herself together for the formulation 
of an ideal, — another year of exacting daily duties at the hos- 
pital, have not only proved her desire to take up nursing some- 
thing more than a mere whim, but have developed in her the 
woman. Moral sinews strengthened, faith in self renewed. -he 
has gone out to take her stand as a useful citizen. None have 
been more appreciative of her accomplishment, none more gen- 
erous to accept her worth and the position it ha- brought her 
in the school, than her fellow mates. In her sneeess thev see 
their own possibilities. 

For four months another ha- relieved somewhat the financial 
pressure of the institution by supervising the housekeeping 
affairs in the hospital. Saturday she goes alone to her home 
to spend the Christmas week. I -hall never forget the glow 
o\' her fare when -he said : '• and the best part of it i- that you 
think me worthy t<> go alone, and trust me for the return." 
This from one who came to us with a Long-standing record of 
lawless misconduct, ending in most serious offence. 



86 SUPT.'S REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

Another, coming to us utterly untrained in household duties, 
the cry of lost womanhood on her lips, has twice in the last 
three months made, unattended, a several days' visit in her 
home, the second time for the family Thanksgiving home 
gathering. Hers has been a specialized training in household 
service, — a training lengthened to two years because of the 
necessity for hospital treatment for specific disease. To-day 
she is womanly, efficient, dignified, a power for good, a keeper 
not only of herself but of others. She goes out from us soon, 
the school a loser thereby. 

This week yet another has gone to her dying mother, to 
remain with her as long as she lives ; then, at her mother's 
request, to return to the school for further training. To a 
friendly visitor from the school the mother said: "I tell L. 
I die feeling much more comfortable about her because of the 
friend she has found in the school. I want her always to look 
to them for advice." 

R. was a nervous wreck from dissipation, emaciated, shaking 
as with palsy, muscular control imperfect, unable to dress her- 
self, self-confidence entirely destroyed. First, special hos- 
pital treatment was given ; then came a gradual assimilation 
into the cottage family, with light duties that would identify 
her with the working force of the cottage ; result, recuperated 
physical powers, restored self-confidence, intense ambition 
aroused. A year from commitment she was a most helpful 
girl in the cottage ; a genuine support to the officer, a control- 
ling force among the girls. Her plrvsique and womanly bear- 
ing were sources of repeated comment from visitors to the 
institution. To-day she is a great comfort to a young mother 
of four children, who yesterday remarked to me: "R. is so 
efficient and faithful." 

Another girl was committed as under the average of intelli- 
gence. Observation in the school indicated not so much defi- 
ciency as mental retardation . Her thought processes were slow, 
all attempts were taken up in a child-like way, muscular co- 
ordination was imperfect, and with all there was a consciousness 
of her lack. Her assets were an affectionate nature, faithfulness 
to the limit of her knowledge and a certain reaching out to things 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 87 

beyond her capacity. Three and a half years of slow methods, 
a gradual development of self-reliance and responsibility, placed 
her as one of the leaders in our cottage for backward girls. The 
first placing out was not successful. The girl had worked out 
her own ideal ; she felt the conditions did not meet her case. 
She wanted the care of children ; there were none in the family. 
After two days she returned to the school, alone and at her own 
request. Nine months later she was placed in a family with 
three small children. After two weeks in the family O. writes : 
" Thursday morning Mrs. N. left me all alone with the children 
until twelve o'clock, and I done all of the kitchen work and 
had it all done before she came back and the dinner on cooking." 
Three weeks later : « ' I am as happy as a bird in spring. I am 
fond of Mrs. N. and have not yet showed myself to be cross. 
. . . Mrs. N. has written to you because I would feel more 
easy for her to write than me to tell about myself ; " this refer- 
ring to an enclosure with hers of the following letter from Mrs. 
N. : " Dear Mrs. Morse : — O. wants me to write a few lines 
to let you know how she is getting along which I am very glad 
to do as she is doing splendidly. It certainly speaks highly for 
the school to send out such girls. She is a good girl and always 
so willing, and I feel very fortunate in getting her." 1 

Reviewing the work of the year, I will say that with the ex- 
ception of the sloyd and gymnastics the departments of the in- 
stil ution have been well sustained. Owing to lack of money 
these departments were closed for three months. 

Under the same supervision the policy of our schoolrooms 
remains unchanged. The advanced class, made up of a group 
of 20 girls from different cottages, who in their studies should 
be advanced beyond the average in our ungraded cottage 
schoolrooms, has proven its advantage. The old storehouse 
has been fitted up and serves' as temporary schoolroom. This 
advanced class represents an innovation. It was formed with 
misgivings lest it impair the cottage segregation. Up to date 

i The above indicates how much Industrial training ••an do for a girl of losi mental 
grade while she is under direction. Whether the girl in question lias it in her to develop 
Belf •direction ean be determined only by further experience. The trustees are making a 
study <>f tin' feeble-minded and border-line cases, some of whom have been followed 

through a term of years, and in time they should have valuable data to present. 



88 SUPT.'S REPORT INDUSTL SCHOOL. [Dec. 

we have been conscious of no serious difficulties in thus bring- 
ing the girls together. 

Excellent work has been done in the music department. The 
Sunday evening vesper service has become quite a feature in 
the school. 

To provide new interests for the returned girl, who has pre- 
viously had the general training of the school, a dressmaking 
department has been opened in the Bolton cottage. Here is 
taught a standard system of cutting and finishing. Only girls 
of special aptitude are eligible to this class. It is anticipated 
that the training here will fit the girl to serve w T ith efficiency 
as a dressmaker's helper. 

A year has proved the real gain to the girls of the additional 
domestic training of the bread kitchen and laundry. 

The physician's report gives small indication of the vast 
amount of work covered by the hospital. The individual 
attention here given is a valuable supplement to the case study 
of the girl. There has been a large increase in the duties of 
the nurse. Should the increase continue, an assistant nurse 
will be required. 

Through the generosity of Mrs. Bayard Thayer, the summer 
sports have been made a feature of the year. Baseball and 
tennis equipments sufficient for each cottage were donated. 
Baseball has predominated. I have been surprised at the moral 
force of this game, properly controlled. To our girls it has 
been made to mean self-restraint, mental concentration, good 
judgment, a losing of self for the good of the cause. To the 
officer and girl it has meant a closer relation, through a common 
enthusiasm in the game. One of the worst girls testified to me 
that it had meant in her cottage a crowding out of low ideals 
through absorbing interests. 

One of the crying needs of the institution to-day is a gym- 
nasium, which should represent to the girls in winter what 
these sports have in summer. 

The large numbers of the year only emphasize the need of 
the enlarged chapel. At present it affords but little more 
than standing room. Since it is the only audience room in the 
school, the possibility of social entertainment is limited. 

An entertainment furnished by Mrs. Nathaniel Thayer is to 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 89 

be one of the new interests of the Christmas season. . Mrs. 
Thayer never forgets the girls at this time. Formerly it has 
been a gift to each girl in the school. Father O'Keefe has 
sent for Christmas a box of candy for every girl. Last year 
the W. C. T. U. of Clinton sent a generous donation to our 
Christmas trees, and has from time to time during the year 
contributed magazines and papers. Mrs. J. C. L. Clark of 
Lancaster has also sent magazines. 

The attendance of the girls at the town churches, last year 
an experiment, seems to be a surety. The townspeople con- 
tinue most responsive to our attempt that the girls share some- 
what the interests of the community. Last month 30 of our 
Catholic o-irls were confirmed. 

In some ways the past year has been a hard one. Numbers 
beyond accommodations have introduced new problems. In 
live of the cottages it has been necessary to use an officer's 
room for a small dormitory. It has been impossible to main- 
tain as careful a classification as formerly. In one cottage this 
resulted seriously. A runaway epidemic developed through 
placing in the cottage for our smaller girls two older new girls, 
of runaway record before coming to us. 

The commitments of the year show but slight diminution 
over last year. The new cottage will not fully relieve the 
pressure. 

Increased numbers, together with advanced prices in cloth- 
ing and food material, have necessitated a close study of 
finances. For the first time I have to report a deficit in cur- 
rent expenses. 

The wage question has been another consideration, and a 
deficit in the salary appropriation Avas avoided only by discon- 
tinuing some of the special departments. 

Half of our herd of cows was condemned as tubercular and 
had to be replaced. 

The August drought decreased materially our farm products. 
Grain has cosl more. The farm shows a small debit. 

I make no claim for the institution farm as an investment 
for the State, but I do claim it as a vital factor in the life of the 
girl in the institution. It supplies wholesome employment, 
larger interest and better living. 



90 SUPT.'S EEPOET IXDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

The year closes with 243 in the school ; the maximum num- 
ber has been 249 : daily average, 2'2$ ; commitments, 107 ; 
weekly gross per capita cost, 84.54: net per capita cost, 
S4.49. 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

FANNIE FREXCH MORSE, 

Superintendent. 

i This does not include $600 made as a special appropriation for additional acconinioda- 
tions in cottages, but which appears in the current expenses. 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 91 



REPOET OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OP 

THE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

PROBATIONERS. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

People unfamiliar with court probation work or the placing- 
out system often ask me what our visitors do. To understand 
the duties of a visitor one must know the kind of girls in our 
care, their equipment for life and the difficulties they meet in 
getting safely settled down in the world. 

When living at home our girls were so wayward and self- 
willed that either their parents or the police sent them to Lan- 
caster. They came largely as the result of their environment, 
combined with the badness, ignorance, lack of wisdom or mis- 
fortune of their parents. In the same environment, with no 
better guidance, many girls worry through the difficult years 
from twelve to seventeen without serious mishap, but our girls 
failed because, in addition to the odds against them, their 
character or temperament had some twist or soft spot which 
made success impossible. They are self-willed, high tempered 
or unbalanced, or weak characters loving excitement, with 
nothing to offset strong sexual inclination. Of course a few 
normal girls, with healthy instincts and impulses, come through 
a concatenation of circumstances, such as a sick mot her, a fas- 
cinating girl or young man friend, and mistaken judgment. 

The school has undertaken the large task of sending out the 
girls, anxious to do well, used to doing what some one older 
thinks best, with good habits of behavior and industry, and 
with knowledge in varying degrees of housework and sewing. 
Thev go to their first place, then, with the righl spirit, ex- 
perience of authority and the power to make themselves useful. 
They have weapons for the fight, but the stubbornness or the 



92 VISITATION REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

high temper or the weakness of character is there, — modified 
somewhat, but there, — and nothing except contending against 
the temptations of the world, and trying from day to day to 
adapt themselves to it, will overcome these defects. Few of 
the girls have won the fight even at twenty-one, but by that 
time they know more what life is like, what they have to do 
and be to hold work and friends, and, perhaps, a husband. 

During these years of learning the visitor is the tonic and 
the safety valve of the girl. Picture a young girl, unused to 
a quiet life in a well-ordered family, or to other interests and 
joys beside those of crowded tenement houses and streets, or of 
the social life at the school, placed in a home where the people 
have engaged her primarily for her help, and who, although 
they mean well and understand their responsibility, are not 
always at the same time deeply interested, wise and sympa- 
thetic. The first months in the new life are a difficult period. 
The girl feels lonesome and strange. All her ideas have to 
be readjusted. Her visitor is a godsend, giving her courage 
because some one cares, some one is interested and believes in 
her, helping her to be patient over small troubles, understand- 
ing her heart's desires and showing her how she is working 
toward them. There is often a difference of opinion between 
the employer and the girl as to work or pleasure, which both 
will wish to talk over with the visitor, whose experience and 
tact can remove the friction. 

Without the visitor's encouragement many employers would 
give up the task. Many of them are very kind, warm-hearted 
women, feeling a strong interest in the girl's welfare. Many 
have a real knack in developing a girl. We want all our em- 
ployers to be like this, and we hope to eliminate every indiffer- 
ently good, colorless family that is not a big factor in the girl's 
progress. Even though the Catholic Charitable Bureau has 
assisted us all it could in finding such helpful places, we have 
not yet succeeded in getting enough. The question of places 
consumes a large amount of time. All applications are inves- 
tigated at the earliest moment possible, for the housekeeper 
wants some one, any one, right away, and she does not rely 
on us alone. The locality must be considered. There must 
be no very young man in the family ; it is no less unfair to 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 93 

him than to the girl. A hired man is a great drawback. The 
crucial test of a place is the happiness of the girl who is in it. 
Her social nature must be satisfied, or she will try to satisfy 
it herself in an illegitimate way. Who are suitable compan- 
ions, what is the right conduct towards a young man, and how 
she must bear herself to keep others' respect, are matters with 
which she did not greatly concern herself when she was among 
her own people, and in which she could not get experience at 
the school. She must learn to understand them now if she is 
to succeed. 

It is the employer's part to help the girl to dress neatly 
and becomingly, and to make the small wages of $1.50 to 
$3 a week cover all the expense of clothing, dentistry, and 
little extras, with something to spare for the savings bank. 
The visitor may help out the mother, who has no one with 
whom to leave the children, by taking the girl shopping. 
There is nothing; like such an afternoon for cementing friend- 
ship. Clothes are the girl's most concrete interest, and she 
appreciates help with them when saving her from an unfortu- 
nate marriage would seem nothing to her. 

The girls need considerable medical attention. Dissipation 
and poor breeding and rearing leave their trail. The healthful 
life and excellent medical care at the school do much, but 
the strain of living in the world brings out again the real lack 
of stamina, the impaired constitution. Even though the house- 
work is not too much for the girl physically, it is a mental 
effort to attend to the varied household duties, and to attend 
to them in a way to which she is unaccustomed, for each 
housekeeper does things d i fibre ntly. It is a nervous effort to 
please her employer and get on with strangers in a strange 
environment, under strange conditions. When a girl has a 
cold, the mumps or sonic simple ailment, involving only a 
visit or so, the local doctor is called in ; for a nervous or run- 
down condition, where general advice is needed, one of several 
doctors freely and most kindly gives his services ; and in a 
chronic or difficult case the free clinics arc used. This takes 
much time if not money, yet here, too, the visitor and the 
girl are together, getting better acquainted. One girl without 
a palate was fitted to an artificial one, partly to help her >peech 



94 VISITATION KEPOET INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

and partly because it closed a cavity menacing to her health. 
She came to Boston alone, but it was unwise to let her £0 
to the dental school unattended. This meant many trips for 
the visitor, but it was only humane. The girl, very likely, 
would never have come to the school but for her discourage- 
ment at being different from others. 

Sometimes a girl is so anxious about a sick mother or a 
wayward brother or sister that she cannot settle down until 
we plan for them. In cases of need we arrange for a girl to 
send money home, so that she will feel responsible and help- 
ful. Sometimes a visitor may take a girl home to a funeral, 
or, as the reward of months of effort, for a day's visit. This 
brings the visitor closer to the girl and her people. She may 
find some aunt or cousin who can give the girl the home and 
care she needs. The girl's relatives are usually a source of 
difficulty, but occasionally a real help, — -a big factor in any 
case. The daughters are potential wage-earners, and the 
poorer and more ignorant the parents the harder it is for them 
to believe that the girl, who seems at the school so healthy, 
well behaved and well intentioned, would not be the same at 
home. The experience of the family whose daughter does 
come home before she is really strong enough to withstand 
the old temptations under spasmodically strict and loose pa- 
rental guidance is, unfortunately, no lesson to any other 
mother or father. Parents constantly visit the office. We 
look them up as soon as possible after the girl goes to the 
school, and later, when she is ready to come out. Of course, 
if they are well-meaning people our aim is to get their 
daughter back to them as soon as she is ready. Last year 55 
girls were in their homes or with relatives. Here the visitor's 
greater experience in finding work, her knowledge of trade 
training, classes, clubs at the settlements and the other re- 
sources of the community are helpful. The lax, unwise home 
control, while the girl is experiencing the greater freedom and 
danger lying in factory work and unoccupied evenings and 
Sundays in the old environment, makes a friend most neces- 
sary. The mother needs and wants counsel even more than, 
an employer. 

This year there were 9 older girls who had no suitable home 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 95 

and who were working at some trade, like dressmaking. For 
them we found boarding places. Some girls can get along in 
the freedom of a philanthropic boarding house, like Brooke 
House ; others need more care and are put in private families. 
For instance, one girl, who was very fortunately situated, lived 
with a mother and daughter, the latter being musical. Our 
girl took lessons and practised on the piano evenings. The 
girls shared the sitting room in the entertainment of their 
young men friends. Another girl, beginning as a saleswoman, 
earned her board and lodging in a family of three by being in 
the house evenings with the child whenever the parents wished 
to go out. To find such places takes much effort and time. 

AVhen the girl marries, it might be imagined that the visitor's 
period of vital service was over. Sometimes it is, but often 
the proverbially difficult first } r ear of married life brings the 
girl back to her visitor for advice, encouragement or, perhaps, 
for congratulation. When I see a very young man lurking 
bashfully in our entry I know that he has found the girl who 
was a problem to her parents and to us a problem to him. 

The head of a large and splendidly effective placing-out 
society said to me that the two classes which absorb most of a 
visitor's time are older wayward girls and infants. We com- 
bine both in our unmarried mothers. There are few of them, 
considering that sexual vice is our strongest enemy, but they 
make a special demand on the visitor. A baby docs not pre- 
clude a happy future for the mother. Mother love and a strong 
interest will often hold the girl when everything else has failed. 

The only time we begrudge is that spent on the girls who are 
on the border line of feeble-mindedness. No doubt there are 
many like them in their own homes with parents capable of 
safeguarding them. Our <rirl> come from homes where this i- 
not the case. Placed out, only eternal vigilance can protect 
them. They thrive and an; happy under the well-ordered 
routine of an institution, but they are unable to cope with the 
irregularity and responsibility of family life. At twenty-one 
they are still unfitted to fend for themselves. Failure, ille- 
gitimate children and the corruption of young men will be 
their portion. Docile, affectionate, willing and able to do the 
same thing over and over, it would be but another step in 



96 VISITATION REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

the State's far-sighted policy to gather these poor unfortu- 
nates into communities, where they would be almost self-sup- 
porting. The most pronounced cases are sent to the School 
for the Feeble-minded at Waverley, but there are still others 
in our care whom we cannot help, and who take an undue 
proportion of our time. 

Each visitor has a group of girls who are her responsibility 
until they are twenty-one. She knows the home of each girl, 
the family, the story of the early days, the opinion of other 
people, and the societies which have tried to help her, what 
our school has done and how she has responded to it, her 
physical condition, her life on probation step by step, her 
young men friends, her ambitions, hopes and fears, her weak- 
ness and her strength. She is bound close to the girl by a 
great common interest, — the success of that girl's life. With 
her finger on the pulse she can often forestall crises ; she should 
know the right moment for the experiment of going home or 
starting a trade. With this nearness, which means having the 
girl always on her mind, the visitor's aim is to develop the 
self-reliance of her charge, and to establish her in a real cor- 
ner of her own in the world, where she will be just like other 
people. 

In the statistical tables ( pages,. 99-119) the facts concerning 
every girl under twenty-one years are recorded. 

The work of our office during the past year, exclusive of 
volunteer assistance, is outlined in the following statement : — 

Girls taken to new places, 194 times. 

Girls seen in places, 1,327 times. 

Girls seen in their homes, . 258 times. 

Girls seen elsewhere, 920 times. 

Girls escorted, 890 times. 

Work hunted with girls, 34 times. 

Work found, other than housework, 22 times. 

Boarding places found for working girls or maternity cases, . 16 

Weddings arranged, 4 

Shopping with girls, . . . 166 times. 

Homes visited with girls, 6 times. 

Funerals arranged, . 1 

Hospital cases, 212 

Girls taken to physicians, 98 times. 

Girls taken to dentists, 73 times. 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



97 



Legal cases, 

Court cases, 

Girls committed to School for Feeble-minded and to 

asylums, 

Runaways hunted, 

Runaways found, not counting those found by police, 
Parents, relatives, lovers and husbands seen, . 

Homes reported on, 

Places reported on, 

Employers seen at the office, 

Other people interviewed, 

Girls, applicants for girls, and others visited but out, 
Errands, finding trunks, depositing savings, etc., 
New volunteer visitors enlisted, .... 



nsane 



55 times. 

33 
724 times. 

87 
482 
131 
2,285 times. 
152 
661 
6 



Our expenses for the year were as follows : 



Salaries, 


.86,153 42 


Travelling expenses (officers), . 


. 2,048 64 


Office expenses : — 




Rent (including gas and cleaning), 


. 8387 25 


Clerk and stenographer, . 


. 789 93 


Telephone, ..... 


. 507 51 


Supplies, 


. 292 23 




i qr,7 no 







Total expended for visiting $10,169 98 

Travelling expenses (girls), $684 26 

Clothing 292 37 

Hoard, 1 793 90 

Hospitals, medicine, etc , 2 800 68 

Stammering lessons, returning runaways, certifi- 
cates, etc., 33 67 

Total expended for girls, 2,604 88 

Grand total, $12,774 86 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARY W. DEWSON, 

Superintendejit of Probationers for the Stale Industrial School. 

i of the 1796.90 .-pent for board, (408.21 \\a- for m:i ternll j oases, and (840.69 tor others. 
- of the 6600.68 spent tor hospitals, medicine, etc., 6808.96 was for maternity cases, and 
6498.78 tor others. 



98 PHYSICIAN'S REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 



PHYSICIAN'S EEPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools. 

Since I took charge of the medical work at the Lancaster 
State Industrial School, in January, the general health of the 
girls has been very good. Although there have been a large 
number of ailments, there have been but few cases of serious 
illness, and none but what has terminated favorably. 

All cases of sickness at the Lancaster School are first seen 
by the nurse, and those requiring special attention are reported 
to me. All new commitments and most of the returned girls 
have been taken to the hospital, and there given what atten- 
tion they needed before being placed at a house. 

The eye, ear, nose and throat work has been done by Dr. 

D. F. O'Connor of Worcester. All new commitments, and 
such of the others as needed, have been examined by him, and 
errors of refraction, as well as diseases of these organs, have 
received proper attention. 

The teeth of the girls have been admirably cared for by Dr. 

E. T. Fox of Clinton, and I believe that not only the personal 
appearance but the general health has been bettered by the 
cleaning, filling and straightening which he has done. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. C. BECKLEY. 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



99 



STATISTICS CONCERNING GIRLS. 



Table I. 

Showing Total Number in Custody of the State Industrial School, both 
Inside Institution and Outside. 

In the school Nov. 30, 1906, . ' 221 

Outside the school, and either on probation, in other institutions, or 

whereabouts unknown, 343 

Total in custody Nov. 30, 1906, 564 

Since committed, 107 

671 

Attained majority, 110 

Died, 2 

" Honorably discharged " from custody for good conduct, . . 1 
Discharged as unfit subject, 1 

Total who passed out of custody, 114 

Total in custody Nov. 30, 1907, 557 

Net decrease within the year, 7 



Table II. 

Showing Status, Nov. 30, 1907, oj All Girls in Custody of the State Indus- 
trial School, being All those committed to the School who are under 
Twenty-one. 

On probation with relatives,. .... 

On probation with relatives out of New England, 

On probation in families, earning wages, . 

At work elsewhere, not living with relatives, 

At academy or other school, self-supporting, 1 

Boarded out, 

Married, but subject to recall for cause, 

Left home or place, whereabouts unknown, 2 

Discharged from Reformatory Prison, former years, 



In the school Nov. 30, 1907, 



38 

17 

116 

9 

1 

4 

55 

28 

1 



3 269 
248 



i Occasional help with clothing. 

i Two ran away from the State Hospital, l Dover having been on probation; 7 escaped 
from the school, never having been on probation. Fourteen ran away tin* year. 

3 Four hundred ami Blxteen had been on probation for part or all of the year. 



100 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. [Dec. 



Table II. — Concluded. 
In other institutions : — 

Hospital, '.-.-, 

Perkins Institute for the Blind, . 

Insane asylum, 

School for the Feeble-minded, sent former years, . 
School for the Feeble-minded, sent since Nov. 30, 1906, 1 

House of Good Shepherd, 

House of Refuge, Philadelphia, . 
Reformatory Prison, sent since Nov. 30, 1906, 



6 
1 
6 
11 
17 
1 
1 
2 



45 



Total in custody Nov. 30, 1907 557 



Table III. 
Showing the Number coming into and going from the School. 

In the school Nov. 30, 1906, . 221 

Since committed, 107 



328 



Recalled to school : — 
For change of place, .... 
For a visit, . . . . 

On account of illness, 

From hospital, 

For observation as to being feeble-minded, 
For running away or planning to run, 3 

For larceny, 

Because unsatisfactory, 
Because in danger of unchaste conduct, 4 
For unchaste conduct, 6 .... 
At husband's request, .... 



Individual 2 
Girls. 




8 


9 


7 


9 


6 


9 


1 


2 


2 


2 


6 


6 


5 


5 


10 


10 


8 


8 


16 


16 


1 


1 



70 



77 



405 



i One was on probation 4 years, 9 months, 17 days; one, 3 years, 10 months, 26 days; 
one, 2 years, 3 days; one, 1 year, 5 months, 21 days; one, 1 year, 2 months; one, 7 months, 
25 days; one, 5 months, 27 days; and one was boarded out with her baby for 3 months, 28 
days. 

2 Counting each individual under most serious cause for return during the year. 

8 One had escaped from the school. 

4 One was in her home; 3 had run home from their places; 2 had run from their places; 
2 were in places. 

5 Four were in their homes; 3 were in places; 6 had run from their places; 1 had run 
from her place home; 2 were working by the day, living in selected boarding places. 

8 Recalled girls : 64 were recalled once within the year; 5 twice; 1 three times. 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 



101 



Table III.— Concluded. 
Released from school : — 
On probation to parents or relatives, . 
On probation at work other than housework, 
On probation to other families for wages, . 

Boarded out, 2 

Married, 

To go to husband, 

Ran from the Industrial School, . 
Transferred to Perkins Institute for the Blind, 
Transferred to a hospital, .... 
Committed to School for the Feeble-minded, 
Transferred to Reformatory Prison, . 
Became of age at the school, 

Remaining in the school Nov. 30, 1907, . 





Individual i 
Girls. 

20 


20 




1 


2 




92 


104 




6 


6 




2 


2 




2 


2 




4 


4 




1 


1 




3 


6 




12 


12 




1 


1 




2 
146 


2 
162 

243 



Table IV. 

Showing Length of Training in the School before Girls were placed out on 
Probation for the First Time. 



In pi a 

l'girl, 
2 5 girls, 


2es 




• 


Years. 


Months 

3 






1 girl, . 
1 girl, . 




Years. 

2 
2 


Months. 

7 


l 4 girl, 
l 6 girl, 






• 


— 


4 
6 






1 girl, . 
1 girl, 




2 
3 


10 


l 6 girl, 






. 


- 


9 






1 girl, . 




3 


2 


1 girl, 






. 


1 


- 






1 girl, . 




3 


5 


4 girls, 








1 


3 






2 7 girls, . 




4 


4 


4 girls, 








1 


4 






8 girls, 2 years and over. 




3 girls, 






. 


1 


5 










6 girls, 






. 


1 


6 










6 girls, 






. 


1 


7 










6 girls, 








1 


8 






. 




h girls, 








1 


9 










1 girl, 








1 


10 










4 girls, 






. 


1 


11 










46 girls, i 


nd 


er 2 years 














54 9 


girls, on 


an average 9 


of 1 


year, 10 months, 11 days. 







» Counting each Individual under her mosl recent release. 

t To attend school, l; previous t<> confinement, 8; with babies born at the school, 
the latter r>, 4 were committed pregnant, and l was a returned girl. 

• Released girls: 188 went out once within the year; 13 twice; 1 four times. 

< Was committed pregnant. 

5 one was committed pregnant; l was thought to be pregnant. 

* Had been committed pregnant and was boarded out wits berbaby. 

I Were feeble-minded. 8 Two returned since as in danger. 

9 Not including those who were committed pregnant. 



of 



102 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. [Dec, 



With relatives : — 






Years. 


Months. 


Years. 


Months. 


2 1 girls, . 


3 


1 girl, ... 1 


7 


l 2 girl, . 


7 


1 girl, ... 1 


10 


1 girl, . 


11 


1 girl, ... 2 


1 


1 girl, ... 1 


2 


1 girl, ... 2 


4 


3 girls, ... 1 


3 


3 girls, ... 2 


5 


3 girls, ... 1 


6 






18 girls, on an average 3 of 1 year, 7 months, 27 days. 



Table V. 

Showing Length of Time Outside the School of All Girls returned for 
Serious Cause during the Year who were out on Probation for the First 
Time and had been out Less than Twelve Months. 



Recalled for unchaste conduct : — 


Ran away and have not 


been 


1 girl over 7 months. 


found : — 




1 girl over 11 months. 


2 girls over 3 months. 




2« 


1 girl over 9 months. 




Recalled because in danger of un- 


3 6 




chaste conduct : — 






2 girls over 1 month. 






1 girl over 6 months. 






3» 







i Both pregnant; 1 went home to marry the father of her child. 

2 Went with family to Nova Scotia. 

3 Not including those who were committed pregnant. 

4 One was at home; 1 had been at home but was living at philanthropic boarding house. 

5 One was at home; 1 was in a place; 1 had run away from her place. 
e Three were at home. 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



103 



Table VI. 

Showing Length of Training in the School before Thirty-four Girls who 
had been recalled were placed out on Probation again during the Year. 



Recalled for unchaste conduct 




Recalled for runnin 


g away : — 


2 girls, . 


Mos. 

. 3 


Days. 


1 girl, 


Mos. Days. 

. 8 - 


1 girl, 






5 


- 


1 girl, 


. 9 - 


5 girls, 






5 


15 


1 girl, 


. 17 15 


1 girl, 






6 


- 


3 girls, on average 1 1 months, 15 days. 


2 girls, 






7 


- 






1 girl, 






7 


15 






1 girl, 






8 


- 






1 girl, 






9 


15 






2 girls, 






11 


- 






1 girl, 






11 


15 






1 girl, 






16 


15 






18 girls, on average 7 


months, 10 days. 


Recalled because unsatisfactory : — 


Recalled because ii 
chaste conduct : - 

1 girl, 


i danger of un- 

Mos. Days. 

. 4 15 


1 girl, . 

1 girl, 

1 girl, . 


jmos. Days. 

. 2 - 
. 3 - 

. 11 15 


1 girl, 






5 


15 


1 girl, 


. 12 - 


2 girls, 






7 


- 


1 girl, . 


. 15 - 


1 girl, 






11 


- 


1 girl, . 


. 18 15 


1 girl, 






15 


- 


1 girl, 


. 20 - 


6 girls, on average 7 


months, 29 


days. 


7 girls, on average 1 1 


months, 21 days. 



Table VII. 

Showing Number of Relocations ' of Oirls during the Year. 



69 


were relocated once. 


2 


were relocated five times. 


45 


were relocated twice. 


3 


were relocated six times. 


12 


were relocated three times. 


1 


was relocated seven times. 


9 


were relocated four times. 


— 








139 


were relocated 266 times. 



1 Not counting those who went home, or to institutions, hospitals, etc.. Fifty-four wore 
placed on probation in a family for the first time within the year, Including 4 new 
commitments, 2 of whom were pregnant, ami 2 of whom wore boarded out with their babies. 
Of 126 girls in places Nov. 30, 1907, '20 had been iu same place throughout the year. 



104 



STATISTICS INDUSTKIAL SCHOOL. 



[Dec, 



Table VIII. 

Showing Employment of Girls not placed in Families. 



Assisting mother or relative, 


. 15 


Factory, shirt, . 


3 


Attendant in hospital, 


1 


shoe, . 


4 


Attending school , living al 




silver, 




home, .... 


. 1 


straw, 




Bakery 

Book bindery, . 
Business office, 
Dentist's office, 


1 
2 
5 
1 


watch, 

whip, . 
Housekeeper, . 
Housework by the day, . 


2 


Dressmaker, 


1 


Mill, paper, . 


1 


Factory, aluminum post card, 
chocolate, . 


1 
1 


textile, 
Millinery, .... 


3 
3 


fancy art, . , 
gold leaf, . 
rubber, 


1 
1 

1 


Saleswomen, . 
Total, 


3 

. 57 l 



Table IX. 

Showing Cash Account of Girls on Probation. 
Cash received to credit of 372 girls, from Nov. 30, 1906, to Nov. 

30, 1907, $2,172 48 

By deposits in savings bank on account of 372 girls, . . . 2,171 00 

By cash on hand, not deposited, 1 48 

Cash drawn from savings bank on account of 231 girls, from 

Nov. 30, 1906, to Nov. 30, 1907, 2,785 45 

By cash paid, 2,785 45 

Table X. 
Showing Use of Savings withdrawn during the Year. 

Use. 



To prepare for wedding or start housekeeping, 
Board while learning trade, .... 
Expenses for schooling and lessons, 
Doctors, medicine, glasses, plates, braces, etc., 

Dentists, 

Clothing, 

Board while on vacation or convalescing, 

Expenses for baby, 

Travelling expenses, including express, . 
Board during relocation caused by the fault of 

the girl, 

To repay for money and articles stolen, . 

Funeral expenses, 

Of age, 

Totals, 




$248 01 

15 30 
27 36 
83 54 
80 68 

527 50 
59 43 
61 80 
63 96 

18 14 
7 67 

16 92 
1,575 14 

$2,785 45 



i Including those coming of age this year. One other recently gone home on account of 
illness. 

2 Two hundred and thirty-one individuals, some drawing for more than one purpose. 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 105 



Table XI. 

Showing the Conduct of the 114 Girls who passed out of Custody within the 

Year. 1 

Living respectably, 69, or 61 per cent. 

Having behaved badly, 23, or 20 per cent. 

Conduct unknown, 2 18, or 16 per cent. 

Conduct not classified, 3 4, or 3 per cent. 

i Seventy-one, or 65 percent., of these girls had never been returned to the school because 
of unchaste conduct; 31 had been returned once for unchaste conduct; 7 twice; 1 three 
times. (Counting as returned 1 who was committed to a house of correction; 1 who was 
confined while a runaway; and 6 who were doing badly when they became of age, and 
who had never been returned. Non-classified group excluded.) 

Fifty-four, or 78 per cent., of the 69 girls living respectably when coming of age had 
never been returned to the school for unchaste conduct. 

Of the girls returned for unchaste conduct 1 was a runaway from the school and had 
never been on probation; 16 individuals were in their homes, or 22 per cent, of all the 
girls at home; 26 individuals were in places, counting 5 who were unchaste while run- 
aways from places, or 25 percent, of all the girls in places; 4 individuals were unchaste 
in both home and place and were counted under both heads. (Based on proportion of all 
girls under age Nov. 30, 1907, who were in their homes and likewise of all who were in 
places.) 

Ten of the girls have had illegitimate children ; of the 9 who are classed as living respect- 
ably, 1 later married the father of child, 2 lost their children ; 6 are supporting their chil- 
dren; 1 who is classed as having behaved badly when she came of age has since married 
and is doing better. There are 3 others counted as doing badly who were pregnant when 
they became of age, but who are now supporting their babies and doing well. 

2 Five with friends out of New England; 2 with their people, whole family lost track 
of; 3 married; 7 runaways; 1 transferred to prison, without going on probation, and re- 
leased, disappearing before we were notified. At last report 14 were living respectably; 
3 were behaving badly; 1 never reported on. 

3 Not classified because found to be feeble-minded, or very dull, or insane, and therefore 
unfit for the school or for placing. 



106 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Dec, 



S 

s 



! 

Ss 
o 



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o 


£ TH 


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1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



107 



Table XIII. 

Showing, in the Light of their Parents' Nativity, the Status at Twenty-one 
of 110 Girts coming of Age during the Year, excepting the Non- 
classifiable Class. 1 





Living 
respectably. 


Conduct 
Bad. 


Conduct 
Unknown. 


Both parents American, . 






15 


4 


1 


Both parents colored, 






9 


2 


1 


Both parents French Canadian, 






9 


2 


6 


Both parents from the Provinces, 






2 


2 


- 


Both parents English, . 






1 


1 


2 


Both parents Scotch, 






1 


2 


- 


Both parents Irish, . 






18 


3 


6 


Both parents Swedish, . 






1 


- 


1 


Both parents German, . 






2 


- 


- 


Both parents Russian, . 






1 


1 


- 


Both parents Italian, 






2 


- 


- 


Both parents Portuguese, 






1 


- 


1 


American and English, . 






l a 


1 


- 


American and Scotch, 






1 


1 


- 


American and Dane, 






1 


- 


- 


French Canadian and Scotch, 






- 


1 


- 


French Canadian and Irish, . 






- 


1 


- 


English and Scotch, 






- 


1 


- 


English and Irish, . 






1 


- 


- 


English and German, 






1 


- 


- 


Irish and German, . 






1 


1 


- 


Unknown, .... 






1 


- 


- 


Totals, .... 


69 


23 


18 



i See foot-note No. 3 to Table XI. 



a American was colored. 



STATISTICS IXDUSTKIAL SCHOOL. 



Dec 



c ' ; "-. ■:-■: 



Ta^iz x:~ 

Married Girls met tAeir 

- - -- ■ 



:•:.:" ":-::- s~-^:: 



ly r-L3. -^.-« 


Z5rs3H;«rs 


- : v vl^, .-is*. 




: : y ; : -- , - T '. 


., — ... ^ _ . 




1 ~ ' 4-1 *• - 


7: : = ;s. . .15 1: :1 


- : 


- " - 



- - - ' - - : 
*?r cent. 9 



z XV, 



A ■ 
8og 



a ii 



15 

: 

1 

1 

11 

1 

1 
1 

1 



J. " ; ::.:^ z: irj 
>: r. 
*: -: :-~t. 
Tji : :: fever. 
Hysteria, . 
T'j t:: : : =;= 3 

rTri-lllI-J.-* 

Syphilis, 6 . 



1 

1 

: 

1 
: 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

:: 
-: 

10 

5 

Li 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 18, 



109 



Table XV. — Concluded. 
Hospitals where treated. 



Boston City Hospital, 1 


3 


Massachusetts State Sanato- 




Boston Lying-in Hospital, 


3 


rium, . . . . 


1 


Cambridge City Hospital, . 


1 


Milton Convalescent Home, 


21 


Carney Hospital, 2 


9 


New England Hospital, 


1 


Framingham Hospital, 




Xew England Hospital Dispen- 




Fresh-air Camp, Brookline, 1 




sary, 2 


4 


Harvard Dental School, 1 . 




Xewton City Hospital, 


1 


Haverhill City Hospital, . 




Private hospitals, 


2 


Infant Hospital, 1 




State Hospital, 1 . 


11 


Massachusetts Eye and Ear In- 




St. Andrew's Dispensary, 8 . 


1 


firmary, 1 ..... 


38 


St. Luke's Convalescent Home, 


3 


Massachusetts General Hospi- 




St. Mary's Infant Asylum, 


1 


tal, 3 


45 


Vincent Hospital, 


3 


Massachusetts Homoeopathic 








Hospital, .... 


1 


Cases treated, 


154 



Table XVI. 

Showing the Home City or Town of 107 Girls committed within the Year. 



Boston, 27 


Adams, 


. 1 


Brookline, . 








2 


Athol, 


. 1 


Cambridge, 








3 


Attleborough, 


. 2 


Chelsea, 








5 


Aver, . 


. 1 


Everett, 








2 


Brookfield, 


. 1 


Fall River, . 








1 


Framingham, 


1 


Fitchburg, . 








1 


Gardner, 


. 2 


Gloucester, 








1 


Greenfield, 


1 


Haverhill, . 








1 


Harwich, . 


. 1 


Lawrence, . 








8 


Lexington, . 


. 1 


Lowell, 








9 


Northbridge, 


. 1 


Lynn, . 








1 


Peabody, 


. 1 


New Bedford, 








7 


Revere, 


. 2 


Newton, 








2 




— 


North Adams, 








1 


From 13 tov\ 


'ns, ... 16 


Pittsfield, . 








1 






Salem, 








1 


Floating, 4 


. 9 


Somerville, 








2 






Springfield, 








1 






Waltham, . 
"Worcester, . 








1 
5 






From 21 cities, . . .82 







» Out-patient, 1. 
5 All out-patients. 



3 Out-patients, 35. 

* All for years in care of other societies. 



110 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



Table XVII. 

Showing Technical Causes of 107 Commitments within the Year. 



Stubbornness, 1 . 
Stubborn and disobedient, 
Delinquency, 1 
Wayward child, . 
Assault and battery, . 



. 45 


Fornication, 


1 


. 3 


Idle and disorderly, . 


. 5 


. 32 


Drinking, , 


. 1 


. 2 


Larceny, 


. 15 


. 1 


Runaway, . 


. 2 



Table XVIII. 

Showing Ages of 107 Girls committed within the Year. 



9 years, . 


. 1 


15 years, . 


. 28 


10 years, 


. 1 


16 years, 


.38 


1 1 years, . 


. 1 


17 years, 2 . 


. 1 


12 years, 


. 2 


18 years, 2 . 


. 2 


13 years, . 


. 5 


19 years, 2 . 


. 1 


14 years, . 


. 27 







Average age, 15 years, 5 months, 8 days. 



Table XIX. 
Showing Nativity of 107 Girls committed within the Year. 



Born in Massachusetts, 


. 65 


Born in Canada, 


. 9 


Born in Maine, . 


. 5 


Born in the Provinces, 


. 4 


Born in New Hampshire, 


. 4 


Born in England, 


. 1 


Born in Vermont, 


. 1 


Born in Norway, 


. 1 


Born in Rhode Island, 


. 3 


Born in Germany, 


2 


Born in New York, . 


. 3 


Born in Russia, . 


. 2 


Born in North Carolina, 


. 1 


Born in Italy, . 


. 1 


Born in United States 


. 82 


Foreign born, 


. 20 






Birthplace unknown, 


. 5 



i The charge of stubbornness or delinquency may cover any offence, from the least seri- 
ous to the most serious. The complaint of stubbornness can be made by the parent only. 
Delinquency was combined with the charge of fornication, 2; with idle and disorderly, 2; 
with idle and vicious, 1; with larceny, 1. 

2 Real age ascertained from birth records. 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



Ill 



Table XX. 

Showing Nativity of Parents of 107 Girls committed within the Year. 



Both parents American, 1 . 
Both parents French Canadian 
Both parents from the Prov 

inces, 2 
Both parents English, 
Both parents Irish, . 
Both parents Scotch, . 
Both parents Norwegian 
Both parents German, 3 
Both parents Italian, . 
Both parents Portuguese 
Both parents Russian, 4 
Both parents unknown, 



26 

18 

3 
5 
11 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
2 
5 



American and French Canadian 
American and from the Prov 

inces, .... 
American and English, 5 
American and Irish, . 
American and German, 
American and Portuguese, 
French Canadian and English, 
French Canadian and Norwe 

gian, .... 
From the Provinces and Eng 

lish, .... 
From the Provinces and Irish, 
English and Irish, 
English and German, 
Scotch and Irish, 
German and Russian, 3 
Irish and unknown, . 



Table XXL, on the following page, is based on the court record, the in- 
formation gathered in an interview with the girl upon her arrival at the 
school, the record of the associated charities or of the child-helping 
societies, and an investigation of the home by the school visitors. Il is 
only as thorough as time has permitted. 

i Twenty-four per cent, of whole. Both parents colored, 4; one parent colored, I. 
i Both parents colored, l. « Both parents Jewish, 2. 

3 Both parents Jewish, 1. 5 One parent colored, 1. 



112 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



Table XXI. 

Showing Domestic Conditions of the 107 Oirls committed luithin the Year. 



Both parents at home, 1 . . 39 
Mother only at home, 3 . . 24 
Father only at home, 3 . . 20 
Mother and stepfather at home, 5 
Father and stepmother at home, 9 
Both parents dead, ... 2 
One dead, one whereabouts un- 
known, 3 

Whereabouts of both unknown, 4 6 

Lived with other relatives, . 12 

Temperate fathers or step- 
fathers, 31 

Intemperate fathers or step- 
fathers, . . . . .30 
Been in penal institutions, . 5 
Grossly immoral fathers, . . 5 
Fathers guilty of incest, . . 2 
Temperate mothers or step- 
mothers, 40 

Intemperate mothers or step- 
mothers, 12 

Been in penal institutions, 5 . 3 

Grossly immoral mothers, . 17 
Families on associated charities 1 

records, 16 

Mother or woman in charge of 

the home worked out, . . 20 



No woman in the home, . 

Girl has husband, 6 

Girl has illegitimate child, 7 

Girl previously worked in mill, 

factory or store, 
Worked at housework or caring 

for children, 8 .... 
Worked in boarding house, 

hotel or restaurant, 
Was on the stage, 
Was bookkeeper, 
Kept house, 
Helped at home, 
Attended school, 



11 
3 
3 

43 

11 

5 
1 
1 
3 
2 
19 



Committed as under the average 
of intelligence, 9 ... 7 

Ran away from home just pre- 
vious to commitment, 10 . . 57 

Been under the care of the 

State Board of Charity, . . 17 

Been under the charge of homes 

or societies, 11 . . . .27 

Been in jail for unchastity, . 1 

Been on probation from the 

courts, . . . . . 28 

Been in court before, . . 6 



i Adopted, 3. 

2 Divorced, 1; separated, 1; husband deserted, 1; adopted, 1. 

3 Divorced, 1; separated, 1; wife deserted, 4 (leaving stepfather in charge, 1); adopted, 
2, 1 of whom divorced. 

* Illegitimate child, 1. 
s Xot for unchastity. 

6 Deserted, 2; abused wife who deserted, 1. 

7 Illegitimate children of 2 others have died. 
s In care of other societies, 4. 

9 Two of these proved to be of average brightness, but 9 others were found on observa- 
tion at the school to be under the average. 

io Not including those who stayed out single nights. 

ii Some were successively in charge of different societies, and with the girls from the 
State Board of Charity make 51 cases in 16 different societies. 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



113 



Table XXII. 

Showing Literacy of 107 Girls committed within the Year. 



In 9th grade, . . . .11 


Recently left school, . 


28 


In 8th grade, 








12 


Out of school one year, 


25 


In 7th grade, 








21 


Out of school one and one-half 




In 6th grade, 








14 


years, 


14 


In 5th grade, 








19 


Out of school two years, . 


15 


In 4th grade, 








9 


Out of school two and one-half 




In 3d grade, 








8 


years, 


16 


In 2d grade, 








2 


Out of school four years, . 


7 


In 1st grade, 








1 


Out of school five years, . 


2 


Grade not determined, 




9 






Could neither read nor write, 


1 







114 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



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_ 

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116 



STATISTICS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



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118 



STATISTICS INDUSTKIAL SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



Table XXVI. 

Showing, in the Light of their Age at Commitment {being over or under 
Sixteen Years), the Conduct of the Following Girls: those in the Care 
of the School throughout the Year ending Nov. 30, 1907 ; those coming 
of Age during the Same 'Period ; excluding in Both Groups the Non- 
classifiable Class. 1 





Total 
Number. 


Over 16 
Years. 


Under 
16 

Years. 


Per 

Cent. 

over 16 

Years. 


Per 

Cent. 

under 16 

Years. 


A. — Living respectably. 

/. No longer in the Care of the State : — 
Attained majority (married), liv- 
ing respectably, .... 
Attained majority (unmarried), 

living respectably, 
Died, conduct has been good, 
Honorably di scharged, . 


26 

41 
1 

1 


7 
12 


19 

29 
1 
1 


- 


- 


II. In Care of bid no longer maintained 
by the State : — 
Married, living respectably, . 
Unmarried, with friends, 
At work in other families, 
At work elsewhere, 
Attending school or academy, pay- 
ing their way, .... 


69 

37 

37 

113 

9 

1 


19 

6 

9 

21 

2 


50 

31 

28 
92 

7 

1 


.73 


.59 


Total no longer maintained and 
living respectably, 

B. — Conduct Bad or Doubtful. 

I. No longer in the Care of the State : — 
Attained majority (married), in 

prison or elsewhere, . 
Attained majority (unmarried), in 

prison or elsewhere, . 
Died, 


197 
266 

6 

16 
1 


38 
53 

1 
4 


159 
209 

5 

12 

1 


.68 
.69 


.71 

.68 


II. Still in Care of State, under Twenty- 
one : — 

Married, 

On probation with friends or at 
large, . 

Recalled to school for serious fault 
and remaining, .... 

In prison or house of correction, . 

Were in prison, now discharged, . 

In hospital through their own mis- 
conduct, 


23 

5 

1 

15 
4 

1 

4 


5 

2 

2 

1 


18 

5 

1 

13 
2 

1 

3 


.19 


.21 


Total, conduct bad or doubtful, . 

C — Conduct not known. 
I. No longer in the Care of the State : — 

Married, 

Unmarried, 


30 
63 

3 

15 


5 
10 

2 


25 
43 

3 
13 


.09 
.12 


.11 
.14 


II. Still in the Care of the State : — 

Married, 

On probation with friends, out of 

New England, .... 
At large, having left their homes 

or places, 


18 
13 
17 
24 


2 

1 

2 

10 


16 
12 
15 
14 


.08 


.19 


Total, conduct not known, . 
Grand total, . . . . - • 


54 

72 

391 


13 
15 

82 


41 

57 

309 


.23 
.18 


.18 
.18 



i See foot-note No. 3 to Table XI. 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



119 



1-5 <> 

* g 




120 FINANCIAL STATEM'T INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Current Expenses and Salaries. 

1906. — December, received from the State Treasurer, 

1907. — January, 

February, " " " " 

March, 

April, " " " " 

May, " " " 

June, " " " 

July, 

August, " " " 

September, " " " " 

October, " " " " 

November, " " " " 





$5,004 62 




6,022 47 




5,653 61 




4,179 42 




5,184 42 




5,884 1ft 




5,090 99 




3,222 19 




3,349 95 




3,039 88 




3,723 69 




1,909 97 




$52,264 87 



Bills paid, as per Vouchers at the State Treasury. 

1906. — December . . . $5,004 62 

1907. — January, 6,022 47 

February, . 5,653 61 

March, 4,179 42 

April, . ; . ... , : 5,184 42 

May, 5,884 16 

June, . • 5,090 99 

July, " . 3,222 19 

August, . . 3,349 95 

September, . 3,039 88 

October, 3,723 69 

November, 1,909 97 

$52,264 87 

Bills unpaid, as per vouchers at the State Treasury, . . $2,356 10 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



121 



Current Expenses and Salaries of ttie Department of Boarding 
Out and Probation. 

1906. — December, received from the State Treasurer 

1907. — January, 

February, " " " 

March, " " " 

April, " " " 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, " " " 

September, " " " 

October, 

November, " " " 



Bills paid, as per Vouchers at the State Treasury. 

1906. — December, 

1907. — January, 

February, 

March, . 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, . 

August, . 

September, 

October, 

November, 



Expenditures. 

Bills paid, as per Vouchers at the Slate Treasury. 
Appropriation (act of May 18, 1905, chapter 83) for carpenter work and 
necessary repairs : — 

1907.— January, »31 75 

Appropriation (act of May 26, 1900, chapter 77) for repairs on Elm cot- 
tage:— 

1907. — March, £10 00 

Appropriation (act of May 26, 1906, Chapter 77) for furnishing hospital, 

laundry and bakery : — 



$667 


35 


818 37 


- 838 89 


1,091 


31 


995 


77 


1,095 


33 


1,165 


19 


1,230 


13 


1,107 


46 


1,116 


48 


986 


24 


1,662 


34 


$12,774 86 


JURY. 

$667 35 


818 


37 


838 89 


1,091 


31 


995 


77 


1,095 


33 


1,165 


19 


1,230 


13 


1,107 


46 


1,116 


48 


986 


24 


1,662 


34 


$12,77-4 86 



1907. — January, 
March, 



$58 82 
194 00 



$252 82 



122 FINANCIAL STATEM'T IXDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

Appropriation (act of May 26, 1906, chapter 77) for erecting a store- 
house : — 

1906. — December, $960 82 

1907. — January, -418 45 

February, • 100 18 

March, 862 18 

April 864 12 

May, 12 00 

$3,217 75 

Appropriation (act of June 21, 1907, chapter 120) for construction and 
equipment of a new cottage and for the construction of heaters in the 
several family houses : — 

1907. — October, $1,700 00 

November, 2,728 34 

December, 2,800 00 

$7,228 34 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



123 



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124 FARM ACCOUNT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 



FARM ACCOUNT. 



Dr. 

To live stock, as per inventory, 1906, 

tools and carriages, as per inventory, 1906, 

miscellaneous, as per inventory, 1906, . 

produce on hand, as per inventory, 1906, 

fertilizers, 

farming implements, 

grain, . 

labor, 

live stock, 

services of veterinary, 

plants, seeds and trees, 

harness repairs, 

blacksmithing, 

pasturing, 



Cr. 



By produce consumed, 

produce sold and amount sent to the State Treasurer, 
produce on hand, as per inventory, 1907, 
live stock, as per inventory, 1907, .... 
tools and carriages, as per inventory, 1907, 
miscellaneous, as-per inventory, 1907, 



Balance against the farm, 



$4,782 00 


3,225 00 


2,297 45 


6,011 25 


412 75 


59 26 


3,027 69 


4,126 94 


723 93 


74 00 


163 91 


14 15 


323 26 


32 00 


$25,270 72 


18,954 91 


572 17 


5,743 30 


4,716 50 


3,125 00 


2,253 50 


$25,365 38 


$94 66 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 125 



VALUATION OF PKOPERTY. 



Real estate, .... $197,945 00 

Personal Property. 

Produce on hand, $5,743 30 

Live stock, 4,716 50 

Tools, vehicles and harness, . . . . 3,125 00 

House furnishings and supplies, . . . 25,312 00 

Miscellaneous, 2,253 50 

841,150 30 



WM L. BANCROFT, 
G. K. WIGHT, 

Appraisers. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Worcester, ss. Dec 4, 1907. 

Personally appeared the above-named appraisers and made oath to the foregoing 
inventory. Before me, 

GEORGE E. HOWE, 

Justice of the Peace. 



126 



OFFICERS INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



[Dec. 



LIST OF SALARIED OFFICERS NOW 
EMPLOYED. 



F. F. Morse, superintendent (per annum), . 

G. L. Smith, assistant superintendent (per annum), 
L. E. Albee, assistant (per annum), 

C. C. Beckley, physician (per annum), 

E. T. Fox, dentist (per annum), . 

D. F. O'Connor, oculist (per annum), 

F. H. Mitchell, steward (per annum), 
N. R. Maxwell, matron, Bolton (per annum), 
C. M. Church, matron, hospital (per annum), 
A. M, T. Eno, matron (per annum), 
C. C. Russell, matron (per annum), 
M. E. Mitchell, matron (per annum), . 
K. E. Page, matron (per annum), . 
B C. Foss, matron (per annum), . 
H. E. Hatch, matron (per annum), 

E. B. Mitchell, matron (per annum), . 
I. Walker, bread matron (per annum), 
N. O. Smith, laundry matron (per annum) 
H. B. Shaw, supervisor of schools (per annum), 
C. M. Clark, teacher of sloyd (per annum),. 
M. E. Richmond, teacher of music (per annum), 
C M. Campbell, teacher of gymnastics (per annum), 
A. L. Mead, teacher (per annum), 
H. Dempse} 7 , teacher (per annum), 

G. B. Holden, teacher (per annum), 
C. McMahon, teacher (per annum), 
E. G. Kmery, teacher (per annum), 

E. M. Batchelder, teacher (per annum), 
M. T. Noyes, teacher (per annum), 
M. Boynton, teacher (per annum), 
C. E. Stevens, gardener (per annum), . 
L. D. Parks, clerk (per annum), . 
A. A. Stowell, housekeeper (per annum) 
J. B. Higgins, housekeeper (per annum) 

F. E. Young, housekeeper (per annum), 
S. A. King, housekeeper (per annum), . 



$ 1,800 00 
900 00 
500 00 
800 00 
650 00 
250 00 
650 00 
600 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
400 00 
350 00 
400 00 
350 00 
420 00 
500 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
350 00 
350 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



127 



F. M. Greaves, housekeeper (per annum), 
W. Ashley, housekeeper (per annum),. 
L. Eastman, housekeeper (per annum), 

D. J. Lee, housekeeper (per annum), . 
A. E. Estes, housekeeper (per annum), 

I. N. Bailey, housekeeper (per annum), 

E. B. Williams, supply officer (per annum) 
N. A. Watson, supply officer (per annum), 
M. B. Sargent, dressmaker (per annum), 
W. B. Eastman, superintendent of farm (per annum), 
H. B. Eastman, foreman, Bolton farm (per month), 
D. H. Bailey, carpenter (per month), . 
A. R. Harrington, teamster (per month), 
H. Watson, teamster (per month), 
H. Harrington, dairyman (per month), 
C. A. Vining, laborer (per month), 
R, Vining, laborer (per month), . 

II. M. Vining, laborer (per month), 
W. S. McMackin, laborer (per month), 



Department of Boarding Out and Probation 
M;iry W. Dewson, superintendent (per annum), . 
Angie L. Brackett, visitor (per annum), 
Sarah W. Carpenter, visitor (per annum), . 
Grace C. Albee, visitor (per annum), .... 
Mary M. Glynn, clerk and stenographer (per annum), 

Provisional Appointments allowed by the Civil Service 
Helen R. Wilson, visitor (per annum), 
Lenora A. Hurley, visitor (per annum), 
Margaret Wiswell, visitor (per annum), 
Mary I. Coggeshall, visitor (per annum), 





. $350 00 




350 


00 




400 00 




325 


00 




300 


00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 


00 




350 00 




650 


00 




45 00 




45 


00 




34 00 




34 


00 




32 


00 




30 00 




30 00 




30 


00 




30 


00 


TION 


. $1,700 


00 




700 


00 




600 


00 




600 


00 




800 00 


Servii 


ze. 
$1,000 


00 




600 


00 




600 


00 




600 


00 



Advisory Physicians unpaid. 
Dr. Orville F. Rogers. Dr. Richard C. Cabot. Dr. James S. Stone. 



128 VOLUNTEER VISITORS INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 



VOLUNTEER VISITORS. 



Putnam, Elizabeth C, 
Baker, Mrs. H. N., . 
Bigelow, Mrs. Henry B., 
Brewer, Mrs. Frank C, 
Burt, Miss Grace M., 
Capen, Miss Elida H , 
Coburn, Miss Helen M., 
Cowles, Mrs. William N., 
Cummins, Miss Ann M., 
Donnelly, Mrs J. B., 
Edgett, Miss Ruth F., 
Field, Miss Caroline I., 
Fuller, Mrs. Frederick T. 
Gage, Miss Sybil, 
Hall, Miss Emma R., 
Harlow, Miss Margaret, 
Hurd, Mrs. Albert G., 
Leonard, Miss Lizzie C, 
McGuigan, Miss Mary A. 
Moore, Mrs. AC, . 
Morse, Mrs. S. I., 
Mossey, Mrs.C. E., . 
Mulcahy, Mrs. John, 
Packard, Miss Fanny S., 
Richardson, Miss Louisa C 
Rockwell, Miss Florence, 
Sanford, Miss Martha L., 
Sheffield, Mrs Alfred D., 
Smith, Miss Mary Cushing 
Strong, Miss Maud E., 
Sullivan, Miss May F., . 
Vaughan, Mrs. H. A., 
Warner, Mrs. Charles H., 
Whiting, Mrs. Howard, . 
Wigglesworth, Miss Marion E 
Woodbury, Miss Alice P., 



Boston. 

Medford. 

Lincoln. 

Hingham. 

Newton. 

Spencer. 

Lowell. 

Ayer. 

Boston. 

Gardner. 

Beverly. 

Weston. 

Walpole. 

Cambridge. 

New Bedford. 

Worcester. 

Mill bury. 

Bridgewater. 

Dan vers. 

Watertown. 

Sandwich. 

Roxbury. 

Brookfield. 

Greenfield. 

Chestnut Hill. 

Montague. 

Worcester. 

Springfield. 

Fitchburg. 

Northampton. 

Chicopee. 

Taunton. 

Fall River. 

Great Barrington. 

Milton. 

Gloucester. 






1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 129 



Volunteer Visitors on Special Cases. 

Burbank, Miss Marjorie, Melrose Highlands. 

Clarke, Miss Anna H., Boston. 

Gallup, Miss O. J., North Adams. 

Hey wood, Miss Mabel A., . . . . . Natick. 

Norton, Miss Therese, Arlington. 

Volunteer Office Assistant. 

Cliff, Miss Frederica, Boston. 



130 STATISTICAL FOEM INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 



STATISTICAL FOEM FOE STATE 
INSTITUTIONS. 



[Prepared in accordance with a resolution of the National Conference of Charities and 
Correction, adopted May 15, 1906.] 



Name of institution : State Industeial School foe Giels. 
Number in the Institution. 





Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Number of inmates present at beginning of 


_ 


221 


221 


fiscal year. 








Number received during the year, . 


- 


107 


107 


Number passing out of the institution during 


- 


162 


162 


the year. 








Number at end of the fiscal year in institu- 


- 


243 


243 


tion. 








Daily average attendance (i.e., number of in- 


- 


228 


228 


mates actually present) during the year. 








Average number of officers and employees 


12 


48 


60 


during the year. 









Number in Care of the Probation Department. 
Number in care of probation department for part or all of 

the year, 416 

Number coming of age within the year, and so passing out of 

custody, 114 

Employees of probation department, 9 

Expenditures for the Institution. 
Current expenses : — 

1. Salaries and wages, .... $22,815 37 

2. Clothing, 4,994 97 

3. Subsistence, 8,654 00 

4. Ordinary repairs, 2,505 17 

5. Office, domestic and out-door expenses, . 14,926 96 

Total, |53,896 47 

Amount carried forward, $ 53,896 47 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 131 

Amount brought forward, $53,896 47 

Extraordinary expenses : — 

1. New buildings, land, etc., . . . $10,740 66 

2. Permanent improvements to existing 

buildings, 600 00 

Total, 11,340 66 



Grand total, $65,237 13 

Expenditures for the Probation Department. 

Salaries of visitors, $6,153 42 

Visitors' travelling and office expenses, . . 4,016 56 
Travelling and hospital expenses, board, etc., for 

girls 2,604 88 

12,774 86 



Total expenditures for State Industrial School, . . . $78,01199 

Notes on current expenses : — 

1. Salaries and wages should include salaries of trustees or directors, 

if any. 

2. Clothing includes shoes, and also materials for clothing and shoes if 

they are manufactured in the institution. 

3. Ordinary repairs include all of those which simply maintain the 

buildings in condition, without adding to them. Any repairs which 
are of the nature of additions should be classed with " permanent 
improvements." 

4. This item includes everything not otherwise provided for, e g., furni- 

ture, bedding, laundry supplies, medicines, engineer's supplies, 
postage, freight, library, etc. 

Executive head of the institution (superintendent) : Fannie F. Morse. 
Superintendent of probationers : MARY W. Dewson. 



Public Document No. 18 



FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 



, . OF THE 

Lyman and Industrial 
Schools 



(Formerly known as Trustees of the State Primary and 
Reform Schools), 



Year ending November 30, 1908. 




BOSTON : 

WBIGHT & POTTER PEINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1009. 



Approved by 
The State Board op Publication. 



CONTENTS 



Trustees' Report on Lyman School, 

Trustees' Report on State Industrial School 

Appendix A, Report of Treasurer and Receiver-General on Trust 

Funds, ..... 
Appendix B, Report of Officers of the Lyman School: 

Report of Superintendent, 

Report of Superintendent of Lyman School Probationers, 

Report of Physician, 

Statistics concerning Boys, 

Financial Statement, 

Farm Account, .... 

Valuation of Property, . 

List of Salaried Officers, . 

Statistical Form for State Institutions, 
Appendix C, Report of Officers of the State Industrial School: 

Report of Superintendent, 

Report of Superintendent of Industrial School Probationers 

Medical Report, .... 

Statistics concerning Girls, 

Financial Statement, 

Farm Account, .... 

Valuation of Property, 

Schedule of Persons employed, 

List of Salaried Officers, . 

List of Volunteer Visitors, 

Statistical Form for State Institutions, 



29 

39 
45 
54 
56 
64 
67 
68 
70 
72 

77 

83 

91 

94 

116 

120 

121 

123 

125 

127 

128 



(Enatmmtropaltlj of Jflaaaarlptfif tta. 



Ltxan and Industrial Schools. 



TRUSTEES. 
M. H. WALKER, Westborough, Chairman. 
ELIZABETH G. EVANS, Boston, Secretary. 
SUSAN C. LYMAN, Waltham. 
JAMES W. McDONALD, Marlborough. 
GEORGE H. CARLETON, Haverhill. 
MATTHEW B. LAMB, Worcester. 
CARL DREYFUS, Boston. 

HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS. 

ELMER L. COFFEEN, Superintendent of Lyman School. 

THOMAS H. AYER, Visiting Physician of Lyman School. 

WALTER A. WHEELER, Superintendent of Lyman School Probationers. 

FANNIE F. MORSE, Superintendent of State Industrial School. 

C. C. BECKLEY, Visiting Physician of State Industrial School. 

MARY W. DE'VySON, Superintendent of Industrial School Probationers. 



(ftmtmtnmtttaltlf of Haaaarfjuartta. 



TEUSTEES' EEPOET. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools respect- 
fully present the following report for the year ending Nov. 30, 
1908, for the two reform schools under their control. 

M. H. WALKEE. 
ELIZABETH G. EVANS. 
SUSAN C. LYMAN. 

james w. Mcdonald. 

GEOEGE II. CAELTON. 
MATTHEW B. LAMB. 
CAEL DEEYFUS. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Dec. 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS AT WESTBOROUGH. 

The annual reports of recent years have given so fully the 
details of organization and administration of the Lyman School 
that it seems unnecessary to dwell upon details at this time. 

The school is very seriously embarrassed by overcrowding. 
The number of boys received from the courts for the year 
ending Nov. 30, 1908, was 268, exceeding the number com- 
mitted in any previous year by 61 ; enough for two full fam- 
ilies, making necessary such crowding that cottages intended 
for 28 to 30 boys now have from 35 to 45. This results in 
increased difficulty in maintaining proper discipline and de- 
creased efficiency in all departments of the school. 

In schools recently organized in other States, intended for 
boys like those in our care, cottages have been provided, to 
accommodate not more than 20 inmates, under the care of a 
master and matron. Beside all else that may be done in a 
school of this kind, there must be the personal influence of the 
wise and kindly master and matron in the cottage home, doing 
in some measure what is done by the father and mother in the 
normal home. But what master and matron can father and 
mother 40 boys in one family? 

One of the causes for the great increase of commitments is 
the unusual business depression, resulting in a lessened demand 
for labor in mill and factory. In these days of great and in- 
creasing interest in industrial training for boys and girls, the 
question arises, " Why should not trades be taught at the Lyman 
School ? " Eor many years that form of manual training known 
as sloyd work has been taught to nearly all boys, with excellent 
results, and, in addition, an advanced course in wood turning 
and iron working has been given to selected boys. Another 
class in cabinet making and carpentry has done excellent work. 
A well-equipped printing office, with classes of about 16 boys, 
both morning and afternoon, has been maintained; this last, 
perhaps, almost deserving to be called trade teaching. The 
reasons for stopping here are that the boys while in the school 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 7 

are too young to profit by trade teaching and they remain too 
short a time. 

The average age at commitment is about thirteen and one- 
half years and the average time spent in the school before being 
placed on probation about eighteen months. These boys, when 
received, are found to be very backward in school work, on 
the average nearly two years behind those of the same age in 
our public schools. Evidently it is most important that every- 
thing possible should be done to give them a thorough training 
in the fundamentals of a common school education, keeping 
in mind, as we must, that few are likely to attend the public 
schools after going out because of having reached the limit of 
school age. For the boys of the industrial school about to be 
organized at Shirley there can be no question but that the 
teaching of trades is of great importance. 

The plan adopted a few years since, of sending the boys to 
the churches in the village to attend the morning service, ia 
continued, with satisfactory results. Every boy, so far as possi- 
ble, attends the church of the faith of his parents. The local 
churches have shown every courtesy possible, in some cases put- 
ting themselves to considerable inconvenience to accommodate- 
the boys. 

The work of reforming the wayward boy, and transforming: 
the incipient criminal into an honest, law-abiding citizen, is 
one of vital importance to the Commonwealth and one of serious 
difficulty as well. It makes large demands upon the sympathy, 
patience and wisdom of those who deal with him, both while in 
the school and when outside on probation. The work of the 
visiting department has been exceptionally difficult this year 
because of the unfortunate business conditions throughout the 
Commonwealth. The successful work done merits warm com- 
mendation. 

The measure of success achieved we believe fully justifies- 
the large expenditure, so generously provided by the Common- 
wealth, for the maintenance of the Lyman School. Attention 
is called to the report of the superintendent of the Lyman School 
and also to that of the superintendent of probationers. 

The appropriation of $2,400 for furnishing Elms Cottage 
was expended, so that the cottage was opened in May. The 



8 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

extension of the subway and heating system has been going 
forward under the appropriation of 1907 for $4,125 and of 
1908 for $2,000. The appropriation of 1907 for $2,500 for 
fire protection has been expended, the work having been com- 
pleted. Under the appropriation of 1908 for $6,000 for the 
new horse barn, the work has gone forward. The barn is nearly 
ready for use. 

The new appropriations which will be asked for are : erection 
of double cottage, with a capacity of from 60 to 80 boys ; subway 
of 600 feet, to connect new double cottage with present heating 
system; subway of 350 feet, to connect Willow Park with pres- 
ent heating plant; fire protection apparatus, consisting of 
combination chemical and hose wagon, 500 feet of hose, four 
fire-alarm boxes; furnishing of double cottage. 

The Lyman School opened the year with 342 inmates and 
closed with 419. The whole number of individuals in the school 
during the year was 729, and the average number was 378.5. 

The appropriations for the past year were: for salaries, $35,- 
466; for current expenses, $56,000, a total of $91,466 for run- 
ning the institution ; to be expended in behalf of probationers : 
for tuition fees to towns, $850; for visitation, $10,240; for 
"boarding, $5,500. ' The per capita cost of the institution was 
:$4.89, and $439.30 was turned into the State treasury, making 
a net per capita of $4.87. 

STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS AT LAN- 
CASTER. 

The State Industrial School is the home which the State 
provides for the girls committed to its care, whose own homes 
and surroundings have been insufficient to keep them out of the 
courts. Among the 131 new commitments this year, 59 girls 
had run away from home, 31 had been in the care of private 
societies, 11 had previously been in the care of the State Board 
and 34 had previously been on probation in their own homes. 
The courts commit the girls to the State Industrial School, 
to remain in the control of the trustees until they are twenty-one 
years old. 

The trustees' opportunity is a good one to make many of 
these girls respectable and helpful women. The majority 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 9 

of the girls come to us between the ages of thirteen and sixteen, 
— a period in their lives when, in spite of the apparent out- 
look, they are really unknown quantities. Their wrongdoing 
may not spring from or reach to the core. It is often something 
temporary, — sometimes resulting from a lack of love and guid- 
ance at home to give a natural outlet to their feelings, and some- 
times coming from the dangerous surroundings of city life, 
which have failed to give playgrounds and open-air spaces for 
the overflowing animal spirits of its children. The State recog- 
nizes that the condition of things under which these girls are 
committed is not final, and in an artificial way tries to supply 
to the children their birthright. It has done this by establishing 
the Industrial School at Lancaster, and the probation depart- 
ment, with headquarters in Boston. 

At Lancaster we have a tract of land of 270 acres, with fine 
trees and a beautiful outlook over the valley of the Nashua. 
Here in our eight cottages, scattered about the grounds, we try 
to give the girls a wholesome, hard-working, home life. Each 
cottage has a house mother, housekeeper and teacher in charge 
of its 30 girls. One cottage is set apart for the feeble-minded 
girls, and one cottage, a mile and a half distant from the 
central school, is for the girls who repeatedly fail in the most 
serious way when in the care of the probation department, and 
whose evil report of the world would be a menace to the girls 
just going out from the school for the first time. Among the 
group in this cottage are those who at longer or shorter intervals 
seem to be beside themselves. They cannot be called sane, and 
yet the doctor is slow to call them insane. The insane asylum 
at Westborough has this year taken under observation, with 
their own consent, two of these girls. With the advice result- 
ing from this expert care we hope to deal more humanely with 
these girls, and at the same time protect the hotter people of 
the State. 

Appended to this report i< a study from experience r»f 
u Feeble-mindedness and Juvenile Delinquency," made by 
Mrs. Elizabeth G. Evans and Miss Mary YV. Dewson, which 
has already been published in " Charities and the ( lommons." 

While at the school the girls receive a certain amount of 
social training through the team work involved in working to- 



10 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Dec. 

get her for a common end, — each girl doing her part in the 
household, on the farm and in the athletic games. When a girl 
has settled down and accepted the school and its possibilities, 
and fulfilled, according to her capacity, the plan of work that 
the school offers, she is certified by the superintendent as ready 
to leave the school to go home or to be placed out, as the pro- 
bation committee of the trustees, in consultation with the super- 
intendent of the school and the superintendent of the probation 
department, may think best. Roughly speaking, about one- 
third of the girls' time is spent in the school and two-thirds out- 
side, in the care of the probation department. At school the 
girls have been taught how to work, and have experienced the 
pleasures that come from well-ordered, domestic relationships. 
Here we hope to create, and often succeed in creating, for the 
time, a love for normal life. It is in the world, with the choice 
of rightdoing and the possibility of wrongdoing, that the pro- 
bation department has the difficult task of guiding and wisely 
befriending these girls. 

On leaving the school the girls come into the care of the visit- 
ors of the probation department. From these visitors we must 
ever demand freshness, devotion and a capacity to take infinite 
pains, for all these qualities will be needed in the difficult and 
exacting care of their charges. It is usually wiser for a girl on 
leaving school to again become a member of society to start under 
new conditions rather than at home, where the old surroundings 
and loyalty to former companions so easily drag her down again. 
For this and other reasons we try to find homes for our girls 
among strangers, where, through what they have learned at 
school in the kitchen, laundry and sewing room, they are wel- 
comed and paid for the actual assistance they can give in the 
housework. At best it is a lonely, uphill process, but if a home 
can be found among hard-working, large-hearted people, the 
girl may have a chance for getting, through the family life and 
simple pleasures, some pure human interest which in a measure 
will satisfy her heart; with girls and women nothing can ever 
take the place of human relationships. It takes a fund of 
wisdom and insight on the visitor's part, recognizing the girl's 
need of such a human interest, to see where, between the girl 
and her employer, or the girl and her environment, such an in- 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 11 

terest can be found; but if one can be found the visitor has 
gone a long way toward starting the girl on the upward path. 

The special appropriations of last year were : — 

For enlarging chapel, $7,500. 

For business office, $3,500. 

For furnishing the new cottage, $2,500. 

For sewage disposal, $247.38. 

The things for which we shall ask special appropriations 
this year are : a new cottage ; furnishing for the chapel ; furnish- 
ings and telephones in the office ; finishing rooms in new cottage. 

The school opened the year with 243 girls and closed with 
240, the average being 245. There were 131 new commitments, 
which were 24 more than the year previous. 

The appropriations for the institution were: for salaries, 
$25,018.37, and for other current expenses, $32,375; in addi- 
tion, a transfer of $3,670.11 was made, bringing the cost of 
the institution to $61,063.48. 

The appropriation for boarding out and probation was $12,- 
800, in addition to which a deficit of $184.42 was incurred; 
$2,249.66 was expended directly upon the girls for travelling 
expenses, board of special cases, medical care, etc., and $10,- 
734.76 for salaries and travelling expenses of the visitors, and 
the office expenses of the department. The per capita cost of 
the institution was $4.76 per week, and of the girls outside the 
school approximately 60 cents a week. This gives an approxi- 
mate weekly per capita of $2.07 for the whole number of girls 
in the care of the trustees. 

FEEBLE-MINDEDNESS AND JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 
— A STUDY FKOM EXPERIENCE. 

Elizabeth G. Evans, Trustee of the Lyman and Industrial Schools, Boston. 
Mary W. Dewson, Superintendent Parole Department for Girls. 

It is a fact of common knowledge that certain inmates of 
reformatory institutions are so defective in their mental equip- 
ment and in their power of judgment and self-control that no 
training can fit them for life in the community. It was not, 
however, until the autumn of 1904 thai the trustees of the 
Lyman and Industrial Schools undertook to definitely grapple 
with this problem: by securing the Bervices of a specialist who 



12 FEEBLE-MIXDEPXESS. [Dec. 

should examine the defective and markedly peculiar boys and 
girls : by determining experimentally how such boys and girls 
should be dealt with: by studying statistically the careers ni 
those whe it — as f:ided should go ont into the world. 

By these means it was hoped to throw light upon a baffling 
problem, and : enable the trustees, in dealing with their wards 
in the future, to profit : _ as* experience. 

Past I. 
State. School ?:rU. 
It was the classification of the mentally defective girls in 
Mae sottage, f^rn in the State Industrial School at Lancaster 
ir_ 1902, which drs: forced the feeble-minded problem into 
prominence. By the summer of 1904 the accommodation in 
this aottage proved insufficient. The instLtntion was also over- 

i ~Ied : and the question ; i - - - : the future of girls who 
were being held year after year in a school whose purpose was 
to fit ^irls for life in the community. Could these feeble- 
minded girls e~er be sent out into the world with safety to them- 
s elves ;.- - society! Experience has amply shown that the 
; tfempt to deal in the world with girls of inferior mental grade, 
of defective will ] jaw er and uncontrolled sexual impulses, is 
nothing le ;i than i lesperate undertaking. 

But if girls of this class are not to be placed out. what can 

e ione with them i Are they proper subjects for custodial 
care? The Massaehuse~~ School for the Feeble-minded at 

— -erley already possesses a custodial department to which 
any person who has been certified as a " suitable subject " may 
be committed by a judge of probate Revised Laws, chapter B ~. 
section 118 . TVhat constitutes a suitable subject" is not 
defined by the statute, nor has it yet become a matter of scien- 
tific lefinitton. The question thus is in process of determina- 
tion by principles of common sense as case after case comes up 
foi judgment It is the thrrrifi :■£ this paper that lack of capacity 
for seK-direction and self-support rather than mere lack of 
set 1 isti opacity is the proper ground for custodial care. 

Foi the pnrj se= of the present inquiry 1,186 girls, this being 
'he ~h:lr zj -\. .'. -: iz ''--. i-ire £ tie Liiv.striiL S :■!::". h-erveen 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 13 

Oct. 1, 1900, and Dec. 1, 1907, whether in the institution or 

outside and whether now in custody or having passed out of it, 
may be roughly divided into the four following classes : — 

Feeble-minded and should have custodial care without trial on parole : — 

I. Those obviously incapable of self -direction and self-support, 23 
II. Those whose incapacity for self -direction and self-support 

is less obvious because they are brighter, ... 45 



68 
Sub-normal and should be tried on parole : — 

III. Those whose capacity for self-direction and self-support 

is a question, ......... 82 

IV. Those who are heavily handicapped by mental or moral 

defects, 183 



265 
Proportion who need custodial care, .... 5%o per cent. 
Proportion who should be tried on parole, . . . 22%o per cent. 

Of the 23 girls in class I., upon March 1, 1908, there were : — 

In the Industrial School, 3 

In Waverley, 19 

Tried outside with bad results and now at large, .... 1 

Total of class L, 23 

The nineteen girls sent to Waverley went without trial on 
parole. 1 The only girl of this class put on parole was M. S., 
dearly feeble-minded, but gentle and good in the school, and 
n inch beloved there. Her mother was a rough, turbulent woman, 
with a bad reputation and a drinking husband. In the hope that 
it' M. gol into a good place she might attach herself and stay 
until after she was twenty-one, when she had been for almost 
four years in the school she was placed out on parole. But the 
moment she was out in the world she showed qualities never 
before suspected. She was wild aboul the boys, would go <>ff 
with them when pretending to be at church, and would climb 
out of her window at night. There was no limit to her deceit. 
Presently her mother carried her away and married her that 

1 Including one boarded '>nt with her illegitimate baby for a -h<>rt timr-. 



14 FEEBLE-MINDEDNESS. [Dec. 

very night to a nephew of her husband's whom M. had never 
seen before, a wretched, loafing fellow, whom M. has since 
deserted because he did not support her. A baby was born last 
August and died. M., whose health is broken, is now living in 
her mother's degraded home. It was mistaken kindness that 
gave her a trial in the world. Had she been sent to Waverley 
she might have lived her life out, safe from harm's way, and 
happy and useful. 

There is no question but that girls of this class should have 
custodial care. 

Of the 45 girls in class II., upon March 1, 1908, there 
were : — 



In the school, never tried outside, ..... 
At Waverley, sent from the school without trial on parole, 
At Waverley, sent after trial outside the school, 
On trial, having done well for less than eight months, 
Failures in various degrees, . . . 



11 
9 
9 
2 

14 



Total of class II., . . .45 

Some of the failures in class II. are : — 

M. T., committed as far back as May, 1897, had been out 
nights and had an appetite for strong drink. Both parents were 
dead. She was kept in the school in all for two years and five 
months; was tried also outside in six different places. Shortly 
before she was twenty-one, in May, 1902, she became pregnant. 
She married the father of the child and has since had several 
other children. Her husband is an incapable creature who keeps 
losing his jobs and the condition of the family is pitiful. 

M. S. M. had a respectable mother but an intemperate father. 
She was sent home on trial as one chance before going to Waver- 
ley. She had an illegitimate child whom she deserted, and later 
another, who was syphilitic. It was too late to get her into 
Waverley. She was last seen in the company of sailors. 

J. M. had a drinking father and mother, and the family were 
considered a bad lot by the Associated Charities. J. was kept 
for two years in the school, but she could never learn to tell 
time and could barely read or write. She was tried outside in 
four places. Not long before she became twenty-one she had 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 15 

an illegitimate child. She and the baby were then put in an 
excellent place together. The employer, a woman of dominant 
character, was deeply interested in J., who stayed on with her 
for six months after she was twenty-one; but then the baby 
died and J. soon went back to her mother. The baby was feeble- 
minded and J. developed epileptic fits. 

D. W. was the daughter of a drinking man. At the time of 
her commitment a sister had had an illegitimate child and 
D. was thought to be pregnant. She was gentle and good at 
the school and when placed out she stayed in one family for 
almost three years ; but when she became twenty-one she im- 
mediately went to a disreputable sister. Later she was reported 
to be leading a dissipated life. Her connection with a married 
man led to the breaking up of his family. The chief of police 
has recently warned D. that she must keep quiet or she will be 
arrested. 

M. D. came of wretched people ; both parents were intem- 
perate, and her father had abused her mother until her mind 
was affected. Before commitment M. had been incorrigible, 
addicted to staying out nights, unchaste, etc. When placed she 
was carefully guarded ; but she ran away and married a man of 
about the same mental grade as herself, who had been in prison 
for setting fire to buildings. They have lived in a miserable 
way, and when seen recently she was in a wretched condition, 
with no food, no money — mercifully so far no baby, a truly 
pitiable creature with no outlook before her. 

OtheT girls of this class are: — 

L. L., committed t<> Sherborn Prison for night walking. 

E, M., syphilitic, and allowed to go with her mother to Nova 
Sco1 ia. 

M. I'.., married t<» a dissolute fellow of low mental grade; 
three babies, all <!• ad ; M. bearing an unsavory reputation. 

A. (I., with specific disease, guarded with great cure till she 
was twenty-one; recently heard of as a waitress in a hotel ami 
a- roomii g in a disreputable quarter of ih«' city. 

And bo "in 

There remain jusl two girls <>f this class who so far have 
not shown themselves incapable of lives in the world. They 
arc : — 



16 FEEBLE-MINDEDNESS. [Dec. 

M. W., committed November, 1902, having been picked up 
drunk on the streets. During her long stay at the school she 
could barely learn to tell time, but she was useful and good 
and had no bad desires. It was, however, her settled intention 
to marry as soon as she should get her freedom, as she con- 
sidered it a disgrace to be an " old maid." The immediate 
members of her family were degenerate and forlorn, but when 
she came of age last November she was sent to a respectable aunt 
who had offered her a home. It is intended to follow her history 
as it develops. 

The only other girl who is classed as a success is O. R., who 
was in the school for over five years and who was placed out 
last August. There are little children in the family to whom 
she is attached and she is well protected from the temptations 
of the world. She is subject to periodic attacks of depression 
and sullenness, but otherwise she is pleasant and quite a good 
worker. While in the school she showed licentious tendencies, 
and was a girl who it was horrible to think might ever bear 
children. Her mother was a half-breed negress and Indian, 
whose two other daughters were prostitutes. Under the present 
circumstances O. seems safe. But will she be different if she 
stays there until she is twenty-one % 

The experience with the girls of class II. can be summarized 
as follows : — 

These girls are mentally somewhat below the normal level, 
but under regular control and supervision they can carry on 
fairly well such work as is given them. The power to do this, 
however, is not well sustained, and this, combined with their 
need of constant protection, causes them to frequently lose their 
positions. Moreover, as soon as supervision and control are 
relaxed such girls are found to be wholly incapable of getting 
on in the world. Their general intellectual resistance is so 
weak, and their intellectual power so poor, that they are unable 
to meet the common difficulties and evils of life, and are carried 
helplessly in the wrong direction. That it was possible to keep 
such a girl temporarily safe by using great vigilance was demon- 
strated with many of the twenty-three failures of class II. The 
end, however, has been invariably the same. 

While on trial some of the girls became too debauched for 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 17 

admission to Waverley, thus losing their chance; and others, 
before being sent, became the victims of experiences which 
might have resulted in pregnancy or disease. In the face of 
these facts the end to be striven for is the commitment of such 
girls to custodial care as soon as they are recognized. For 
them the expensive training of an industrial school is not war- 
ranted. They are a clog in its wheels. Parole work is thrown 
away in their case. They take an undue proportion of a visitor's 
time. To work against certain failures discourages a visitor 
whose whole strength is needed for the hopeful girls. More- 
over, the career of irreclaimable girls harms the standing of 
a reform school in the community, and destroys many oppor- 
tunities for its legitimate charges. 

Of the 82 girls in class III., upon March 1, 1908, there 
were : — 

In the Industrial School, never tried outside, . . . . .11 

Sent to Waverley after trial outside, 8 

Out of the State, conduct unknown, 3 

Paroled and successes, 21 

Failures in varying degrees, ........ 39 

Total of class III., 82 

But how pitiful has been the success of those classed above as 
" successes ! " Two of them have had an illegitimate child, but 
have since married and are good though not efficient mothers; 
1 has married a wretchedly poor widower with a family for 
whom she has neither the willingness nor the ability to care; 
8 were practically never let out of sight, and it is hard to be- 
lieve that they will not go wrong when looking out for thcm- 
Belves; 9 others were kept safe with a degree less of care, but 
the outlook for them is not bright; 1 has been four times re- 
turned to the school ; i ii*l has had fourteen different places. 

Among the oil classed as ''failures in various degrees" arc 
21 who are now of age, of whom 4 have each had two illegiti- 
mate children; >') have each had one illegitimate child: and 10 
have been unchaste, of whom 2 have been in Sherborn Prison. 
Three of the above girls are married, all wretchedly. Of the 
remaining 17 who are -till on parole, .1 has two illegitimate 
children and 5 have one each. 



IS FEEBLE-MINDEDNESS. [Dec. 

The following is an interesting illustration of hoping where 
there can be no hope : — 

B. D. is a girl whose case was many times considered. Pre- 
vious to commitment to Lancaster her parents had had her 
examined with a view to sending her to Waverley; but the ex- 
amining physician did not find her a suitable subject. She 
had then gone very far wrong. At Lancaster she showed her- 
self a capable girl, was refined in her tastes, and played the 
piano; but when put on trial at home, her mother was wholly 
unable to control her. She was then tried in a place; but she 
took the first opportunity to be unchaste and to steal from her 
employer, and she was returned to the school, to be kept there 
for eighteen months, until she was almost twenty-one. Dr. 
Eernald meanwhile examined her and thought her a typically 
feeble-minded subject of the higher grade ; and he said he should 
not hesitate a moment to receive her. But her father, who is 
a man of character and intelligence, holding a good business 
position, thought that through her long training at Lancaster 
she had made permanent progress, and urged that she should 
be tried again at home, saying that, should she show any tend- 
ency to relapse into her old ways, he would himself send her 
to Waverley. She behaved all right for two months, until she 
was twenty-one, when she immediately ran away. Her father 
is distracted and is trying to find her and send her to Waverley. 

However, in spite of the fact that even the successes among 
class III. are almost failures, experience justifies the trial of 
such girls upon parole. 

Of the 183 girls in class IV., upon March 1, 1908, there 
were : — 

In the school, never tried outside, 62 

Committed to insane hospitals, . . . . . . 9 

Conduct unknown, . . . . . . . . . 9 

Paroled and successes, . . . . . . . . .60 

Failures in varying degrees, 43 

Total of class IV., 183 

Of those classed as doing well, 20 have been on parole less 
than two years; 8 have had nine illegitimate children, but 5 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 19 

of these girls were married later. Of those classed as doing 
badly, 11 girls had thirteen illegitimate children. 

As a class these girls are morally weak, unstable and erratic, 
subject to peculiar ideas, too easily and insufficiently excited 
emotions, uncontrollable bursts of anger, but with less lack of 
general intelligence than the three previous classes. None of 
them has ever been thought a suitable subject for Waverley. 

Girls at Waverley. 

Since the year 1900, 45 Industrial School girls have been 
sent to Waverley, of whom 2 were sent for observation. Of the 
whole number, 19 were of class I., 18 of class II. and 8 of 
class III. As to the suitability of these girls for a feeble-minded 
school, the only possible question is in regard to one who was 
committed later to an insane asylum, and two others who may 
be insane. Of the remaining 42 girls, Dr. Fernald considers 
every one of them suitable subjects for Waverley. Not one of 
them has ever run away, though the restraints put upon them are 
of the gentlest. That they can be detained without imprison- 
ment, and can be contented in the society of the definitely feeble- 
minded, in itself is an evidence that they are feeble-minded too. 
To judge by their faces, they are for the most part smilingly 
happy. Under direction, their work has a distinct economic 
value. And the round of useful tasks and innocent pleasures 
which the social life of the institution offers is in merciful con- 
trast to the wretchedness and degradation which would surely 
await them in the world outside. 

The point of interest for the future to develop will be whether 
these girls will really be detained through the child-bearing 
period of their lives. So far only 5 of them have been dis- 
charged, 1 to leave the State with her mother, and the others 
to be under close supervision by respectable relatives. Four 
Industrial School girls sent to Waverley in the early '90\< have 
been there now for from fourteen to almost eighteen years. 

Within the past three years, as girl after girl has been senl 
to Waverley, the question has arisen in regard to each, Will 
she be found a suitable subject? Can -lie be contented in a 
UvUe-minded school? Is she simply licentious, like a multi- 
tude of other people, or will it be found thai she classes in with 



20 FEEBLE-MIXDEDXESS. [Dec. 

the typically feeble-minded, born to be victims if exposed to 
temptation, but often gentle and good if shielded from a world 
with which they are congenitally unfitted to cope, — girls who, 
to quote Dr. Fernald's words, if not protected develop into 
" instinctive criminals." The question of the ability of a feeble- 
minded school to handle girls of this class has been demon- 
strated : and their fate if sent out into the world has been 
demonstrated, too. beyond a peradventure. 

Conclusions. 
Were the policy adopted of sending all of classes I. and II. 
to Waverley as soon as recognized, and likewise certain of class 
III. in the earlier stages of failure — 

The school and the parole department would be set free for their 
legitimate work of reinstating hi the world girls whom there is at least 
a fighting chance of reclaiming. 

The State would be saved great expense from the breeding of de- 
fective and diseased children. 

The community would be protected from demoralization, it being 
almost worse for girls of this type to many and rear children than to 
become prostitutes. 

A class of peculiarly defenseless girls would be protected from 
misery and degradation. 

Paet II. 
Lyman School Boys. 
It was the urgency of the feeble-minded problem in regard to 
the girls that suggested the study of the same problem among 
the boys of the Lyman School at TTestborough. In the autumn 
of 1904 a canvass of the inmates was undertaken, with a view 
to bringing all who seemed in any way mentally defective before 
a specialist for examination and advice. Since this study was 
undertaken there have been, either in the school or outside under 
the care of the visiting department, and thus liable to be re- 
turned should they fail to get on in the community, approxi- 
mately 1,625 boys, which figure is taken as the number from 
which cases identified as mentally defective are selected. 
Among these 1.625 bovs there were found: — 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 21 

Feeble-minded, and believed incapable of self-support or self- 
direction, .... 26 

Decidedly sub-normal, but not believed to be custodial cases, . . 24 



50 
Proportion of feeble-minded and sub-normal to the whole num- 
ber, 3 per cent. 

The number of the subnormal would undoubtedly be very 
much larger were there a more thorough knowledge of the whole 
group. 

Taking up first the study of the 2C feeble-minded boys, upon 
March 1, 1908, there were: — 

In the Lyman School, never tried outside, 1 

Sent to Waverley, 18 

Released on parole, . 7 



26 



The histories of 4 of the 7 boys released on parole are so 
unexpected as to be worth recounting, as follows : — 

J. M. McS. was brought before the court for commitment to 
Waverley, but his people appeared in protest and the judge 
desired he should be given a trial with them. His home Gon- 
dii ions were so miserable that under ordinary circumstances 
the trustees would have refused to place him with his parents. 
However, he is now in his nineteenth year, and he has been on 
parole for two years and four months, living at home. He 
lias worked most of the time and has committed no offence. 

J. J. was classified as a boy who could not be expected to 
earn his living or keep out of trouble, but his commitment to 
Waverley was no1 attempted, as the co-operation of his people 
could nol be secured. He is now seventeen, and he has been 
on parole for two years and five months. He bas done well 
righl along and earns $7.50 a week in a shoo shop. 

M. F. ran away from I lie Lyman School four times, 1 lie last 
occasion being the day after the judge signed his commitment 
to Waverley. He was found at home, earning $6 a week in 
a mill, and accordingly he was formally released to the care of 
bis parents. 



22 FEEBLE-MINDEDNESS. [Dec. 

All the others of this group have earned their living, with 
the exception of T. C, now on parole for almost three years 
and idle most of the time, but harmless. He is supported by 
a mother and sister, who make allowance for his incapacity and 
love him dearly. 

Thus, of the above 7 boys, believed to be so feeble-minded as 
to be incapable of self-support or self-direction, all but one has 
so far supported himself, and not one of them is known to have 
been an injury to the community. 

Turning now to the disposition of the 25 sub-normal cases, 
upon March 1, 1908, there were: — 

In the Lyman School, never tried outside, 6 

Runaways, conduct unknown, 2 



On trial; well behaved so far, 

On trial and failures, returned to Lyman School, . . .3 
On trial and failures, criminal records, . . . . . 5 



24 



Of the 8 wlio have done well, however, one has been on trial 
for only a few weeks and another for less than a year, so the 
conduct of these two should more properly be called unknown. 
Were they so classed, we should have 10 untried or unknown, 
8 failures and only 6 successes. 

The 8 boys classed as failures are : — 

J. R., who has a web hand. He is lazy and shiftless, and in 
all probability he will be a pauper and a vagrant. He comes 
of wretched people. 

H. K. is nervous and lacking in self-control, and has heart 
trouble. He was at home on parole for over two years, but he 
was expelled from school and had not the health to work. Then 
he fell into the habits of a vagrant, and at the request of his 
parents he was returned to the school. His father is a fairly 
well-to-do Jew and is able to support his son, but his mother 
is a most unreasonable and uncontrolled woman. 

W. J. C. was placed on parole in his most wretched home 
because he was too incompetent to be placed elsewhere. He 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 23 

worked irregularly for twenty-two months, when he was arrested 
for some trifling matter and returned to the Lyman School. A 
brother is a runaway from Waverley. 

F. C. was an illegitimate child who had been formerly in 
a Catholic Home and in the House of the Angel Guardian. 
He was a boy of depraved nature, whose influence in the school 
was so demoralizing that he was transferred to the Massachu- 
setts Eeformatory at Concord. He was recently released and 
went to a decent half-brother. 

W. D. has a defective hand and wets his bed. He had for- 
merly been at the truant school. His home was poor, his father 
a drinking man. After two years and three months in the school 
he went out to a place, from which he was returned in a month ; 
lie was soon placed again and returned in three months ; he was 
placed again and returned in one mouth ; he was then kept a 
year and two months in the school for lack of knowing what 
else to do with him. Finally he was allowed to go home. He 
is idle, drinks, lives with a disreputable woman, and has been 
in the house of correction for drunkenness and assault. 

W. G. was recommended for Waverley, but improved after 
an operation for adenoids. He ran away from the school, broke 
and entered, and was transferred to Concord. 

F. A. came to the school with incipient consumption. He was 
a boy of criminal instincts and proved to be a determined run- 
away. He was transferred to Concord as a protection to the 
community. 

J. B. has a most pitiful story. His mother has a bad reputa- 
tion, drinks and is miserably poor. His father was a drunkard 
and became insane. A half-brother, who is called a " hard 
ticket," lias been frequently arrested for drunkenness; recently 
he was said to bo a consumptive. When J. came to the school he 
had heart trouble and syphilitic eyes, and he had been told 
he would become blind. His health had been injured, among 
other things, by bad habits and cigarettes. Eni he was nol con- 
sidered a suitable subjeel for Waverley, and after two years in 
the school he was allowed to go to his mother, there being nothing 
else to do with him. A yeaT later he was sentenced to Concord. 
It is hard to see how he can ever gel on in the world, and the 
outlook for him is mosl miserable. 



24 FEEBLE-MINDEDNESS. [Dec. 

The 6 boys classed as successes are : — 

E. H., on trial for three years and then returned to the school 
for stealing $40. On a second trial he has done well for now 
almost three years. He is, however, a very'Hinbalanced boy. 

D. B. looks perhaps more of a fool than he is; certainly it 
was hard to think when he went out into the world that he 
could get on. He is now approaching his majority and has been 
on parole for three years. He has earned his living right along, 
working at various jobs, mostly as farm hand or laborer; he 
is now driving an express team. He is always a butt on account 
of his foolish ways, but he is a respectable young fellow. 

E. E. recently died from tuberculosis of the knee, having been 
on parole for over three years. He made some progress in 
capacity, but was of a very cross-grained disposition. He has 
earned his living ever since he was fourteen years of age, and 
had forty-seven dollars in the bank when he died. 

G. C. had been in the care of the State Board of Charity as 
a neglected child. He is a well-disposed lad and will earn his 
living if his health allows. He is at present back at the school 
ill with rheumatism. He has been on parole for four and one- 
half years, and is now in his twentieth year. 

W. A. A. belongs to respectable people, who when W. was 
ready to be released on parole moved into the country so that 
he could work upon a farm. That was almost three years ago, 
W. being then over seventeen years. of age. He did well at farm 
work for about six months and then enlisted in the navy. 

A. W. is notably lacking in judgment; an operation for 
adenoids resulted in great improvement in his condition. He 
has now been for one year at work upon a farm. He lights 
matches in the barn; but his employer nevertheless keeps him 
because he is such a good worker. 

A comparison of the careers of the boys of this group with 
those who are disti